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Dim

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The Beginners Guide to the Classics
« on: January 09, 2013, 15:08 »

Loretto Petrucci at
Milan San Remo 1952
Originally Published on Teamskyfans.com
From the forests of the Ardennes, to the “falling leaves” of Lombardy, via the cobbles of Roubaix  the “Classics” are the pinnacle of one day racing in the cycling calendar. For many they are the greatest and most prestigious races of the year, ahead even of the Grand Tours. With few exceptions, all of the greats of cycling have made their mark on the classics; Merckx and Coppi, through the great Irishman Sean Kelly, and Eric Zabel to modern day stars such as Tom Boonen, and young Brit Mark Cavendish. The classics are the pinnacle of many riders careers. Once you've won one, you can live off the stories for the rest of your career. From the historic “monument” classics of San Remo, Roubaix, Flanders, Liege and Lombardia, to the minor classics, we take you on a journey through what to expect this season.

*be Omloop Het Nieuwsblad - Late February*2013
Omloop Het Nieuwsblad (previously known as Omloop Het Volk) is a European semi classic single day cycle race held in the Belgian province of East Flanders. The race was first held in 1945, organised by the newspaper Het Volk in response to Het Nieuwsblad’s Classic Ronde van Vlaanderen. The Omloop, with the start and finish in Ghent, uses many of the climbs in the Ronde van Vlaanderen, and is for that reason often used in preparation for the bigger event. Omloop Het Nieuwsblad is the opening event on the Belgian cycling calendar and is usually held on the last Saturday in February or the first in March. It is characterised by cold weather and short cobbled climbs. Recent winners include Phillipe Gilbert and Thor Hushovd. The race is followed the next day by the single day race Kuurne-Brussels-Kuurne*2013 with many of the riders competing in both.

*it Strade Bianche - Early March
Originally held in October Strade Bianche moved to the spring in its second year, when it also became longer and featured an additional sector of the now famous white gravel. Characterised by its white gravel roads, in the dry its a dust bowl of gravel and chalk, and in the wet a slimy mudbath.
Not dissimilar to its cousin, Paris Roubaix, the race features long stretches of flat, bumpy roads, but where the Hell of the North has “pave” the Eroica has sharp gravel, and then Flanderesque short sharp climbs of up to 10%.  A typical hard mans race,  It may only be seven years old but, with its parcour, and a winners list that reads Kolobnev, Cancellara, Lofkvist, Iglinsky, Gilbert, Cancellara, Strade Bianche has a rightful place in the season as a semi-classic.*2013

*it Giro del Lazio/Roma Maxima - Early March

Cobbles of the Appian Way

Is back on the Calendar. Provisionally set for Saturday March 2nd, the day before Strade Bianche to form a double header of Italian spring classics. The race dropped off the calendar after 2008 (started in 1933), but RCS are looking to bring it back. Not definite yet, but they have the date saved.
If it goes ahead it will take in a section of cobbles from the Appian Way cobbled Roman road that runs from  Rome to Brindisi*2013

*it Milan San Remo - March*2012
The earliest true classic of the season and the first of the five “Monuments” - Held in late March it is often referred to as the Sprinters Classic with its sister race, the Giro De Lombardia in the Autumn

Cavendish pips Haussler in 2009
to win the 100th Milan San Remo
being the climbers classic. Raced over 298km it is the longest of the one day races, and although generally won by a sprinter, a rider needs to strength to get over the climbs of Cipressa and Poggio, two hills that many times have foiled the sprinters who failed to stay in the front group. Good examples include Laurent Jalabert and Maurizio Fondriest escaping in 1995 and staying away to the finish. In 2003, Paolo Bettini attacked with several riders who all stayed away and in 2006 Filippo Pozzato and Alessandro Ballan attacked on the last hill and stayed away. In 2009 the race was won by Briton Mark Cavendish who surprised many, his Columbia team supporting him over the hills. He produced a last gasp sprint to pip Haussler on the line by a matter of inches.

*be Dwars Door Vlaanderen - Mid March*2012
Dwars Door Vlaanderen is a minor classic race in Belgium, Traditionally, it is the start of the Flemish cycling week, with the Brabantse Pijl, the Three Days of De Panne and the Ronde van Vlaanderen. Dwars door Vlaanderen has always been contested on a Wednesday, a week and a half before the Ronde van Vlaanderen or Tour of Flanders, the second of the seasons “Monuments”

*be E3 Prijs Harelbeke - late march *2012
A semi classic race in Flanders, the E3 classic is traditionally preparation for the Ronde van Vlaanderen. The route is shorter but many of the famous climbs are tackled. The conditions are also comparable as cobbles, wind and climbs decimate the bunch. The route takes a large lap around East Flanders including 12 hills.

*be Gent Wevelgem - Late March*2012
The race traditionally fells between the Tour Of Flanders, and Paris Roubaix but in 2010 moved to just before Flanders giving a real glut of races before the second monument of the season. Often referred to as a sprinters classic due to its predominantly flat terrain, it is in fact rarely won by a sprinter, as it also takes in the difficult cobbled climb of the Kemmelberg which causes splits in the bunch. The toughest of the sprinters fight to hang in the lead group to battle it out at the end.

*be Tour of Flanders - Late March/Early April*2012
The Tour of Flanders, or Ronde van Vlaanderen is the second of the Monuments, the most important

Peter Van Petegem leads Frank
Vandenbroucke and Johan Museeuw
on his way to victory in 1999
race in the Belgian calendar and along with Paris-Roubaix the most important single day race in the cycling year. Everything that makes racing in Belgium great is here - sharp hills, cobbles, legions of flag-waving fans and a chance to see the very best racers fighting it out over the energy-sapping 261.5km route.  The Tour of Flanders’s route is littered with climbs that have become legendary in the sport, including 6 climbs, the Nokereberg, Paterberg, Koppenberg, Steenbeekdries, and the Taaienberg (Up to 2012 it also included the famous Muur)  that are pure cobbles,  Even the toughest riders can find their dreams lying broken and bleeding in the muddy cobbles.  Mountains they may not be, but the sheer pace at which the riders hits the climbs means that the inexperienced can find themselves blowing spectacularly and being shelled out of the back of the race. It's not unusual to see bunches of riders forced to dismount and awkwardly clatter up the fearsome Koppenberg - one of the only times you'll ever see a pro get off his bike and walk. It's a war of attrition, and only the hard men survive to the finish. Won last year by Tom Boonen, it is the race every Belgian dreams of winning and the one that, for them, means lifelong respect and honour if  they do.

*be Schelderprijs- Early April*2012
Falling between the tour of Flanders and Paris Roubaix is Schedlerprijs. Traditional it fell the wednesday after Roubaix but in 2010 moved between the two monuments taking the place of Gent-Wevelgem. Typically a sprinters race it covers approximately 200km, including three 15km curcuits of Schoten to finish the race. The route includes seven cobbled sections of between 1300 and 3000 metres each. It is the oldest of the Flandrian races having first been contested in 1907, originally starting and finishing in Antwerp.

*fr Paris Roubaix - Early April*2012

Bruno Wojtineck, Sean Kelly,
Paris-Roubaix 1986
Photo Lionel Préau
A Sunday in Hell, Hell of the North, L'Enfer du Nord, whatever you want to call it, for many, it is the greatest single race in cycling. 28 sections of cobbles, many of them surviving since the time of Napoleon, leave the riders battered, bruised, dusty and frequently caked in mud.

Two time winner, Sean Kelly said that it was the hardest race of all... and the most beautiful to win. It was so difficult that it hurt him to pee for three days afterwards. The first edition started back in 1896, according it as one of the oldest races in professional cycling.

Only the two world wars stopped it. But, it's endured for its passion for the hardship on the pave. In the aftermath of the first world war, plans began for the race's return in 1919. Victor Breyer, correspondent for the newspaper L'Auto, went with cyclist Eugene Christophe and toured the devastated bombed out countryside. Afterwards, Breyer coined the famous phrase: "l'enfer du Nord” or the “Hell of the North."

Quote from: Jean Stablinski
In the mine, when the cage takes you 500 meters underground, you don't know for sure if you'll ever come back up. Arenberg is like a descent into the coal mine. If you start to think of the danger you won't even go there.

Nowadays, the dirt paths are use for the occasional farm machinery but, on this special Sunday they are reserved for a bunch of determined cyclists. There are 28 cobbled sections with the Trouee d'Arenberg or the trench of Arenberg as one of the most difficult to negotiate due to the unusually large pave. It is here that 2400 meters of cobbles were laid in time of Napoleon. Symbolic and dramatic, it's the spot that decides the race. Eddy Merckx said, "This isn't where you win Paris-Roubaix but it's where you can lose it." If you can negotiate the cobbles, the most unique finish awaits -  one and a half laps of the famous ancient velodrome in Roubaix - and the trophy of a large cobble mounted on wood for the victor.
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  • « Last Edit: February 22, 2013, 16:33 by Dim »

    Dim

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    Re: The Beginners Guide to the Classics
    « Reply #1 on: January 09, 2013, 15:08 »
    The Ardennes Classics

    Held over a week in April the three Ardennes classics, Amstel Gold, the midweek Fleche Valonne, and Liège-Bastogne-Liège along with the cobbled classics of Belgium and France form the “Spring Classics”. Three days before Amstel gold is the minor classic Brabantse Pijl

    The northern classics give you mud, rain and cobbles,, the Ardennes classics give you leafy forests and hills, a lot of hills. As Gent Wevelgem, Flanders and Roubaix form a cobbled triple, so Amstel, Fleche Wallone and Liege form the Ardennes triple (and later in the season - 'Trittico Lombardo' Tre Valli Varesine, Coppa Ugo Agostoni and Coppa Bernocchi and 'Trittico di Autunno' with Milano–Torino, Giro del Piemonte and Giro di Lombardia.)

    *nl Amstel Gold Race - Mid April
    The biggest Dutch race of the year held over a gruelling 258km is probably also the most confusing race on the calendar, the route resembling tangled spaghetti looping around the Dutch countryside.  It is probably also the most dangerous race of the year, with cars, scattered around the course due to the lack of garages in Holland, and a wealth of street furniture, road signs, and bollards to be avoided. That’s before you even consider the gruelling 31 climbs, including the  20% Keutenberg, and the wealth of riotously drunk fanatical fans that line the roadside.  The course loops around on itself visiting the same spots several times, adding to the confusion. A true climbers classic suiting a real whippet, and no surprise that the list of previous winners include Cunego, Di Luca, Frank Schleck and Vinokourov.

    *be La  Fleche Wallone - Mid April
    The first Belgian Ardennes classic and held between Amstel Gold and Leige, (originally it was held the day before Liege-Bastogne-Liege). The 199.5 km event starts in Charleroi and heads east to Huy, where the riders do three laps of a tough circuit including the steep Mur de Huy (The wall of Huy) climb, with several sections steeper than 15%. The finish is at the top of the Mur after the third ascent. Another climbers classic having been won recently by Rebellin (3 times), Valverde, and Danilo Di Luca.


    Phillipe Gilbert foils the
    Shleck brothers in 2011
    *be Liege Bastogne Liege
    Liège-Bastogne-Liège is the fourth “Monument” of the season, the third of the Ardennes Classics and the oldest of the classics having first been held in 1892.

    The race follows a straightforward 95 km route from Liège to Bastogne, and a winding 163 km route back to Liège. The second half contains most of the climbs, such as the Stockeu, Haute-Levée, La Redoute, Saint-Nicolas and the Col de Forges before finishing in the northern Liège suburb of Ans. The many hills give opportunities for riders to attack, and the race often rewards aggressive riders.

    A true climbers classic with four climbs in the final fifty kilometres including the final climb, the 11%  Côte de Saint-Nicolas just a few kilometres from the finish.

    *es Clasica Ciclista San Sebastian - late July
    The forgotten classic, coming just after the Tour de France when many riders have other things on their minds, The Clásica de San Sebastián is famous for its spectacular views of the coastline and its winding, undulating terrain which strongly favours aggressive riding. The current race route is approximately 227 kilometres in length and includes the tough Alto de Jaizkibel climb at around the 200 kilometre mark. This is usually the decisive point of the race. San Sebastian is followed a few weeks later by the post Tour Vattenfall Cyclassics

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  • « Last Edit: January 10, 2013, 15:04 by Dim »

    Dim

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    Re: The Beginners Guide to the Classics
    « Reply #2 on: January 09, 2013, 15:08 »
    The Autumn Classics

    August to October see’s the Autumn Classics a collection of minor one day races historically culminating in the Classic Paris Tours, and then the final monument of the season the Giro di Lombardia. Most of the races are set in Italy and all form a strong part of the cycling heritage in the country. In 2012 the UCI as a result of the Tour of Beijing moved the Giro di Lombardia or 'Il Lombardia' to Mid September removing the traditional run up of semi classics prior to the final monument of the season.

    *it Trittico Lombardo - August
    The Trittico Lombardo is a series of three races, over consecutive days in the Lombardy region of Italy. The first and most prestigious of the three, Tre Valli Varesine, in Varese was first raced in 1919, and even continued through the second world war with the exception of 1943 and 1944. The following day sees the Coppa Ugo Agostoni. Held since 1946 it is raced in honour of Ugo Agostoni, winner of Milan San Remo in 1914 (and winner of two stages of the Giro d'Italia) who was killed during World War Two. The final of the three races is the Coppa Bernocchi, again first raced in 1919, it takes place around Legnano in Lombardy.
     
    *fr *be Paris Brussels - Early September
    Paris-Brussels was first run in 1893 as an amateur event over two days. The race was a Spring Classic towards the end of April, between Paris-Roubaix and Gent-Wevelgem. The event lost its prestige in 1966 when the Dutch promoted the Amstel Gold Race. The race was also affected by traffic problems and was not run between 1967 and 1972. The race starts at Soissons in Picardie, 85 km north-east of Paris, although prior to 1996 the race started in Noyon and during the 1980s in Senlis. The race is level, but towards the end there are cobbled climbs such as the Alsemberg, Mont Saint Roch and the Keperenberg.The race suffers though being in competition against the Vuelta which tends to draw the better sprinters.

    *it Giro di Lombardia - Mid September

    World Number 1 Joaquim Rodriguez
    winning Lombardia in 2012
    Traditionally the final race of the year, but in 2012 after 100 years the race moved to September. the Giro di Lombardia, Ill Lombardia,  La Foglie Morte, loosely translated into English as the Race of the Falling Leaves, Lombardia is the fifth and final monument of the traditional cycling calendar and dates from 1905. Alfredo Binda holds the record of four career victories. The course has varied over time, and for many years finished in the Città Alta of Bergamo. Recently,  the course has begun in Varese, tracing out a mis-shapen clover leaf around Lake Como, and finishing in Como. Three climbs, the Madonna del Ghisallo, the Civiglio, and the San Fermo di Battaglia punctuate the finale. Damiano Cunego and Paolo Bettini each won two of the last four editions, and the course favours a punchy climber who can attack the short hills and win the flat sprint at the finish.

    *it Coppa Sabatini  Gran Premio città di Peccioli -  early October
    Set in the Pisa region of Italy the race was first staged in 1952. Eight laps of a lumpy circuit are undertaken before two final laps of a smaller circuit and the uphill finish. Previous winners include Ricardo Ricco, Gianni Bugno and Jan Ullrich. A true all rounders course.

    *fr Paris Bourges -  Early October
    First run in 1913 as an amateur event, Paris Bourges is one of the oldest races on the French calendar and for many years was the final race in the French Cycling Cup. A sprinters race and often a warmup for Paris Tours recent winners include Andrei Greipel and Bernhard Eisel.

    *it Giro dell'Emilia -  Early October
    Considered by many one of the most important races in the Italian road season, the Giro dell'Emilia takes place over 200km with a big climb 100km in followed by five small circuits with an uphill finish. A climbers classic, Robert Gesink triumphed in 2009, and 2010. It is followed the next day by its sister event the GP Bruno Beghelli. Emilia has lost its status somewhat since it Lombardia moved to an earlier date.

    *fr Paris Tours - Early October
    Run just before the final monument of the season, the Giro Di Lombardia, Paris - Tours is a true sprinters classic covering  250 almost flat kilometres between  St-Arnould-en-Yvelines and Tours and traditionally ends in a bunch sprint although there are occasional breakaway victors.
    Paris Tours is another race to have suffered due to the move of Il Lombardia. The Autumn Double was achieved by  winning  Paris–Tours and the following weeks Giro di Lombardia. The races are totally different - Lombardia is for climbers - making the double almost impossible. Only four ever achieved it: Philippe Thys (Belgium) in 1917, van Looy in 1959, Dutchman Jo de Roo twice (1962-1963) and  more recently, Belgian Philippe Gilbert in 2009.

    *it Milano Torino - Mid October
    Run over 199 kilometres between the Italian cities of Milan and Torino, it was first run in 1896 making it the oldest of all the Italian classic races. Despite the undulating terrain, this is one of the fastest of all the classics, the record being a shade under 46kph average in 1999 by Markus Zberg. Previous winners include Danilo Di Luca and Michele Bartoli. The race is followed the following day by Gran Piemonte,  traditionally the final warmup race for Lombardy. These three races together formed the Trittico di Autunno (The Autumn Triptych/Autumn Treble)




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  • « Last Edit: January 10, 2013, 15:05 by Dim »

    LukasCPH

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    Re: The Beginners Guide to the Classics
    « Reply #3 on: January 09, 2013, 18:20 »
    Splendid overview. :win
    Can't wait for my most favourite weeks of the year...

    Only one small correction: As far as I know, the Alsemberg is not cobbled, but a normal asphalt road (if it's the same Alsemberg that the Brabantse Pijl used to finish on).
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    Dim

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    Re: The Beginners Guide to the Classics
    « Reply #4 on: January 09, 2013, 18:35 »
    I think the Alsemberg is one of those ones with cobbled pavements and small strips of cobbles on it. Frank Vandenbroucke attacked on a cobbled bit in 1995 http://autobus.cyclingnews.com/results/archives/sept95/parisb.html Not a true cobbled hill, but patches I think..
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: The Beginners Guide to the Classics
    « Reply #5 on: January 10, 2013, 10:13 »
    Well, when I rode up the final hill of the Brabantse Pijl (in Alsemberg) in 2007 there were no cobbles that I can remember on the hill itself. According to Dutch Wikipedia (the quickest source I could find), there's a short section of flat cobbles considered to be part of the hill, but I can't remember that either. And I don't think the local authorities would lay down a stretch of completely new cobbles just for the sake of Paris-Bruxelles when the race doesn't even finish in their town anymore.

    Anyway, unless we get l'arriviste to go on a ride and check, the best way to know for sure is to watch Paris-Bruxelles...
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  • L'arri

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    Re: The Beginners Guide to the Classics
    « Reply #6 on: January 10, 2013, 20:06 »
    Well, when I rode up the final hill of the Brabantse Pijl (in Alsemberg) in 2007 there were no cobbles that I can remember on the hill itself. According to Dutch Wikipedia (the quickest source I could find), there's a short section of flat cobbles considered to be part of the hill, but I can't remember that either. And I don't think the local authorities would lay down a stretch of completely new cobbles just for the sake of Paris-Bruxelles when the race doesn't even finish in their town anymore.

    Anyway, unless we get l'arriviste to go on a ride and check, the best way to know for sure is to watch Paris-Bruxelles...

    There are no cobbles on the hill, most of which is nothing more than a long drag. I've done that in the car. ;)

    I think the cobbles being described are those of Vanderveldelaan in the flat part of Alsemberg village, from which the race would turn right onto Pastoor Bolsstraat and climb up to the Alsembergsesteenweg which continues to rise as far as the border with the politically controversial village of Linkebeek.
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  • Cycling is a Europe thing only and I only watch from Omloop on cause I am cool and sh*t
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    Re: The Beginners Guide to the Classics
    « Reply #7 on: January 20, 2013, 16:35 »
    I love the spring classics.  I can't decide on just one.  Together they form a story with drama a lot like a tour.  I'll the first set over the Ardennes and fall classics.  In years past I saw the classics as the end of the first half of the season and the TDF as the end.  I guess the Vuelta and WC were OT.  I thought the Ardennes and final weak of the tour as Anticlimactic!!!
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    L'arri

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    Re: The Beginners Guide to the Classics
    « Reply #8 on: February 22, 2013, 08:49 »
    <Bump for new visitors this weekend>  :D
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    Re: The Beginners Guide to the Classics
    « Reply #9 on: February 22, 2013, 09:34 »
    Return Of The Cobbles

    some great images





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  • Of course, if this turns out someday to be the industry standard integrated handlebar-computer-braking solution then I'll eat my kevlar-reinforced aerodynamic hat.

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    Re: The Beginners Guide to the Classics
    « Reply #11 on: April 12, 2013, 09:51 »


    7 key climbs of the Ardennes classics

    click on the top right to read up on the climbs listed
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