collapse


cj2002

  • Classics Winner
  • *
  • Country: pt
  • Posts: 2893
  • Liked: 3257
  • Honorary President
  • Awards: Best avatar 2012
A confession - and a cry for help
« on: July 23, 2013, 23:25 »
Here is my confession... I don't own a bike. I used to own a bike, but I outgrew it and not really having any desire to cycle very much, I never replaced it. Having begun cycling more, recently, I've been using my Dad's bike, which is an old heap of junk. It's heavy, it has fat tyres and needs, by my not very technical estimation, new chain ring, chain, gears and shifters and a saddle. Needless to say, that much investment on and old frame doesn't thrill me.

So I'm going to buy a new bike. I'm not going to spend a lot of money, but I want a decent bike to start on, with the potential to upgrade in line with my (hopefully) improving standards on the bike. Having looked around, I have come across this offer. The reviews look good, and if the fit is right I think I'm going to go for it.

So my cry for help is two-fold. Firstly, it's a case of if anyone knows any reason why me and this bike should not be joined in holy cycle-mony, let them speak now of forever hold their peace. Secondly, when I check the bike out in the flesh on Thursday (I'm still in Portugal until then), what should I be looking for.

Any other advice would be most gratefully received... The level of jargon surrounding bikes is befuddling even me, a career scientist!
  • ReplyReply
  • He shook his head sadly and told me that endemic drug use had compelled him to give up a promising career. "Even one small local race, prize was a salami, and I see doping!" - Tim Moore: Gironimo (Riding the Very Terrible 1914 Tour of Italy)

    The Hitch

    • Winner 2012 Tour de France prediction game
    • Road Captain
    • Country: pl
    • Posts: 2473
    • Liked: 841
    • Awards: 2013 Annual Prediction Game2013 CQ Ranking Vuelta Game Post of the Year 2013Race Preview of the Year 2013
    Re: A confession - and a cry for help
    « Reply #1 on: July 23, 2013, 23:34 »
    Here is my confession... I don't own a bike. I used to own a bike, but I outgrew it and not really having any desire to cycle very much, I never replaced it. Having begun cycling more, recently, I've been using my Dad's bike, which is an old heap of junk. It's heavy, it has fat tyres and needs, by my not very technical estimation, new chain ring, chain, gears and shifters and a saddle. Needless to say, that much investment on and old frame doesn't thrill me.

    So I'm going to buy a new bike. I'm not going to spend a lot of money, but I want a decent bike to start on, with the potential to upgrade in line with my (hopefully) improving standards on the bike. Having looked around, I have come across this offer. The reviews look good, and if the fit is right I think I'm going to go for it.

    So my cry for help is two-fold. Firstly, it's a case of if anyone knows any reason why me and this bike should not be joined in holy cycle-mony, let them speak now of forever hold their peace. Secondly, when I check the bike out in the flesh on Thursday (I'm still in Portugal until then), what should I be looking for.

    Any other advice would be most gratefully received... The level of jargon surrounding bikes is befuddling even me, a career scientist!

    Dont know much about bikes, but its a lot better than mine that i paid £200 for which weighs like 12kg and the wheels are a lot thicker. At £250 that looks like a bargain and really good.

    I personally don't think I would need a super bike. Quickly you learn to live with what you have. More speed is good but id rather gain speed by becoming better than by buying better gear.

    And its more of a thrill when i go down to Richmond park and can keep up with a few people on better bikes. Some just sail past like jumbo jet of course, but i cycle knowing that the easy improvent is always an option.
  • ReplyReply
  • Despite the self-serving data benders and associated propaganda to the contrary, I am led to believe that there are pockets of organised, highly sophisticated dopers, even within 'new age' cycling teams. Personally, I don't accept that the 'dark era' has ended, it has just morphed into a new guise.

    Joachim

    • National Champion
    • Country: be
    • Posts: 894
    • Liked: 290
    Re: A confession - and a cry for help
    « Reply #2 on: July 23, 2013, 23:47 »
    Here is my confession... I don't own a bike. I used to own a bike, but I outgrew it and not really having any desire to cycle very much, I never replaced it. Having begun cycling more, recently, I've been using my Dad's bike, which is an old heap of junk. It's heavy, it has fat tyres and needs, by my not very technical estimation, new chain ring, chain, gears and shifters and a saddle. Needless to say, that much investment on and old frame doesn't thrill me.

    So I'm going to buy a new bike. I'm not going to spend a lot of money, but I want a decent bike to start on, with the potential to upgrade in line with my (hopefully) improving standards on the bike. Having looked around, I have come across this offer. The reviews look good, and if the fit is right I think I'm going to go for it.

    So my cry for help is two-fold. Firstly, it's a case of if anyone knows any reason why me and this bike should not be joined in holy cycle-mony, let them speak now of forever hold their peace. Secondly, when I check the bike out in the flesh on Thursday (I'm still in Portugal until then), what should I be looking for.

    Any other advice would be most gratefully received... The level of jargon surrounding bikes is befuddling even me, a career scientist!

    It is, to be honest, a very cheap bike and it is not worth the full price by some way, but at the discounted price...well, they don't come cheaper.

    I'd give you four pieces of advice. Take great care to keep it clean and lubed, especially after a wet ride. If you break a spoke, which you will, get the whole wheel retensioned rather than just spoke replaced. Don't bother upgrading it

    Lastly, if you can save up another £250 and get a Tiagra equipped alloy winter bike from Ribble instead.  Worlds apart. Will last longer, ride better, and be easier to maintain.
  • ReplyReply
  • "You can't handle the truth"

    Colonel Nathan R Jessup

    Capt_Cavman

    • Road Captain
    • Country: jp
    • Posts: 1917
    • Liked: 1285
    Re: A confession - and a cry for help
    « Reply #3 on: July 23, 2013, 23:57 »
    going up long, steep hills might be a bit of an issue but apart from that, it looks fine for £250.
  • ReplyReply

  • Dim

    • Grand Tour Winner
    • *
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 8403
    • Liked: 3370
      • Velorooms
    • Awards: Race Preview of 2014Best Post 2012
    Re: A confession - and a cry for help
    « Reply #4 on: July 24, 2013, 00:45 »
    Its not going to be great, BUT, all the components are well known brands, theres no Joe Bloggs brakes, or Shikato Groupset so you know you are getting solid components, and as a first bike its perfectly adequate.

    Get out on a bike, ride a few miles, see if you enjoy doing it, push the distances further, and if you then decide further down the road its a good investment, then make that investment then.

    Certainly for a starting bike its a decent enough spec, as Joachim says, for £599 its a pile of junk and I would strongly advise against it, for £250 its really as cheap as you are going to get without resorting to unbranded components. It will certainly give you a couple of years of good riding and you can decide then if you want to upgrade to something a bit better.

    I raced, in 1989 on a £129 Peugot, and had a couple of top tens in tt's ;)

    (the other advantage of starting out on a lower quality bike, is if you do decide to upgrade further down the line, its basically like doping, you get a weight reduction, and all sorts. :D)
  • ReplyReply

  • Dim

    • Grand Tour Winner
    • *
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 8403
    • Liked: 3370
      • Velorooms
    • Awards: Race Preview of 2014Best Post 2012
    Re: A confession - and a cry for help
    « Reply #5 on: July 24, 2013, 00:47 »
    One thing I would say, is how far will your budget go. You will see a huge improvement in just general comfort from gloves, shorts, and possibly pedals/shoes. So bear that in mind.
  • ReplyReply

  • cj2002

    • Classics Winner
    • *
    • Country: pt
    • Posts: 2893
    • Liked: 3257
    • Honorary President
    • Awards: Best avatar 2012
    Re: A confession - and a cry for help
    « Reply #6 on: July 24, 2013, 10:19 »
    Thanks for all your advice. I had been looking at the B'Twin Triban 3, which head carbon forks and all brand components. Then they discontinued that model, scrapped the carbon painted the frame white, put on unknown components and charged the same price! It's just convenient that I live 2km from a Halfords.

    I agree with you, Joachim. I wouldn't spend more than they're asking for this. £600 would get me a Specialized Allez with change. But the use of Shimano parts impresses me. Capt., the reviews I read said the same as you - but I'm not likely to tackle many hills straight away (not big ones, anyway), and I can always stick a new chainring on if I start getting adventurous, right?

    Dim, I have separate money put aside for clothes - I was trying on some Nalini stuff in Decathlon in Lisbon yesterday. Are they known for being very tight? Because in no way am I a 2XL in any dimension!

    I'm not interested in speed, per se, I want to be able to cover distance in comfort. My ultimate goal is to be able to cycle to work and avoid the 3 trains I need every morning. It's 27km each way, which I can't manage at the moment and so can't justify investment in a cycle-to-work scheme. When I do, that will be £800-1000 I can play with!
  • ReplyReply

  • Capt_Cavman

    • Road Captain
    • Country: jp
    • Posts: 1917
    • Liked: 1285
    Re: A confession - and a cry for help
    « Reply #7 on: July 24, 2013, 10:41 »
    ... Capt., the reviews I read said the same as you - but I'm not likely to tackle many hills straight away (not big ones, anyway), and I can always stick a new chainring on if I start getting adventurous, right?

    ...
    You'd need new cranks too. :niceday
  • ReplyReply

  • cj2002

    • Classics Winner
    • *
    • Country: pt
    • Posts: 2893
    • Liked: 3257
    • Honorary President
    • Awards: Best avatar 2012
    Re: A confession - and a cry for help
    « Reply #8 on: July 24, 2013, 11:07 »
    You'd need new cranks too. :niceday

    Well let me get used to the flat first... I know where to come when I need more technical help ;P
  • ReplyReply

  • Anthony Moan

    • Ahab the Arab
    • Road Captain
    • Country: cv
    • Posts: 2046
    • Liked: 904
    Re: A confession - and a cry for help
    « Reply #9 on: July 25, 2013, 21:45 »
    I had the same Carrera Nitro http://www.carrera-podium.it/en/bike-catalogue, or it is just another brand? Mine was Italian (Chinese) made. :D
  • ReplyReply
  • Reverend Fred Saves!!

    Dim

    • Grand Tour Winner
    • *
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 8403
    • Liked: 3370
      • Velorooms
    • Awards: Race Preview of 2014Best Post 2012
    Re: A confession - and a cry for help
    « Reply #10 on: July 25, 2013, 21:51 »
    I buy all my clothing from Tenn http://www.tenn-outdoors.co.uk
    Cheap and cheerful, not nalini quality or top level, but they do for the more recreational cyclist.
  • ReplyReply

  • Blackbandit222

    • National Champion
    • Country: us
    • Posts: 896
    • Liked: 225
    Re: A confession - and a cry for help
    « Reply #11 on: July 26, 2013, 00:26 »
    This bike is not upgrade or race worthy.  I would save my money for the Specialized Allez.
    I like to look good but I'm to cheap to buy the latest gear.  I have a 2010 C'dale CAAD 9 w/ 9sp Ultegra & wheels are OEM off a '03 Giant TCR (n RS-10's).

    My sweet spot would be 550 to 800 pounds.

    I'd want:
    Integrated Headset (ideally 1.5)
    Carbon fork
    Tiagra or 105 mix/ FSA Omega or Gossamer crank
    NOT a square tapered Bottom Bracket

    Craigslist or Ebay is always an option...just don't get killed w/ shipping.
  • ReplyReply
  • « Last Edit: July 26, 2013, 00:39 by Blackbandit222 »
    Sagan supporter.

    L'arri

    • Is on Dr Search's Green and Grey Diet
    • Grand Tour Winner
    • *
    • Country: be
    • Posts: 8066
    • Liked: 6777
    • Dopeology.org @DopeologyDotOrg @L_arriviste
      • Dopeology.org
    • Awards: Post of the year 2015Best Opening Post 2012
    Re: A confession - and a cry for help
    « Reply #12 on: July 26, 2013, 13:45 »
    It is certainly worth considering second-hand options. A trip to Halfords may only be 2km and you wouldn't have to wait, but your new bike will be expected to do a few more kms than that.

    I guess what I find annoying about low-end stuff is how it tends to wear out or screw up quite quickly and, since I'm mechanically inept, how often I'd have to go down the LBS for a tune-up.

    That said, the example is very cheap and if you're not going to be hammering it seriously, it could certainly be worth the sale price at least. The wheels look like they could be pretty ropey but most other stuff is branded.
  • ReplyReply
  • Cycling is a Europe thing only and I only watch from Omloop on cause I am cool and sh*t
    RIP Craig1985 / Craig Walsh
    RIP KeithJamesMc / Keith McMahon / Larry Sarni

    Armchair Cyclist

    • Classics Winner
    • *
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 2645
    • Liked: 2948
    • Awards: 2019 Spring Classics Prediction Champ2018 Tour de France CQ game winner
    Re: A confession - and a cry for help
    « Reply #13 on: July 26, 2013, 22:01 »
    Likewise, and in keeping with my username, I haven't had a proper bike for many years: I used running as my main exercise for many years, and the bikes of my youth were left in garages of houses long since moved out of.

    I have a bike shaped object: a Halfords Apollo hybrid that I use for occasional yomps through woodland paths with the family, but have also tried to use for a local one hour road circuit.  Part of me reasons that the bike is so heavy, inefficient and has such high rolling resistance that as a means of exercise, it can't be beaten.  I will be burning many more calories dragging this beast around a one hour loop than I might on half a day's trip on a more road-worthy machine.

    But I have overcome this warped, spendthrift logic to bring myself to the threshold of buying a 'proper bike'.  Unless the guy on gumtree gets back to me soon, I have a Specialised Allez lined up through a local bike shop: 18 months old and serviced pre-purchase for £325.
  • ReplyReply

  • LukasCPH

    • World Champion
    • *
    • Country: de
    • Posts: 11643
    • Liked: 7529
      • lukascph.media
    • Awards: Staff of the year 2016Staff of the year 2015Velorooms Tour de France BINGO champion 2014National Championships Predictions Game Winner 2014Velorooms Monday Quiz ChampionPoster of the Year 2013
    Re: A confession - and a cry for help
    « Reply #14 on: July 26, 2013, 22:53 »
    I started out on the Allez. It's a decent bike to start on, does what is expected of it.
    Can't say anything negative about it - but that's partly due to the fact that I exchanged it for another bike after 3 months. :D
  • ReplyReply
  • Cyclingnews Women's WorldTour Correspondent
    2017 0711|CYCLING PR Manager; 2016 Stölting Content Editor
    Views presented are my own. RIP Keith & Sean

     

    Recent Posts



    Top
    Back to top