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AG

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advertising is about reaching your target audience.

If your target audience is cycling ... its kinda pointless paying huge amounts for buying ads in the New York Times.  You $ is far better spent giving money to Peter Sagan to say something nice about your brand on his twitter account, or is seen wearing/using your product on tv.

Yes cyclists know and understand that these product placements are paid for - no one genuinely expects Sagan to buy his own bikes ... but people do pay attention and are fairly brand aware when they do go shopping for bike equipment.

You are much more likely to buy a Bianchi, shell out on some speedplay pedals or a nice Giro helmet than some no-name product that you have never heard of.   

Its just about getting brand awareness ... and getting people to engage with your ads gets your ads shown more. 

Getting people to like those posts on facebook (which the fb algorithm then shows you substantially more ads in that area).   So Specialised pay facebook for sponsored ads ... but those ads are targetted towards people who have clicked on the Sagan vid or other specifics.
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Allegedly that is considered more 'genuine' than 'old-fashioned' advertising.
    I think it does depend on how cleverly (i.e. 'deceptively') they go about it. An individual probably stands a better chance of fooling their followers, but when a small group or team is touting the same product, the ruse reveals itself. I distinctly remember a few years ago when three or four Garmin riders all started tweeting, at the same time, about their new street shoes. Such excitement! The corporate product-speak was embarrassingly obvious, and it's very likely that many of the riders were followed by a crossover of the same people. It's just dumb. And insulting to one's intelligence.

    What really bothers me (although I don't think occurs too much these days) is when an individual is promoting one product, while secretly using another. This happened quite a bit in the days of steel and/or titanium frames, when a rider could easily "rebrand" a custom-made frame with decals that matched the sponsors. With carbon, and very distinctive frame shapes from manufacturer to manufacturer, I suspect that this rarely happens anymore, if at all. Other components may often have logos or names covered up or removed, but that's not too surprising.

    If I may briefly digress...
    One thing that is VERY common in the music industry is that musicians will often endorse and promote one product, while using completely different gear in the studio (or even live, if they make the effort to conceal the deception). The big problem with this is that it puts the retailer in a very awkward position, because they are now expected to promulgate the lie, even if they know better. Customers are often willing to spend significant amounts of money in the pursuit of the favorite artist's "sound" (which is generally based entirely on what they've heard on recordings) without ever realizing that what they purchase has nothing in common with what was actually used to achieve that sound.

    I used to encounter this frequently. But trying to be honest, and set a customer straight, is often met with skepticism. They're much more inclined to believe that flashy ad over the ramblings of some random dude in a shop. People just want to believe what they want to believe. It was one of the things I despise most about the retail and manufacturing industry. Most of it is a giant lie. But try to educate the consumer, and you're viewed as a heretic. Now, how would I know the truth of the matter? Because I knew. I often knew the drummers personally, or those who they worked with in the studios, often with photo or video evidence to further corroborate what I already knew to be true.

    So why would this happen? Because often the companies the make the best instruments aren't very good at artist "support." Sometimes it's because they are smaller companies without big ad budgets, and sometimes they just don't care about anything other than making quality instruments. But musicians (Spoiler alert!) tend to have huge egos, so they want, and expect, primarily two things from their sponsors: Big flashy ad campaigns to further promote themselves, and free gear, delivered on-demand, wherever they may happen to be. And in many cases, they care not one bit about much beyond that. They don't care about the product, or even about the deceptive message they send their loyal and adoring fans. Being an "equipment whore," and leap-frogging from company to company, is much more common than the few people with brand loyalty, who actually stick with the companies that supported them when they were unknown and just getting started.

    And here's another inside little secret about pro drummers in general:
    Most of them haven't the slightest clue about their instruments. Whether it's tuning or overall maintenance, they're totally ignorant. I suppose cyclist are much the same in this regard. Some grew up around bike shops and mechanics an are very adept, or maybe they just have their own keen interest in understand all the working parts. But others are notoriously ignorant of the topic and prefer to leave it all to the guys who are hired to do just that.

    But sticking with the musician theme (and I realize I'm straying further and further off-topic, but too late...)
    In my experience, guitar players tend to be MUCH more informed about their instruments than drummers. I think this is partly due to the fact that they have a much more tactile connection to their instruments, so the difference between different types of wood and various design options becomes much more apparent to them. Plus, it's much easier to walk into a shop and try out any different number of models of guitars within a very short time frame. With drummers, you rarely get to properly set-up and actually experience the drums you're buying until you get them home. It's less like buying a car where you can at least test drive it, and more like buying a plane ticket—the money is spent before you have the experience. And by then, it may not always be what you had hoped for.



    Whew. So much for saving this for another thread!  :P
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  • Carlo Algatrensig

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    I think it does depend on how cleverly (i.e. 'deceptively') they go about it. An individual probably stands a better chance of fooling their followers, but when a small group or team is touting the same product, the ruse reveals itself. I distinctly remember a few years ago when three or four Garmin riders all started tweeting, at the same time, about their new street shoes. Such excitement! The corporate product-speak was embarrassingly obvious, and it's very likely that many of the riders were followed by a crossover of the same people. It's just dumb. And insulting to one's intelligence.

    What really bothers me (although I don't think occurs too much these days) is when an individual is promoting one product, while secretly using another. This happened quite a bit in the days of steel and/or titanium frames, when a rider could easily "rebrand" a custom-made frame with decals that matched the sponsors. With carbon, and very distinctive frame shapes from manufacturer to manufacturer, I suspect that this rarely happens anymore, if at all. Other components may often have logos or names covered up or removed, but that's not too surprising.


    I don't think you can get away with it in terms of frames these days but I'm sure it probably goes on with things like saddles etc that would be much harder to spot unless you got to see the bike reasonably up close.

    I do remember a while back an English footballer who was regularly the face of Adidas in adverts in football magazines in the UK while actually playing in another manufacturers boots. It made me realise that a sportsmans endorsement of a product meant nothing especially if it was a paid for endorsement.
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  • AG

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    I do think its a bit hard for athletes in team sports - where they dont have a choice of equipment but must go with the team sponsor.    Unfortunately, that is life if you want to play sport for a living ...

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  • Caruut

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    You are much more likely to buy a Bianchi, shell out on some speedplay pedals or a nice Giro helmet than some no-name product that you have never heard of.   

    Its just about getting brand awareness ... and getting people to engage with your ads gets your ads shown more.

    This is it - it's not so much about getting people to say to themselves "Peter Sagan rides a Specialized and wears Oakleys, so I'll buy a Specialized and wear Oakleys", rather when you want to get a bike or some cool new shades you think of Specialized and Oakley as comfortably familiar names.

    Also on the ski goggles I'm pretty sure there's a fashion element to it. Ski goggles started to come into hip-hop fashion through the ATV-riding culture.

    Here's Harlem's finest A$AP Rocky rocking a Gucci version:

    His longtime collaborator A$AP Ferg also sporting the look:

    Altanta phenomenon 2 Chainz getting in on the act with the box logo edition:
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  • Caruut

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    I do think its a bit hard for athletes in team sports - where they dont have a choice of equipment but must go with the team sponsor.    Unfortunately, that is life if you want to play sport for a living ...



    From memory I think most alpine skiers ride custom-made skis, probably from some 30-person company in Switzerland I imagine, and them get them painted to look like whichever mass-market brand sponsor them.
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  • M Gee

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    Indeed. It's very odd, and I've never understood how companies could interpret some of this stuff so literally. To suggest that the video with Sagan "helping" to pack away a banner was somehow worth "nearly $300,000 to Specialized" (regardless of the level of "engagement") seems preposterous to me. Had it not been pointed out, I wouldn't have even noticed the Specialized logo on his shorts. . . .

    HEY!  :shh :shh :shh

    Knock on wood, knock on wood, knock on WOOD!  Yer gonna spoil it with logic and rational thinkin'! What are you DOIN'!

     :shh :shh :shh

    Hey, if the sponsors want to believe they're getting some value, you gotta give 'em something to show the home office!  Don't put common sense out there, all the sponsors will go away!

     :lol :lol ;)
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  • . . .He had the bit between his teeth, and he loiked the taste, mate . . .

     



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