Velorooms - Cycling Forum

General => General Discussion => Topic started by: StraßenRennen on February 02, 2012, 19:31

Title: Books
Post by: StraßenRennen on February 02, 2012, 19:31
Anyone read anything half way decent recently? Just read through my 39 book terry pratchett series for the 900th time and am considering starting a new collection...
Title: Re: Books
Post by: L'arri on February 02, 2012, 19:57
I'm just over halfway through Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment at the moment. I find that I both love and loathe his work at the same time.

I forget now which writer once said that one could find all of the range of human experience in The Brothers Karamazov but, even if I hope to discover much more of life in the future, I can well believe that statement.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: StraßenRennen on February 02, 2012, 20:09
I'm just over halfway through Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment at the moment. I find that I both love and loathe his work at the same time.

Ive already punished myself through crime and punishment. I then rewarded myself by reading something shorter in Shōgun by James Clavell   ::).
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Libertine Seguros on February 02, 2012, 20:13
I'm starting work on Vasily Grossman's Life and Fate, a 1000-page epic centring on Stalingrad and being the WWII counterpart to the great Russian realist epics of the 19th Century.

To be honest though, my favourite Russian writer is Nikolai Gogol, whose works manage to influence both the realist epics of Tolstoy and the surreal, claustrophobic paradoxes of Kafka.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: L'arri on February 02, 2012, 20:16
Ive already punished myself through crime and punishment. I then rewarded myself by reading something shorter in Shōgun by James Clavell   ::).

It's not very long, compared with War and Peace or A La Recherche du Temps Perdu :)

Reminds me of the great (but rather ill-informed) Alan Partridge, who once said when opening an interview with a writer: "[My] first thought on your book? Don't drop it on my foot."
Title: Re: Books
Post by: L'arri on February 02, 2012, 20:17
I'm trying to write one too. But it's all a question of having the time. And I don't.  :(
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Anthony Moan on February 02, 2012, 20:21
I'm just over halfway through Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment at the moment. I find that I both love and loathe his work at the same time.

I forget now which writer once said that one could find all of the range of human experience in The Brothers Karamazov but, even if I hope to discover much more of life in the future, I can well believe that statement.
Great taste, it is classic. I love that Russians.
Did not read anything for 6 or so months, can not concentrate ::)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Tuart on February 02, 2012, 20:27
Would love a good or fantasy series to read. Preferably something similar to LOTR or ASOIAF. Read Magician (Riftwar Saga, Raymond E. Feist) and yes, I know what the title insinuates but it was a bit too much magicky for me, I like the novels where magic is more a background thing. Magician ended way too neatly and cheesy too. He clearly wasn't expecting to write sequels :D
Title: Re: Books
Post by: StraßenRennen on February 02, 2012, 20:39
Would love a good or fantasy series to read.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Discworld (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Discworld)

Only read if you have the following:

A dark sense of hummor.
You can understand the english langauge version of the books.
Enjoy seeing various characters progressing throughout the books.

I would recommend reading them in character "mini series basis" order rather than cronological. But free countries free choices, neither way is bad.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Zam on February 02, 2012, 20:57
Fiction. I want to finish all of Jack Higgins. :)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: blutto on February 03, 2012, 15:09
...currently piling thru a 4 volume collection of short stories written by Philip k. Dick...highly recommended...

Cheers

blutto
Title: Re: Books
Post by: DinZ on February 03, 2012, 21:18
I struggle with time to read these days, as i walk to work and ride several evenings a week as not a fan of mornings

but the wet weather this weekend means i may well start on midnight's children by Salman Rushdie. Try an alternate my books between something 'lighter' and something heavier or non fiction. this is an attempt as something heavier than i would normally select.

Last book was Project ULF which was sci fi which is definitely not my cup of tea (i seem to have a very limited imagination and just cannot get involved enough in fantasy / sci fi stories.) but book was written by a friend so thought i would give it a go. enjoyed it more than i thought i would and may even try the second in the series. 
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Quixote on February 04, 2012, 00:21
I read Bernard Cornwall's Saxon trilogy in the past year which I think was tops if you like historical fiction. Also, Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese is really good. My wife talked me into reading the Hunger Games trilogy (which is supposedly written for teenage girls). Surprising how good the first two were...easy reads but fun...not Tolstoy you know.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Havetts on February 04, 2012, 00:28
I've read Operation Double Eagle by Owen Sela lately, old book but really nice and thrilling.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: tick on February 04, 2012, 01:32
recently re-read Le Morte d'Arthur for the first time in many years. i remembered why i liked it so much when i was a kid.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: The Hitch on February 04, 2012, 01:34
Currently reading "Our Guerillas our sidewalks" - a  true story  memoir  by a leftist Colombian-  American historian who sympathizes with Guerillas and openly supports their cause in the country's newspapers, reacting to the kid kidnapping of his brother in law by the very   guerilla soldiers he supports in 1988.

So many twists and turns I have to keep checking online that this book really is non fiction
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Sylvester on February 09, 2012, 14:37
I didn't read all that much the past weeks (I'm trying to read two books per week), yet I truly enjoyed everything I read. I'm very much into Isaac Bashevis Singer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Bashevis_Singer) at the moment. Definitely one of the greatest writers of the past century, and arguably the best storyteller. I especially recommend The Family Moskat, a true epos on the pre-war Polish Jews.

I also enjoyed reading Down and out in Paris and London by Orwell (and thought it was a more powerful book than his big novels).

The sergeant in the snow (Il sergente nella neve, I read it in Italian) by Mario Rigoni Stern, an autobiographical book on the retreat from Russia by the Italian Alpine corp during WW II, contains beautiful chapters and is very, very human.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: pedaling squares on February 09, 2012, 22:55
Just started god is not Great by Hitchens. Too early to give an opinion. And I read Heir to the Empire by Zahn to my son before bedtime. He's really into the Star Wars universe and I'm not ashamed to admit that it's entertaining me too.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: SAT252 on February 17, 2012, 22:03
Just read The Sisters Brothers - Patrick De Witt. Set in 1850s America. Very dark but very funny. Worth a read.

S
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Icebreaker on February 25, 2012, 06:55
For some reason I have decided to go back and re-read all of the George Smiley series of Le Carre's books.


They are well written and every bit as convoluted as I remember.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Martin318is on February 27, 2012, 04:03
For some reason I have decided to go back and re-read all of the George Smiley series of Le Carre's books.


They are well written and every bit as convoluted as I remember.

Probably because the movie jsut came out?   ;)

IN the last quarter of THE Honorable Schoolboy as we speak!  :D
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Martin318is on February 27, 2012, 04:12
Read the Pratchetts again - they deserve it!

Other than that,
"August 1914", "March 1917", "April 1917" Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn - quite a heavy book but as an Anglo its amazing to read about the Russian front in WWI and the Russian revolution, etc.

Robert Rankin - the Brentford trilogy.  A very weird series of 4 books..
Le Carre - anything he wrote
Billion Dollar Brain, Funeral in Berlin, Ipcress File - Len Deighton
Title: Re: Books
Post by: L'arri on February 27, 2012, 08:30
My current read:

(http://images.harpercollins.co.uk/hcwebimages/HCCOVERS/057700/057775-FC222.jpg)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Dancing on the Pedals on February 28, 2012, 17:46
I read Bernard Cornwall's Saxon trilogy in the past year which I think was tops if you like historical fiction.

Love his books - really funny and nice guy as well in the flesh.

Recent good reads include Marching Powder by Rusty Young, his account of his experiences of getting busted as a drug smuggler in Bolivia and the surreal nature of the infamous San Pedro prison.  First read it whilst travelling, and well worth reading a second time.
(http://www.marchingpowder.com/img/front_cover_full.jpg)

Also recently finished Stalingrad by Anthony Beevor, a very good and thorough account of the the battle and its consequences, and I am currently ploughing through Hugh Brogan's biography of Alexis de Tocqueville (there is a bit of a history theme in my reading preferences...)

(http://www.penguin.com.au/jpg-large/9780141032405.jpg) (http://theorwellprize.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/Brogan-Tocqueville.jpg)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: StraßenRennen on February 28, 2012, 18:37
"August 1914", "March 1917", "April 1917" Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn - quite a heavy book but as an Anglo its amazing to read about the Russian front in WWI and the Russian revolution, etc.

Robert Rankin - the Brentford trilogy.  A very weird series of 4 books..

Just bought them all on ebay for a 1euro in total plus shipping looking foward to getting into them.

Recent good reads include Marching Powder by Rusty Young, his account of his experiences of getting busted as a drug smuggler in Bolivia and the surreal nature of the infamous San Pedro prison.  First read it whilst travelling, and well worth reading a second time.

Also recently finished Stalingrad by Anthony Beevor, a very good and thorough account of the the battle and its consequences

And the recommendation from Pedals about Marching Powder, will be taken up too, Stanligrad I have previously read and found it to be a hugely enjoyable book.

And since there seems to be a few historical fiction readers here, let me recommend:

(http://www.knihyzanglie.cz/image/cache/data/hannibal-500x500.jpg)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Martin318is on February 29, 2012, 00:43
Just bought them all on ebay for a 1euro in total plus shipping looking foward to getting into them.

Shazzam!
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Quixote on February 29, 2012, 02:51
Just finished Sisters Brothers by DeWitt. He's a relatively new writer (only his second novel) with a ton of talent. This novel takes place during the gold rush. A couple of brothers, last name Sisters, are killers off to honor a new contract in San Francisco. The problem revolves around one of the brothers beginning to question his profession. The setting is Northern California (actually right in my "backyard" so to speak)...the author takes some liberties with the setting, but all for the good of the story. An easy and quick read this is...get in on the ground floor of a rising star.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Anthony Moan on March 08, 2012, 21:59
Next to salami and croissant section at nearby grocery store I found "I am God" by Giorgio Faletti book for less then 4 euro.
So far so good nothing to complain expect awful translation and small font.
Some crazy dude is really peeed of and trying to kill everyone on his way, nice thriller.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Anthony Moan on March 08, 2012, 22:01
Did not see but German dude started book thread ;)
What did I told you about Germans?
Title: Re: Books
Post by: l29205 on June 06, 2012, 19:11
The death of one of the recent greats.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/06/06/showbiz/ray-bradbury-obit/index.html?hpt=hp_c1 (http://www.cnn.com/2012/06/06/showbiz/ray-bradbury-obit/index.html?hpt=hp_c1)

Favorite quote in the article.

"In my later years I have looked in the mirror each day and found a happy person staring back." he wrote in a book of essays published in 2005. "Occasionally I wonder why I can be so happy. The answer is that every day of my life I've worked only for myself and for the joy that comes from writing and creating. The image in my mirror is not optimistic, but the result of optimal behavior."
Title: Re: Books
Post by: froome19 on June 06, 2012, 19:26
Anyone read anything half way decent recently? Just read through my 39 book terry pratchett series for the 900th time and am considering starting a new collection...

If you like Terry Pratchet you should try Robert Jordan's series of the Wheel of Time, its effectively a more complex and better version of the Lord of the rings and consists of 14 books. i have been reading them since I was 12 and they are absolutely brilliant.
Unfortunately Jordan (his pen name) died but they have now got Brandon Sanderson to complete the last book which Jordan left extensive notes and recording for.
A must read for any fantasy readers
Title: Re: Books
Post by: l29205 on June 06, 2012, 20:24
If you like Terry Pratchet you should try Robert Jordan's series of the Wheel of Time, its effectively a more complex and better version of the Lord of the rings and consists of 14 books. i have been reading them since I was 12 and they are absolutely brilliant.
Unfortunately Jordan (his pen name) died but they have now got Brandon Sanderson to complete the last book which Jordan left extensive notes and recording for.
A must read for any fantasy readers

I have been reading it from the age of 33  :fp , I don't disagree with froomes assessment but I did find that the series started to get a bit redundant after the 6-7 book.  Still a good read but more of a really that again.  The first book is without a doubt a must read for fantasy fans.  And it does engage you to continue with the series. A plus is if you like to hold the book most of them are pretty cheap on the used market and there are several chances to get the original hardcovers for less than the paperback price at a lot of local bookstores.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: mew on June 13, 2012, 00:31
Wow
nice looking guidebook ad on side of homepage today... :-*

it looks like a really great place for cruising around will have to get there

and appropriately named author  :)

The NANTES-BREST CANAL

a Red Dog Brittany guide

Foreword and Introduction by Wendy Mewes
Title: Re: Books
Post by: ram on June 15, 2012, 15:55
Wow
nice looking guidebook ad on side of homepage today... :-*

it looks like a really great place for cruising around will have to get there

and appropriately named author  :)

The NANTES-BREST CANAL

a Red Dog Brittany guide

Foreword and Introduction by Wendy Mewes
Spamming self book :D Though, I'd have expected a foreward for a red cat guide.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Anthony Moan on July 03, 2012, 16:49
Sidney Sheldon "The Other Side of Midnight", it can t be better than this. Sex, politics, drama, thriller, court trial, Paris, murder, nice food, war, sex, Gestapo, sex, and many more :D
Title: Re: Books
Post by: The Poster Formerly Known As Moondance on July 03, 2012, 16:56
I am reading Bruno Schulz's works, The Cinnamon Shops/The Street of Crocodiles and Sanatorium Under the Sign of the Hourglass again for the first time in many years... Gosh those stories are amazing, and the prose is just incredible. Painting with words.

Recommend it to everyone, all ages.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Anthony Moan on July 14, 2012, 21:36
I am reading "The Kite Runner" and on the half I am saying nice book. Strong story about two kids Pashtu-Hazara relation, nice really.
Title: Books
Post by: kabloemski on November 04, 2012, 10:50
After a few false starts I have finally made some headway into this. I'm no aficionado, but will let you guys know what I think #CricketBio #RevisedUpdatedEdition
Title: Books
Post by: kabloemski on November 04, 2012, 10:53
And by headway I mean p 30 - my dad's distracting me..
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Havetts on November 04, 2012, 10:56
Mijn Duitsland (My Germany) by Geert van Istendael :). Good book, shows lots of sides of  Germany and how it has become the germany it is right now. :)
Title: Books
Post by: kabloemski on November 04, 2012, 15:11
"
Haven't really often seen Ferrer play thus far, but he kinda reminds me of another great, and a personal fave of mine, Andre Agassi - small & tenacious - fights 'til the bitter end #TennisTerrier #ILoveTennis

BTW read his bio - Open - really enjoyed it - great insight - Andre does not pussyfoot around with fancy words - tells it like it is - and gives one a bit of sympathy for top athletes too - well worth the read
"
Title: Books
Post by: kabloemski on November 04, 2012, 15:14
Open

Title: Re: Books
Post by: kabloemski on December 13, 2012, 19:30
"@RubyGold: Complete Sherlock Holmes free on Kindle http://t.co/myOnFODR"

I follow Open Culture on Twitter @openculture & they seem to have loads & loads of cool stuff like this - courses, languages, textbooks, e-books, movies, etc

http://www.openculture.com/2012/12/the_complete_sherlock_holmes_now_free_on_the_kindle.html

Title: Re: Books
Post by: Anthony Moan on December 13, 2012, 21:28
Re-reading Catch-22 for the 80957392753290 time. Love the book and when I grow up I want to be just like Milo.
Was working with 1st lt Milošević (yes he is Croat) I was call him Milo ;D
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Michielveedeebee on December 15, 2012, 15:10
If you like fantasy, try 'the malazan book of the fallen'. 9 novel series by Steven Erikson. It's amazing
Title: Re: Books
Post by: froome19 on December 15, 2012, 20:27
Seen that book around, got my reading list sorted for a couple of months but after that would like to try those out..
Title: Books
Post by: kabloemski on December 21, 2012, 17:58
"@marcopinotti: The english version of my book will be released soon in digital version on Amazon"
Title: Books
Post by: kabloemski on December 28, 2012, 12:00
"@UCI_Overlord: Read the article on @marcopinotti's new book here http://t.co/5KX1lhBs and buy it here http://t.co/msCJChta You won't be disappointed."

http://m.cyclingnews.com/news/pinotti-details-his-life-as-a-pro-cyclist-in-new-book

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00ARMQ4LK/ref=redir_mdp_mobile/182-6113422-5359320?qid=1356617721&ref_=sr_1_1&s=digital-text&sr=1-1
Title: Re: Books
Post by: froome19 on January 03, 2013, 18:23
5 MORE DAYS UNTIL THE GREATEST FANTASY EPIC OF ALL TIME COMES TO AN END.



Robert  Jordan's Wheel of Time series: The final volume, the 14th of the series will be released on the 8th of January. I have spent the last couple of months re reading the series and am now prepared for the release. I have read a wide range of fiction books and nearly all the great fantasy and sci-fi releases but this one for me tops them all.

He died in 2007 whilst writing the last of his books. His wife then chose an up and coming and generally regarded as the soon to be next thing in the world of fantasy author Brandon Sanderson to write the last book. It was so extensive though that after seeing all the notes Sanderson was forced to publish it as 3 books.

The last one entitled A Memory of Light is to be released this Tuesday. The speculation on the book has been overwhelming. Over the past couple of weeks I have immersed myself in it and I must admit that the detail which Jordan wrote with meant that the plot becomes so intriguing and bewitching as you analyse every single individual word. Sanderson has not a speck on Jordan and admittedly he does not have the unique genius, attention to detail and ability to define a character which Jordan has but he was aided by extensive notes and even written excerpts from Jordan written before he passed away.

Also what I find fascinating is the remarkable depth of the series. Specifically the characters are based on so many parallels from many different inspirations and each of them are integrated within the series so effortlessly.
Quote
The series draws on numerous elements of both European and Asian mythology, most notably the cyclical nature of time found in Hinduism and Buddhism, the concepts of balance, duality, a matter-of-fact respect for nature found in Daoism, as well as a creation story similar to that of Christianity in "The Creator" (Light) and "The Dark One". It was also partly inspired by Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace.

Jordan ,who's real name was Oliver Rigney, wrote the last chapter and it promises to be
Spoiler (hover to show)

Just wanted to share my WOT mania  :D

Here are some previews for it:
A Memory of Light by Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YOJiyFf8gW4#ws)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=XrfUoR4Z9Ig# (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=XrfUoR4Z9Ig#)


Title: Re: Books
Post by: froome19 on January 03, 2013, 18:26
And: The Wheel of Time: The Last Chapter (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ja3QAV_t3vs#ws)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: kabloemski on January 05, 2013, 11:15
"@faydra_deon: j. 100 free #ebooks on Barnes & Noble: http://t.co/pyjT0jKI #nook --Updated regularly to remove non-freebies"

http://ebookblitz.com/free-ebooks-on-barnes-noble/#9
Title: Re: Books
Post by: esafosfina on January 05, 2013, 17:24
Re-reading Sebastian Faulks - Human Traces. Deals with early psychiatry, the divides caused by the first war, and the interplay between the two main protagonists. At 600+ pages it's not for the faint-hearted but is never tedious... heartily recommended.

Also just finishing the Russel Mockridge book...

I've an annoying habit of reading up to three or four books at a time...
Title: Books
Post by: kabloemski on January 06, 2013, 06:17
I've an annoying habit of reading up to three or four books at a time...

Me too - and I want to stop!
Title: Books
Post by: kabloemski on January 06, 2013, 06:17
"@alaindebotton: Writing a book is like telling a joke and having to wait 2 years to know whether or not it was funny"
Title: Re: Books
Post by: L'arri on April 18, 2013, 08:41
It is a true lie that "everyone's got a book in them". Equally, books are very fashionable at the moment. Everyone's writing one, it seems.

If you could write a book, what would be the title and subject?

Armando Iannucci made a mockumentary years ago which sounded like a good book title:
Clinton: His Struggle With Dirt  :lol

If we each wrote one, what would it be?

Just Someguy, Tales From The Cryptic
A compendium of JSG's truisms, unintelligible prophesies and newly-minted phrases like "head shacking".

Larry Viste, You Don't Have To Be Doping To Work Here But It Helps
How studying the effects of doping led one man to buy, sell and use dope himself in unwholesome quantities, thereby proving that one addiction begets another.

Florrie LaFleur, Contador Cookbook
The triple double Tour and double single Giro winner from Pinto shares his recipes with his number one fanette. By telephone.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: L'arri on November 18, 2014, 21:22
Off-season also means resurrecting a lot of deeply unsuccessful threads.

I'm reading Isabel Allende's House of the Spirits at the moment, which so far bears a vague resemblance to Marquez' beyond brilliant One Hundred Years Of Solitude. The story traces the progress of four generations of a family against the backdrop of Chilean history.

I just finished The Master and Margarita, a novel written in secret by Mikhail Bulgakov during Stalin's rule. Discovered later and published posthumously, it is a profound work about how society can constrain itself. It tells a kaleidoscopic tale of a frustrated writer and his muse (both of whom we don't even meet for at least half the book), the trial and death of Jesus Christ (the subject of the aforementioned writer's masterpiece) and the often hilarious chaos generated by a visit to Moscow from the Devil and his assistants (this subplot inspired the Rolling Stones' Sympathy for the Devil).

The latter book I want to dwell on a moment longer because it is one of those seemingly few books that possesses the capacity to touch one deeply. It is a masterpiece and daunting in the extraordinary width of its scope but it also manages to be brave, sincere, intimate, funny and human.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: froome19 on November 18, 2014, 21:32
For what its worth.. I just started:
Spoiler (hover to show)

And yes I am not sure why I haven't read it previously.. I guess I simply couldn't be bovered..
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Leadbelly on December 28, 2014, 20:01
Did you ever finish it Froome?

I've finished by first Xmas book - Changabang. It was about the first ascent of the aforementioned mountain, by an Anglo-Indian team.

(http://www.dougscottmountaineering.co.uk/cms/wp-content/uploads/prints/0215-in.jpg)

Despite that picture, it seemed quite a straightforward climb (they took the "easy" route). They seemed to have more difficulty in getting to the (advanced) base camp than getting up it.

The most interesting bit was a short passage about their cook - Sherpa Norbu. He'd seen it all from the 1930s onwards, being in groups with Ruttledge, Dyhrenfurth and Tilman amongst others. Tilman especially, seemed to have made a very deep impression on him. Needless to say, he thought the current climbers (as of then - 1974) were a bunch of namby-pambies in comparison.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: L'arri on December 29, 2014, 09:12
I'm reading Sartre's Nausea at the moment, the latest in a series of "let's read that and see what all the Fus is about" books.

So far, before the philosophy bit gets started, I find myself rather disturbed by the protagonist's monologue, which describes his withdrawn life in a tedious and overly analytical fashion. Sounds too similar to my current situation. :lol
Title: Re: Books
Post by: L'arri on December 29, 2014, 14:22
It was almost certainly an urban legend with no basis in fact - that is to say, the sort of thing people read in a Thomas Harris novel and quote for truth at lowbrow dinner parties or in drowsy, polish-kneed classrooms until it becomes fact - but one occasionally hears (at lowbrow dinner parties or in drowsy, polish-kneed classrooms) about a list of library lendings that triggers some alarm bells at Millbank or Quantico.

This means that if you were to borrow Catcher In The Rye, L'Etranger, The Collector, Crime and Punishment (and perhaps others that have slipped my mind) from your friendly local book repository within an 18-month period, that is to say MPCC-style, you would automatically earn the right to a visit from a locally posted G-Man to sniff your trash.

With that lengthy preamble, I must say that Nausea is shaping up nicely to join this particular bracket of loner literature and thus, although I have not read each of these within a single, contiguous period of 18 months, I may soon be the subject of such a visit.

Except that, as lowbrow dinner partygoers and polish-kneed pupils would no doubt concede once slapped in the face with the cold fish of obvious, there are fewer and fewer public libraries receiving sufficient funding to retain a consistent library service in our cash-strapped times, so I did not borrow any of these books and therefore deftly deflected the scrutiny of public sector snoopers.

As a potential candidate for the title of alleged serial killer, I know only too well that library funding is problematic because I bought my friend a couple of rare (and thus second hand) editions of seminal Stafford Beer texts for Christmas and in the flyleaf one of them was stamped and labelled as the property of the library of the presumably now defunct Economics department of the recently rebranded University of Glamorgan. My friend was full of joy on receipt but I sincerely hope she does not inherit two decades worth of overdue fines.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Vimto on January 01, 2015, 21:03
Wow! It's posts like that that make me wish we had a WTF! button as well as a like button.....
(Meant in a good way, of course..)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: DJW on January 16, 2015, 15:10
Just finished the Goldfinch by Donna Tartt - phenomenal. One of the best sellers in the UK at the moment, couldn't recommend it enough.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Leadbelly on January 16, 2015, 16:15
I really enjoyed The Little Friend (that's the one I'd recommend to people), but when I tried The Secret History, I just couldn't get into it. Unsympathetic characters and I struggled to get into the meat of the story. So that's made me a bit wary of The Goldfinch.

Based on my unscientific study she has a 50% hit rate.  :P

It's a very long book too. I think I'll wait till I see a cheap second-hand copy on Amazon.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: L'arri on January 16, 2015, 16:34
I really enjoyed The Little Friend (that's the one I'd recommend to people), but when I tried The Secret History, I just couldn't get into it. Unsympathetic characters and I struggled to get into the meat of the story. So that's made me a bit wary of The Goldfinch.

Based on my unscientific study she has a 50% hit rate.  :P

It's a very long book too. I think I'll wait till I see a cheap second-hand copy on Amazon.

I haven't read Tartt but I know the synopses of several of her novels and they seem pretty intense in a good way. I was told by one avid reader that she has a habit of writing "strange endings". Intriguing.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Leadbelly on March 05, 2015, 22:32
Does the Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers omnibus count as a book?

(http://feelingmyage.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/ffcheadphones.jpg)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Joelsim on May 27, 2015, 10:09
I know it's not a book, but if you have Netflix then Clean Spirit is on there at the moment. Watched it last night and enjoyed it. Brief synopsis is it's a documentary following Argos Shimano during the 2013 TdF.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Ram on December 22, 2015, 11:18
Strangers who came home: John Lazenby

Brilliant author and a fine book about the 1878 Australian tours of NZ & later the British Isles (their first). Possibly the most important tour in hindsight. Only criticism being, when reading a chronicle I'd like to see scorecards, and not just match reports, like Bodyline Autopsy.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Michielveedeebee on January 01, 2016, 09:12
For the fantasyfans with a lot of time: The Malazan Book of the Fallen series by Steven Erikson is phenomenal!

For those with less time: The Broken Empire Trilogy by Mark Lawrence is also a fun read.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Leadbelly on January 26, 2016, 22:15
For the fantasyfans with a lot of time: The Malazan Book of the Fallen series by Steven Erikson is phenomenal!

I've read the first novel, but tell me, do the same characters make reappearances further on in the series? I've bought the second part (not got round to reading it yet), but I'm led to believe that it's a completely different set of people in it.

Anyway I was lucky enough at Xmas to receive the omnibus edition of mountain travel books by Bill Tilman. There's seven in total and in later ones he goes on Everest expeditions, finds a way into the Nanda Devi sanctuary, travels the Wakhan Corridor etc etc.

However I'm only on the first one at the moment and it deals with his time in Africa after WWI. Some of the stuff he does is very much of it's time and won't be everyone's cup of tea - there's the obvious colonial factor, he enjoys hunting (including a rather disgusting/hilarious story about trying to get an elephant foetus preserved and sent back to Europe) and some of his descriptions of the native population leave a lot to be desired (his use of the phrase boys to describe his/his friends employees on the farms does grate).

His more pleasing exploits include ascents with Eric Shipton of Kilimanjaro, Mount Kenya, the Mountains of the Moon and to end the book he decides to cycle (on his own) all the way from Kampala in Uganda through part of the Belgian Congo, French Equatorial Africa and ending up at the coast in French Cameroon (he says they built very good roads in the Belgian Congo, much better than in the French colonies).

If you can look past the negative points, he does tell a canny tale and with a neat turn of phrase.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: stereojet on January 27, 2016, 08:32
I'm currently reading A Brief History of Seven Killings. While it's not brief, and I'm sure there are more than seven dead bodies in it, it's fantastic.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Echoes on January 27, 2016, 12:13
I'm reading "Oui ! La Belgique existe, je l'ai rencontrée" by Jo Gérard (JM Collet, 1988) ["Yes, Belgium Exists I've Met Her"]. Jo Gérard is a famous Belgian historian who's also constantly advocated for Belgium reunion against separatists of both sides. This is a response to François Périn, a Walloon who advocated for Walloon reunion with France. Gérard showed that Belgium has had a homogenious existence that dated long before the independence of 1830. The Burgundians federalized the territory in the 15th century along with the present-day Netherlands and there had already been glimpses of it with the city revolts of the 14th century.


Because of that book I've postponed my reading of Raymond Chandler's The Big Sleep but it's for certain Chandler is the best novelist to ever come from the USA. I'd even say that Chandler saved American literature, which is definitely not up to par with the French, Italian or Russian literature. That's Crystal clear. Oh and also the best adaptation of the Big Sleep is the Michael Winner's, starring Robert Mitchum and not the Howard Hawks.

Also just finished the reading of Georges Simenon's "Le président". Book that Henri Verneuil magnificently adapted for the cinema, starring Jean Gabin and with the dialogues of Michel Audiard. It's amazing how many French films are based on novels by BELGIAN Georges Simenon. Simenon and Audiard really tought me how society works.  :)
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Michielveedeebee on January 27, 2016, 15:42
I've read the first novel, but tell me, do the same characters make reappearances further on in the series? I've bought the second part (not got round to reading it yet), but I'm led to believe that it's a completely different set of people in it.


They return, oh do they return. :-x :cool
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Ram on June 28, 2016, 05:32
The Dry by Jane Harper

Really promising, and only halfway through it.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: LaVelocipede on October 27, 2016, 13:28
5 MORE DAYS UNTIL THE GREATEST FANTASY EPIC OF ALL TIME COMES TO AN END.



Robert  Jordan's Wheel of Time series: The final volume, the 14th of the series will be released on the 8th of January. I have spent the last couple of months re reading the series and am now prepared for the release. I have read a wide range of fiction books and nearly all the great fantasy and sci-fi releases but this one for me tops them all.

He died in 2007 whilst writing the last of his books. His wife then chose an up and coming and generally regarded as the soon to be next thing in the world of fantasy author Brandon Sanderson to write the last book. It was so extensive though that after seeing all the notes Sanderson was forced to publish it as 3 books.

The last one entitled A Memory of Light is to be released this Tuesday. The speculation on the book has been overwhelming. Over the past couple of weeks I have immersed myself in it and I must admit that the detail which Jordan wrote with meant that the plot becomes so intriguing and bewitching as you analyse every single individual word. Sanderson has not a speck on Jordan and admittedly he does not have the unique genius, attention to detail and ability to define a character which Jordan has but he was aided by extensive notes and even written excerpts from Jordan written before he passed away.

Also what I find fascinating is the remarkable depth of the series. Specifically the characters are based on so many parallels from many different inspirations and each of them are integrated within the series so effortlessly.
Jordan ,who's real name was Oliver Rigney, wrote the last chapter and it promises to be
Spoiler (hover to show)

Just wanted to share my WOT mania  :D

Here are some previews for it:
A Memory of Light by Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YOJiyFf8gW4#ws)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=XrfUoR4Z9Ig# (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=XrfUoR4Z9Ig#)
(Aware that post is three years old)
I'm on book eleven - THEY ARE SO GOOD.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Leadbelly on March 19, 2018, 20:14
They return, oh do they return. :-x :cool

I returned to the (Malazan) series a few months back to give it another go and I'm glad I did. Since I couldn't remember enough from the first book, I had to go back and re-read it first, but I'm motoring my way through them now (relatively speaking) as I'm coming towards the end of Book 5.

It is a bit daunting with every new book that you get this whole new range of characters, but he somehow manages to get you interested in them in a pretty short time.

Book 5 (Midnight Tide) is a bit different from the others I have to say. Tehol and Bugg (and a few of the other characters in that arc) feel like they've stepped out of the Pratchett/Adams/Python ouevre. I'm not saying it's better or worse for that, but it feels a bit strange compared to the seriousness of the earlier (or should that be later!) subject matter.
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Drummer Boy on March 25, 2018, 00:29
It is a true lie that "everyone's got a book in them". Equally, books are very fashionable at the moment. Everyone's writing one, it seems.

If we each wrote one, what would it be?

Larry Viste, You Don't Have To Be Doping To Work Here But It Helps
How studying the effects of doping led one man to buy, sell and use dope himself in unwholesome quantities, thereby proving that one addiction begets another.
Icarus! You had it in you all along. They owe you royalties!  :P
Title: Re: Books
Post by: Drummer Boy on March 25, 2018, 00:37
Just finished (reading) this one:

(http://www.ellsberg.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/DoomsdayMachine.png)
More info here:
http://www.ellsberg.net (http://www.ellsberg.net)

If you're unfamiliar with just how close, on several occasions, we've come to total, global annihilation, you might be surprised by some of the revelations contained within this book. With unprecedented access to classified information, Ellsberg delves into much more than the just the nuclear implications of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the Cold War that followed, but also provides disturbing insights into the "conventional" bombing raids that preceded the use of atomic weapons, including the horrific air assaults (and the subsequent firestorms) that were suffered by Tokyo as well as the devastatingly cruel attacks on Hamburg and Dresden in the European conflict.

Given the current geopolitical climate of the Trump/Putin/Kim era, this book is as relevant as ever, as it also takes into account these contemporary leaders and the many factors of today's conflicts with which they all must contend.

Considering the vast amount of nuclear weapons in circulation today, and the hairbreadth's away from setting them in motion that we've come—on multiple occasions—the most surprising aspect of this book is the fact that any humans still exist on this planet to even read it.

Daniel Ellsberg is such an extraordinarily pivotal figure in 20th Century history, and yet the full impact of his work and contributions seems to go largely unnoticed, or at least not nearly acknowledged to the extent that it should. More than any other singular individual, his efforts weighed heavily on bringing an end not only to the Vietnam war, but the Nixon presidency itself.
This recently released documentary on his life is well worth watching:
The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers  (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1319726/)

You may, or may not, be able to view it for free directly from PBS here:
http://www.pbs.org/pov/mostdangerousman/video/daniel-ellsberg-the-pentagon-papers-and-the-new-york-times/ (http://www.pbs.org/pov/mostdangerousman/video/daniel-ellsberg-the-pentagon-papers-and-the-new-york-times/)