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Re: The Kitchen
« Reply #690 on: October 29, 2015, 12:08 »
Pheasant breasts braised in cider for Saturday night

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/pheasantbreastsbrais_1003.pdf

got given the Pheasant 1st time eating and cooking them for me

will let you know how it goes
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    LaVelocipede

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #691 on: December 13, 2015, 12:52 »
    Yule Log:
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    hiero

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #692 on: January 01, 2016, 01:05 »
    This may be a good space
    :party   :party   !!

    Happy New Year everybody!

    I cooked a turkey gumbo for Xmas dinner. No photos, as gumbo is hard to photo.
    And I have always had a spot of trouble with making a good roux and getting the roux just right. Which means the gumbo is not as photogenic as Sagan or Canc or any Kardashian! 
    If you've ever had to make a roux, especially a cajun roux, you know the process is easy enough: "Stir the roux! Stir the roux!" but getting the results to be first class? THAT is another story. "Acceptable" and "edible" are easy. "Wow" is not. Of course, the roux does little to affect the taste of the gumbo, it is for the texture. So, I've always just lived with what I do. Most people love my gumbo. Put in enough chile for a little bite on the back of the palate - garlic, onion, celery, and tomato to make the cajun connection - okra - and you have a lovely, thick, deep brown, and hearty stew. What is the difference between a gumbo and a stew? Either okra or sassafras, or both. They are thickeners, but they also add some character.

    Happy New Year! And may 2016 be all that you need it to be.
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    krabkakes

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #693 on: January 01, 2016, 01:33 »
    This may be a good space
    :party   :party   !!

    Happy New Year everybody!

    I cooked a turkey gumbo for Xmas dinner. No photos, as gumbo is hard to photo.
    And I have always had a spot of trouble with making a good roux and getting the roux just right. Which means the gumbo is not as photogenic as Sagan or Canc or any Kardashian! 
    If you've ever had to make a roux, especially a cajun roux, you know the process is easy enough: "Stir the roux! Stir the roux!" but getting the results to be first class? THAT is another story. "Acceptable" and "edible" are easy. "Wow" is not. Of course, the roux does little to affect the taste of the gumbo, it is for the texture. So, I've always just lived with what I do. Most people love my gumbo. Put in enough chile for a little bite on the back of the palate - garlic, onion, celery, and tomato to make the cajun connection - okra - and you have a lovely, thick, deep brown, and hearty stew. What is the difference between a gumbo and a stew? Either okra or sassafras, or both. They are thickeners, but they also add some character.

    Happy New Year! And may 2016 be all that you need it to be.

    slow and low is how I learned to do roux.how dark a roux do you us for your gumbo? I´ve gone a little past peanut butter color but I know they can go to the color of black coffee
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    hiero

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #694 on: January 01, 2016, 01:46 »
    slow and low is how I learned to do roux.how dark a roux do you us for your gumbo? I´ve gone a little past peanut butter color but I know they can go to the color of black coffee

    I stop cooking at the medium chocolate color - just past milk chocolate - as the roux continues to darken after that. I end up somewhere from close to dark chocolate to coffee black. I try hard NOT to get to coffee black, but some of it eventually hits that stage.

    I used to cook a "dry roux" - no oil. In recent years I have changed my dietary philosophy, and fat is no longer a no-no. So, I now use something closer to traditional recipes. Oddly enough, I found the color of the roux easier to control in a dry roux.

    Next time I do it, I think I will try for stopping a p-nut butter color, and see how that works! I may also try reducing my heat. I have typically used a higher heat, as otherwise it . . . takes . . . for . . . ever . . .   :lol
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  • hiero

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #695 on: January 01, 2016, 02:16 »
    slow and low is how I learned to do roux.how dark a roux do you us for your gumbo? I´ve gone a little past peanut butter color but I know they can go to the color of black coffee

    Your question inspired me to do a little research. One of my difficulties with roux is that it does not occur in my family history. Nor have I ever worked in a kitchen that used a roux. And I did work in a few kitchens in my youth. Hated that work, tho - so did not stay there for a career. So, everything I have learned has been "on the fly". A conversation with a cajun chef here, a radio interview with somebody famous there, a cookbook, or two, etc. I've picked up what I know on my own. Sans experience.

    So, your question inspired a quick google. Search words: "a proper roux". Among other results, I get http://www.jfolse.com/fr_rouxs.htm, and, of course, wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roux. BOTH of those have something I can learn from. For instance - I should NOT be trying to get my roux so dark - as that reduces the thickening power - and this has been a weakness (that I know of, but my consumers do usually not know) of my gumbos. They are thinner than I think should be. So . . . I have adjustments to make.

    Merci!
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  • krabkakes

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #696 on: January 01, 2016, 14:48 »
    Your question inspired me to do a little research. One of my difficulties with roux is that it does not occur in my family history. Nor have I ever
    Merci!

    I always use butter and low heat. Cajun cooking has the holy trinity  of onion, celery, and bell pepper.
    are you familiar with Justin Wilson? He is on YouTube he helped inspire my cooking back before the beginning of time
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  • krabkakes

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #697 on: January 01, 2016, 22:04 »




    love the Cajun accent
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  • hiero

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #698 on: January 02, 2016, 18:40 »
    I always use butter and low heat. Cajun cooking has the holy trinity  of onion, celery, and bell pepper.
    are you familiar with Justin Wilson? He is on YouTube he helped inspire my cooking back before the beginning of time

    I actually met the man in person while he was still alive. Pre-youtube days, them. I didn't know who he was, but talking with him was an education - and I enjoyed his humor! I had begun to experiment with chilis by then - but I don't remember precisely how that all fit together. That was some time back.

    But, you know, I don't think I have ever watched any of his youtube stuff! I'll have to check it out. I had little urgency to "fix" my roux before this - but I already know how to improve the process some - so next time!
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  • hiero

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #699 on: January 02, 2016, 19:49 »
    Speaking of meeting Justin Wilson - I wish I had written up that episode in my journal - but I didn't. I wasn't writing in that period - the desire to write comes and goes. I remember him having a very fine looking young lady with him. I seem to recall that he introduced her as his niece, but you know, in retrospect, I have to wonder if that was "my niece, wink, wink!" I do recall thinking it was a personal relationship for a niece.

    And in those days I didn't even know who Bob Wills was.

    But shoot, that was so long ago, that niece could have been his current wife, and I'm mixing the memory stew and muddling things together. But, I'm pretty sure I also remember asking him what the difference was between a gumbo and a stew. Meh, too long ago - I might have asked that question of Chef Paul Prudhomme. Got to talk to him for a bit, too. That was back when I was working for the airlines - they were both passengers at one time or another. Whomever I asked, I still use that definition.
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  • krabkakes

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #700 on: January 06, 2016, 16:28 »
    well I cooked the leg of lamb. I almost blew up the house first but I cooked the leg of lamb. whilst preheating the oven I decided to turn the heat up to high and then down to the proper temp when I put the roast in. the rhe process I turned the oven off then back on without relighting the pilot light. so it sat for 45 minutes with the pilot gas on. I went to put the roast in and the oven was cold. I hadn't checked the tank before started and assumed it had run out of gas. Mike came in with a new tank as I was trying to figure out what was wrong. I went to relight the pilot and kerblam the stove exploded and I was screaming like a little bitch boy as I thought I had blown Mike up. I really have not recovered. I keep seeing that explosion over and over.
    p.s.
    the lamb was delicious
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  • Joelsim

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #701 on: January 07, 2016, 17:21 »
    Vegans over for dinner tonight.

    So it's olives, pickled garlic and black pepper Kettle Chips to appetise.

    Home-made houmous and sourdough to start.

    And mushroom and red pepper risotto for the main, cooked with diced red onion, Gavi, garlic, porcini and normal mushrooms, in a porcini and vegetable stock, with lemon zest and chives to garnish. And a side salad of finely sliced onion marinated in lemon juice with cucumber and cabbage juliennes.

    flip pudding.

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  • L'arri

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #702 on: January 07, 2016, 18:52 »
    Vegans over for dinner tonight.

    So it's olives, pickled garlic and black pepper Kettle Chips to appetise.

    Home-made houmous and sourdough to start.

    And mushroom and red pepper risotto for the main, cooked with diced red onion, Gavi, garlic, porcini and normal mushrooms, in a porcini and vegetable stock, with lemon zest and chives to garnish. And a side salad of finely sliced onion marinated in lemon juice with cucumber and cabbage juliennes.

    flip pudding.

    Good man. I love vegan cuisine. Last time I was in New York I ate nothing else, even though I'm not vegan myself. Clean, simple food done creatively.

    Wish I was there ... :P
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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #703 on: January 07, 2016, 19:06 »
    Vegans over for dinner tonight.

    So it's olives, pickled garlic and black pepper Kettle Chips to appetise.

    Home-made houmous and sourdough to start.

    And mushroom and red pepper risotto for the main, cooked with diced red onion, Gavi, garlic, porcini and normal mushrooms, in a porcini and vegetable stock, with lemon zest and chives to garnish. And a side salad of finely sliced onion marinated in lemon juice with cucumber and cabbage juliennes.

    flip pudding.
    I read "Vegans for dinner tonight" :-x :o
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    L'arri

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #704 on: January 07, 2016, 19:08 »
    I read "Vegans for dinner tonight" :-x :o

    That too. Tasty although not much meat on their bones... :P
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  • Joelsim

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #705 on: January 08, 2016, 10:39 »
    They loved the food and had a second helping. Personally I think it would have benefitted from parmigiana and butter, but hey ho.
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  • hiero

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #706 on: January 18, 2016, 00:27 »
    Exploding ovens and mushroom main dishes for vegans. We get some good stories here!

    BTW, krabby got me looking at the basics of making a roux again. I hope y'all will forgive a little ego here, but there was not much urgency to change the way I was doing things, as everyone who ate my gumbo loved it. But, for myself, it seemed like a good time for a little review.

    As I reviewed, some memories came back. It's been a long time since I first cooked gumbo, you know. You may have noticed that Justin Wilson's roux was so dark it was near black. And that is what I remember as the "proper" color. But I didn't remember why. Until I started a little research.

    So, it turns out that Neiux Oileens style of makin' roux is more like a Creole or French roux - high colored. Cajuns are country folk, and their style is a dark roux.

    On this page here: How to make a roux you will find the "school" of thinking that I learned what little I know of roux-making from. And you will notice he does it hot, fast, and dark. Since I am a "common man" sort of person, I naturally tend to favor country solutions over city stylin'. Just part of my nature.

    So, tonight I am turning all this new roux knowledge into practice. I can get chicken quarters cheap at the moment. So, I am making chicken gumbo. It is a bit "thin" in flavor at the moment. I'm working on it. The rice is cooking on the back stove.

    BTW - if you are interested, check out these other related links:
    http://www.gumbocooking.com/traditional-roux.html
    http://www.jfolse.com/fr_rouxs.htm
    https://www.southernfoodways.org/oral-history/southern-gumbo-trail/

    Update: got the flavor up. Tastin' good raght now!
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  • « Last Edit: January 18, 2016, 00:39 by hiero »

    hiero

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #707 on: January 18, 2016, 00:48 »
    Pheasant breasts braised in cider for Saturday night

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/pheasantbreastsbrais_1003.pdf

    got given the Pheasant 1st time eating and cooking them for me

    will let you know how it goes

    Hey! We never heard how it went! So? How did it go?

    I've got to say - being GIVEN pheasant - what a lovely thought! This past three winters I have been gifted venison each year, and such lovely eating! I hadn't eaten venison in many years, and I was absolutely delighted. I have completely re-examined my ideas on eating game.
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #708 on: January 18, 2016, 14:42 »
    I've got to say - being GIVEN pheasant - what a lovely thought!
    *se Swedes, I tell you. More wildlife than they themselves know what to do with. Even handing it off to Aussie immigrants. :P ;)
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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #709 on: January 18, 2016, 15:17 »
    *se Swedes, I tell you. More wildlife than they themselves know what to do with. Even handing it off to Aussie immigrants. :P ;)

    I don't have particularly fond memories of the pheasant they used to hunt around my way when I was a kid.

    Very tough even when cooked properly, that oddly sour taste and then picking occasional bits of shot out of my mouth.

    Venison was much better though. I don't eat meat nowadays but the venison was always good and I still remember that fondly.
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #710 on: January 18, 2016, 15:19 »
    picking occasional bits of shot out of my mouth.
    Ugh! :S
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  • hiero

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #711 on: January 19, 2016, 03:34 »
    I don't have particularly fond memories of the pheasant they used to hunt around my way when I was a kid.

    Very tough even when cooked properly, that oddly sour taste and then picking occasional bits of shot out of my mouth.

    Venison was much better though. I don't eat meat nowadays but the venison was always good and I still remember that fondly.

    :lol picking the shot out!  :lol

    I recall being served some bear meat on one occasion. Mmmm, yeah, tough. Odd taste. So odd I recall sneaking it back. And I was not what you can call a picky eater. Discriminating, yes.

    A lot depends on what that critter has been eating. I've had bear since that time, that I thought was very good. There are some other variables, as well. I have been told that something one generally thinks of as having a good flavor - the fat - can vary between critters. Admittedly, many of us are prejudiced against eating fat, but I don't think we will argue that it does not taste good. So I have to tell you a little tale of an unfortunate raccoon. This particular coon, a she, not that it matters much, had the bad sense to be crossing the road at the wrong time. Whether her killer bore any animosity or if it was simply an accident of timing, I do not know. She met her demise right then and there. I happened by shortly after, to see her carcass lying by the side of the road.

    Now, I had two hungry dogs who loved meat, so I thought I would give raccoon stew a try, mostly for the dogs. But I was also curious. She was still warm - so it had not been long. Anyway, it was late fall, just turning to winter. Some days it was freezing outside, some not. I took care of the necessary "funeral" arrangements, until I had a clean carcass. Since it was late fall, she had LOTS of fat. And, thinking fat is good, I threw the cleaned carcass and fat into a stew pot.

    And what I got out was the rankest mess you can ever imagine. I did not even want to touch the results. It stank. Donning rubber gloves, I took the mess and buried it behind my shed. I figure there were two causes. Raccoons, unlike pigs and cows, do not have good tasting fat in general. And, whatever this coon had been eating had definitely left its memories behind.

    I knew, from experience, that you see this with fish. I liked to fish when I was young, and the flavor of the fish is very dependent on what they've been eating and the water conditions. It just never occurred to me that this would hold true for meat type critters.

    So the dogs and I agreed. It stank. I buried it. You know what? Remember I said it was turning from fall to winter? Well, I could bury the mess because the ground had not frozen yet. But it did shortly after that. Perhaps a day or so later, the ground was frozen, and snow was on the ground. And, a couple of MONTHS later, one of our local coywolves found that mess. And dug it up. AND was eating it! The dogs got a little crazy about that. I don't have a firearm, no rifle, no handgun. But I do have an air rifle for squirrels (and it does a good job for that). So I sent a pellet whizzing over the wolf's head. Which got that wolf's attention, I garontee. That wolf lit out pretty quick.

    But kept coming back - middle of the night - when we were gone - until everything I buried had been eaten. I guess you could say that stinky mess was a high value treat for that coywolf!

    BTW, that coywolf was a beautiful critter. Grey/blond coat, thick and full for winter. A lot more grey/silver than a coyote, who tend to be mostly yellow in my experience. And the pelt was thicker than I've ever seen on a coyote. I will admit, most of my coyote experience is from the Sonoran desert regions, so their coats might not get as thick. But it still gets pretty cold down there.

    So, the dogs and me never did find out what coon might taste like. We decided we didn't want any. That coywolf laughed all the way to the bank over our foolish squeamishness!

    That gifted pheasant? It is possible that the giver knew it was likely tough and bad-tasting. Which reminds me of something that happened with my father. He and my stepmom kept some good gardens. And, they often grew zucchini. Zucchini is best picked young. As it matures and gets bigger, the insides get very woody and tough. (In case you did not already know this).

    Dad had a fella at work that would bug him for any extra garden produce he had that Dad might not want. And, you know, it is one thing to give away your excess. It is another for someone to actively seek to sponge off your hard work, when they have added no effort! So this fella at work, he thought zucchini would be a great thing!

    And Dad waited a bit, until he had a zucchini that would put a Halloween pumpkin to shame. And he gave that fella that zucchini, and told him: "I saved this big one for you, buddy! It's the biggest zucchini we've ever grown! Must be a prize-winner!"


    I think Dad told me that fella didn't pester him after that.

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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #712 on: January 19, 2016, 12:19 »
    And what I got out was the rankest mess you can ever imagine. I did not even want to touch the results. It stank. Donning rubber gloves, I took the mess and buried it behind my shed. I figure there were two causes. Raccoons, unlike pigs and cows, do not have good tasting fat in general. And, whatever this coon had been eating had definitely left its memories behind.
    The revenge of the raccoon! :D
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #713 on: January 19, 2016, 12:20 »
    Now that I have an oven, I'm going to try making shepherd's pie. Never had it before, but I think I would like it.

    Does anyone have recipes/tips/things to consider?
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  • Joelsim

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #714 on: January 19, 2016, 12:29 »
    Now that I have an oven, I'm going to try making shepherd's pie. Never had it before, but I think I would like it.

    Does anyone have recipes/tips/things to consider?

    Shepherd's Pie is with lamb mince, Cottage Pie is with beef mince.

    Try Cottage Pie with this recipe.


    2 red onions
    1 500g pack of lean steak mince
    Glass or two of red wine
    Dash of Worcester Sauce
    Teaspoon of Dijon mustard
    2 large carrots, diced into small cubes
    Small tin of tomato puree
    1 garlic clove

    For the mash topping
    3 large potatoes
    Parmegiano cheese
    Tablespoon of horseradish sauce
    Butter
    Milk


    Sweat the onions and carrots in a small amount of oil, then add mince. Once browned add the red wine and garlic, then stir in the mustard, Worcester and tomato puree. Add a touch of water if necessary, salt and pepper.

    Whilst doing this boil the potatoes, skin on until soft. Add butter, parmesan, horseradish, salt and a dash of milk, and mash.

    Spoon the potato onto the top of the mince (ensure the mince mix isn't too watery or the potato will sink).

    Oven at 170C for 30-40 mins.

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #715 on: January 19, 2016, 13:07 »
    Now that I have an oven, I'm going to try making shepherd's pie. Never had it before, but I think I would like it.

    Does anyone have recipes/tips/things to consider?

    https://www.cooked.com/uk/Margaret-Fulton/Hardie-Grant-Books/Encyclopedia-of-Food-and-Cookery/S/Shepherds-pie-recipe
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  • hiero

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #716 on: January 19, 2016, 19:20 »
    Now that I have an oven, I'm going to try making shepherd's pie. Never had it before, but I think I would like it.

    Does anyone have recipes/tips/things to consider?

    I know I would not try it with mutton. There must be a trick to preparing mutton - I tried using mutton a long time ago - never ventured to go there again. But lamb - well, I had some ground lamb from my farmer recently, it was great. Loved it! No strong or strange flavors - just good meat.

    Good luck!
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #717 on: January 19, 2016, 19:46 »
    It's in the oven.

    Didn't have mustard nor Worcester sauce - and no wine either. But tasted alright before I put it in. :)
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  • krabkakes

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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #718 on: January 19, 2016, 19:50 »
    It's in the oven.

    Didn't have mustard nor Worcester sauce - and no wine either. But tasted alright before I put it in. :)
    Julia Child would be proud
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  • krabkakes

    • Artes, Scientia, Veritas.
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    Re: The Kitchen
    « Reply #719 on: January 19, 2016, 19:51 »
    mutton if I remember correctly requires long slow moist cookery.
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