collapse


L'arri

  • Is on Dr Search's Green and Grey Diet
  • Grand Tour Winner
  • *
  • Country: be
  • Posts: 7996
  • Liked: 6644
  • Dopeology.org @DopeologyDotOrg @L_arriviste
    • Dopeology.org
  • Awards: Post of the year 2015Best Opening Post 2012
Re: Cycling Books
« Reply #120 on: September 12, 2013, 09:57 »
plus they lied about darkside issues

Charley not sure he did to be honest

Yates is not getting me to read his book

keeper of the Omerta can flip right off worse than Graham Watson , muppet

When you write your autobiography, JSG, be sure to employ a copy editor. :hug :lol
  • ReplyReply
  • Cycling is a Europe thing only and I only watch from Omloop on cause I am cool and sh*t
    RIP Craig1985 / Craig Walsh
    RIP KeithJamesMc / Keith McMahon / Larry Sarni

    just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #121 on: September 12, 2013, 10:05 »
    you will be 1st on my list to contact  :P
  • ReplyReply
  • Of course, if this turns out someday to be the industry standard integrated handlebar-computer-braking solution then I'll eat my kevlar-reinforced aerodynamic hat.

    Larri Nov 12, 2014

    Joachim

    • National Champion
    • Country: be
    • Posts: 894
    • Liked: 290
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #122 on: September 12, 2013, 19:05 »
    Cycling bios..... most are terrible...Cav's, Hoy's, Wiggin's first one. Wiggins post tour win bio was a little better, David Miller's was a great read and I put that down to him being considerably brighter and articulate than your average pro. Hamilton's was amazing for pure excess.

    Lance's.....the one he'll never write. The one where he tells the complete truth, not only about everyone involved in his doping, but also about him as a person.

    That is the one I want to read.
  • ReplyReply
  • "You can't handle the truth"

    Colonel Nathan R Jessup

    Caruut

    • 2nd Year Pro
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 375
    • Liked: 502
      • Sporcle quizzes on cycling.
    • Awards: Post of 2014
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #123 on: September 21, 2013, 00:45 »
    I haven't read that many, only:

    Breaking the Chain by Voet
    We Were Young and Carefree by Fignon
    The Death of Marco Pantani by Rendell

    Very interested in the Bahamontes one - how is it as a book?

    I loved the Fignon book because his emotion comes across so vividly in it, and he seems to love cycling in the same way that I do, and I guess many here do too. When I try to explain my passion for bikes to someone who doesn't really ride at all, my mind often thinks to the way Fignon wrote about cycling, especially earlier on in the book.

    It's not always perfectly written but I found myself sucked into his mood swings. When he was happy, I was happy. When he was angry at LeMond, I was angry at LeMond. When he... you get the picture. I found it strangely gripping, and a fun read.

    The book strikes me as an honest one. Perhaps not truthful, but certainly honest.
  • ReplyReply

  • Jamsque

    • Road Captain
    • Country: scotland
    • Posts: 2326
    • Liked: 858
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #124 on: September 23, 2013, 10:17 »
    I just finished "The Tour de France ... to the bitter end" which is a collection of Guardain articles about Le Tour starting almost as early as the Tour itself and going up to the first half of 2012.

    http://amzn.to/1facsY0

    A good read and a really fascinating look at how British attitudes to the Tour evolved over a century. It's also very interesting to see that people were complaining about the Tour becoming too commercial, about strong teams dominating the race, about team tactics suffocating stages, about dope, and all the rest, as far back as the 1920s if not earlier.
  • ReplyReply

  • just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #125 on: September 23, 2013, 10:34 »
    I haven't read that many, only:

    Breaking the Chain by Voet
    We Were Young and Carefree by Fignon
    The Death of Marco Pantani by Rendell

    Very interested in the Bahamontes one - how is it as a book?

    I loved the Fignon book because his emotion comes across so vividly in it, and he seems to love cycling in the same way that I do, and I guess many here do too. When I try to explain my passion for bikes to someone who doesn't really ride at all, my mind often thinks to the way Fignon wrote about cycling, especially earlier on in the book.

    It's not always perfectly written but I found myself sucked into his mood swings. When he was happy, I was happy. When he was angry at LeMond, I was angry at LeMond. When he... you get the picture. I found it strangely gripping, and a fun read.

    The book strikes me as an honest one. Perhaps not truthful, but certainly honest.

    interesting in parts , you also want to punch the rider  Bahamontes in the head to get him to wake up and see how good he is and how he could win more. I must admit I have struggled with the book , and I read fast normally
  • ReplyReply

  • L'arri

    • Is on Dr Search's Green and Grey Diet
    • Grand Tour Winner
    • *
    • Country: be
    • Posts: 7996
    • Liked: 6644
    • Dopeology.org @DopeologyDotOrg @L_arriviste
      • Dopeology.org
    • Awards: Post of the year 2015Best Opening Post 2012
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #126 on: September 23, 2013, 11:37 »
    I finished Tyler's book at the weekend. I enjoyed it on the whole though I think I discussed my distaste for the dodgy-grammar-dressed-up-as-authenticity elsewhere already.
  • ReplyReply

  • KeithJamesMc

    • Road Captain
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 1696
    • Liked: 1396
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #127 on: September 25, 2013, 09:10 »


    Well, I said that I wasn’t going to read it, but I couldn’t help myself. It was in the “Kindle Owners Lending Library” and therefore I could read it for "free" (or more accurately as part of the Amazon Prime Bundle).
    Basically a recap and journey through Sean Kelly cycling career – nothing substantial about either his personal or “medical” history
    •   Sympathetic Bit – after holding the yellow jersey for just one day in his illustrious career, it was stolen from his car.
    •   Disgusting Bit – He sold (or more accurately his manager De Gribaldy) the 1986 Tour of Lombardy to Baronchelli
    •   Yucky Bit – The description of his cyst in the Vuelta in 1987 where he pulled out in the lead
    •   Poisonous Bit – His description of the Intralipid affair whilst he was at PDM in 1991. And more generally the politics of riding in a Dutch team.
    •   Nice Bit – I’ve come away liking Kelly more than I did before. He seems a “actions speak louder than words” type of guy. He comes across as genuine and appreciative of the people who helped his career. The way he handled the competition with Roche was also good.
    •   Annoying Bit – Poor formatting, No Pictures, No index, No Table of Contents. Basically his publisher doesn't care about the electronic version.
    •   Conclusion – nice way to spend a couple of nights, but I don’t think worth the £8 (which I didn’t pay) especially when far better books are available such as the Wegelius tomb.
  • ReplyReply

  • Vespertine

    • Domestic Rider
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 75
    • Liked: 86
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #128 on: October 10, 2013, 14:06 »
    The Roche one was so poor that I didn't bother buying the Sean Kelly one as I expected more of the same. I also bought the Wiggins one to read on a transatlantic flight and wished I'd gone to sleep instead.


    The Roche one was the first ever cycling book that I gave up on, I don't like doing it to any book and thought I would never do it with a cycling book, but honestly it was like wading through mud in an inflatable sumo suit.
  • ReplyReply

  • KeithJamesMc

    • Road Captain
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 1696
    • Liked: 1396
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #129 on: October 17, 2013, 21:06 »
    Project Rainbow – Rod Ellingworth (ghostwritten)




    I quite enjoyed that. Although the title is a bit misleading.

    The book is really a reflection of his time as a Team GB coach. It skirts over his youth and riding days.

    It skips merrily onto the creation of Academy Programme which was basically Ellingworth’s idea and covers some of the good and not so good ideas. But as a British Cycling motto – it is the process not the result that counts. In other words if you get the process right, you’ll eventually win. A couple of nice stories in there, especially the one where Ellingworth jokingly said they would have to take out an Aussie for Cav to win a U-23 track title and Geraint Thomas volunteered.

    It runs onto to the creation of Sky where Ellingworth played a big role and again covers a lot of mistakes they made and in parallel the adapting he had to make dealing with pro’s rather than amateurs. A few stories there as well, classic was the riders adapting to a totally different environment than at other teams.
    The weird thing here was that Ellingworth was also acting as Cav’s personal coach / mentor whilst he was on HTC.

    The description of the intimate planning and team building for years beforehand that went into winning the World Championships. Funny points here: Wiggins committed but never turned up to anything; Froome committed but they forgot to tell him to feed / drink and he was in an awful state at the end of his shift.

    Ellingworth comes across as not as a genius, but someone who is prepared to work hard, try new things, make mistakes, learn from them and move on. All in all, a very likeable chappie.

    I come away from it thinking a few things:
    1)   Sky Classics Disasters – it appears to me that they won’t give up and eventually will find the winning formula. I guess currently the “only Plan A” winning approach for Cav is holding them back.
    2)   Ellingworth is 100% anti-doping from running education programme for the young riders, to telling Cav if he ever does take anything let him know so he can disassociate him to saying Vino winning the Olympic’s was a terrible blow to the sport to hinting that Millar shouldn’t have ridden for GB but it was not his decision.
    3)   How important Steve Peters was – he basically served as a mentor for Ellingworth and I guess a lot of others.
    4)   How important Sean Yates was – he was basically the only one with a clue of elite level road racing.
    5)   How important Kerrison was/is – he was basically the catalyst that turned Team Sky around
    6)   How Max Sciandri ruined the academy (but Ellingworth too nice to point out, just hints)
    7)   How Julich / Froome / Porte were left to their own devices. Hmmm…
  • ReplyReply
  • « Last Edit: October 17, 2013, 21:20 by KeithJamesMc »

    just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #130 on: October 30, 2013, 13:04 »
    Racing through the dark - David Millar



    this is a book that has had mixed responses. The book in total is the story of David's career and i found it very interesting as an autobiography in itself. David has had an interesting life and has some good stories to tell. Obviously the main focus of the book (and even through the early years you feel like he is framing the main events) is the doping. For some Millar did not go far enough in not naming others that doped and others that were involved but he does go into details of how he started doping, how the race and other riders accepted and encouraged it, the process of doping itself, the impacts and the feeling of being caught. For those that do not know a lot about doping in cycling it is an eye opener. I enjoyed it as a book and it was very informative, but as a cycling fan it was also very depressing. The way the book is written you do get drawn in and you do become emotionally involved.

    May not be one for those that know doping and the history and the bigger cynics that may become frustrated with the lack of names and the attempts to justify basically what is cheating. for everyone else would recommend it

    I did not know it was public knowledge - did not really look either tbh

  • ReplyReply

  • just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012

    LukasCPH

    • World Champion
    • *
    • Country: de
    • Posts: 11057
    • Liked: 6924
      • lukascph.media
    • Awards: Staff of the year 2016Staff of the year 2015Velorooms Tour de France BINGO champion 2014National Championships Predictions Game Winner 2014Velorooms Monday Quiz ChampionPoster of the Year 2013
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #132 on: November 09, 2013, 08:35 »
    And another review, also in Danish:
    http://feltet.dk/nyheder/anmeldelse_gul_feber/
  • ReplyReply
  • Cyclingnews Women's WorldTour Correspondent
    2017 0711|CYCLING PR Manager; 2016 Stölting Content Editor
    Views presented are my own. RIP Keith & Sean

    Joachim

    • National Champion
    • Country: be
    • Posts: 894
    • Liked: 290
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #133 on: November 09, 2013, 09:56 »
    Not read it, but to be taken with a massive pinch of salt, I expect.

    The guy is a worm.
  • ReplyReply

  • esafosfina

    • Neo Pro
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 287
    • Liked: 322
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #134 on: November 09, 2013, 22:39 »
    I'm not given to jumping to conclusions, but I happen to feel Joachim's correct: the guy's a flipwit, a liar, and a worm...
  • ReplyReply
  • "Sturgess, don't you dare get off that bike" - Sean Kelly, Nokere, 1989.

    just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #135 on: November 10, 2013, 06:31 »
    I'm not given to jumping to conclusions, but I happen to feel Joachim's correct: the guy's a flipwit, a liar, and a worm...

    2 out of 3 not bad for some of rest of them as well  ;)
  • ReplyReply

  • search

    • World Champion
    • *
    • Country: de
    • Posts: 10806
    • Liked: 11278
    • Awards: Member of the year 2016Post of the year 2016KeithJamesMC 2016Member of the year 20152012 CQ Ranking Tour GameAvatar of the Year 2013
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #136 on: November 10, 2013, 09:22 »
    would be the first guy then not telling the truth in his doping book, wouldn't he?

    haven't read the book nor followed the discussion too closely, but from the short parts I read and from his interviews over the last year I'd say he is totally credible.
  • ReplyReply
  • "If this is cycling, I am a banana"

    Joachim

    • National Champion
    • Country: be
    • Posts: 894
    • Liked: 290
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #137 on: November 10, 2013, 21:16 »
    Well, he's already made broad accusations and then retracted them.

    For sure some of it will be true, though.
  • ReplyReply

  • KeithJamesMc

    • Road Captain
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 1696
    • Liked: 1396
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #138 on: November 19, 2013, 20:05 »
    Ha! Admittedly it was a bit strange reading about oneself... Ed interviewed me over the phone whilst I was in Aus last year, but he'd obviously done his homework and research and there was plenty in there that brought back some memories... If I'm utterly honest, it's quite cathartic, but had you asked the same of me 12 years ago I would have run a mile not to have been interviewed! In the book I'm portrayed as 'The Third Man'... quite a compliment when being compared/contrasted to Obree and Boardman...
    I've just finished "The Race against Time" and really, really enjoyed it.

    The book is advertised as Obree v Boardman, but is much, much more than that:
    - deals very well with the personality side of racing and goes into much more detail than the type casting in the press
    - gives lots of credit to Doug Dailey for his efforts at British Cycling and specifically the decision to hook up Keen/Boardman and dealing with Obree's foibles
    - very good portrait of Peter Keen, the early years. It is really easy to see that Brailsford has only been tinkering at the edge of the blueprint
    - very good detail on the vo2, efficiency, power, weight etc that boardman delivered and paints a decent thesis that both boardman and obree were clean.
    - and best of all, esofosfina's early adventures in british cycling are all documented (including smashing allcomers in his amateur days)

    Highly recommended.

    I've been on a trip with plenty of time for reading, I also read "Land of Second Chances" (not really worth the money) and reread the brilliant Rendell duo about Colombian Cycling and Marco Pantini.
  • ReplyReply
  • « Last Edit: November 19, 2013, 20:26 by KeithJamesMc »

    KeithJamesMc

    • Road Captain
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 1696
    • Liked: 1396
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #139 on: November 21, 2013, 12:17 »
    This has arrived:



    I know what I'm doing tonight  :cool
  • ReplyReply

  • just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #140 on: November 21, 2013, 16:35 »
    This has arrived:



    I know what I'm doing tonight  :cool

    Look forward to hearing how it is, how much fanboy etc
  • ReplyReply

  • KeithJamesMc

    • Road Captain
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 1696
    • Liked: 1396
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #141 on: November 21, 2013, 19:54 »


    Review - Inside Team Sky by David Walsh.

    To be honest before this book was released I was uncertain what to expect and to say that I am pleasantly surprised would be the understatement of the year.
    If people are expecting a fan boy account of his time at Sky or a detailed pseudo-science analysis of climbing performance and blood values then the book is not for you.

    Instead the Walsh approach is a more humanistic approach – Do I believe that these guys are running a doping programme and are they believable?

    He covers all the main question marks over Sky in detail:
    •   How and Why the Kimmage embed offer was withdrawn (Not just a Kimmage attitude problem, but also Sky should had allowed him more access before the big event which they granted to Walsh)
    •   The recruitment of Dr Leinders (basically a mistake freely admitted by all and sundry, but provides background to the mistake without being sympathetic at all)
    •   The JTL passport inquiry (basically his source is non-Sky, his instinct when JTL withdrew from the WC’s was that something was up and he turned to his old UCI and/or Blood Testing contacts he knew from the Lance investigations. The problem is a low blood reading for new red cells from 2012)
    •   Froome’s Bilharzia (basically Sky doctors know everything that is going on, but the experts are in Africa – and yes there are still problems)
    •   Froome’s form improvement (a long story in itself, but basically a rough diamond polished over the years which has always showed potential)
    •   The Froome / Wiggins spat (sounds to me like both are at fault with their stubbornness and pig-headedness, but Brailsford and everyone knows that the team is far weaker without Wiggins. The real interesting bit is that: Wiggins did not pay Froome his share of the 2012 TdF winnings until recently and Brailsford was thinking of penalising 3-months pay if anyone went against team orders)
    •   The 2013 team weakness (Brailsford knew there were problems from Stage 3 and the theme throughout the book is how much weaker the team was compared to 2012)
    •   How Brailsford has learnt his lessons on recruitment and discusses how differently Sky treating the recruitment of Nieve and Earle.
    Walsh basically turns over ever stone that he possibly could do.

    But the strength of the book is the portrait of the back office characters: Brailsford, Ellingworth, Kerriston, Farrell and the various carers and mechanic’s.
    Walsh seems to asked anybody and everybody their attitude to doping and came away believing that they are all anti-doping.

    Although the team has made mistakes in the past, it seems that are more than willing to learn and improve. It also seems that because the press in Italy are giving the team a hard time – this is a huge problem for the sponsors (Sky Italia own 15%) – and the pressure is on from the top not only to run a clean team, but prove they are clean.

    It seems to me that Team Sky aren’t running a team wide doping programme and the only feasible way it could be happening is if someone was flying solo. The setup at races more or less rules out doping during races.

    Thoroughly good read and should put a few minds to rest.

    I don’t believe for a second that Walsh is a fanboy and tried as best he could to undercover something.
  • ReplyReply

  • KeithJamesMc

    • Road Captain
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 1696
    • Liked: 1396
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #142 on: November 26, 2013, 11:18 »
    So the Walsh book doesn't seem to be selling that well
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Best-Sellers-Books-Cycling/zgbs/books/10193881/ref=zg_bs_nav_b_2_55
    Seven Deadly Sins is still outselling it.

    A word of caution - Best Selling Book lists are notorious in their lack of accuracy and Amazon doesn't reveal its algorithm to anyone.

    On the funny side, there is a review (not from me) which takes a few quotes out of context (featuring Florry, Hitch)
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A33P52YMQRA93Z/ref=cm_cr_pr_auth_rev?ie=UTF8&sort_by=MostRecentReview
  • ReplyReply

  • just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #143 on: November 26, 2013, 11:49 »
    So the Walsh book doesn't seem to be selling that well
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Best-Sellers-Books-Cycling/zgbs/books/10193881/ref=zg_bs_nav_b_2_55
    Seven Deadly Sins is still outselling it.

    A word of caution - Best Selling Book lists are notorious in their lack of accuracy and Amazon doesn't reveal its algorithm to anyone.

    On the funny side, there is a review (not from me) which takes a few quotes out of context (featuring Florry, Hitch)
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A33P52YMQRA93Z/ref=cm_cr_pr_auth_rev?ie=UTF8&sort_by=MostRecentReview

    Wow, trolling award goes to exracer.

    :lol
  • ReplyReply

  • Claudio Cappuccino

    • National Champion
    • Country: nl
    • Posts: 922
    • Liked: 788
    • Venga! Venga! Venga!
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #144 on: November 26, 2013, 13:55 »

    Review - Inside Team Sky by David Walsh.

    To be honest before this book was released I was uncertain what to expect and to say that I am pleasantly surprised would be the understatement of the year.
    I agree, it is indeed a must read  :evil:
  • ReplyReply

  • just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #145 on: February 08, 2014, 08:33 »
    http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/a-clean-break-9781472910370/

    Christophe Bassons is a former professional cyclist. His career was a successful one albeit never in the full glare of the media. That all changed when, in 1988, the Festina doping scandal broke and Bassons shot to fame as one of the handful of clean riders in the peloton - and as the only professional who dared to speak openly about the topic.

    Having been seen as a possible champion, his instinctive and stubborn refusal to dope saw him outstripped in physique, stamina and speed by men he’d once equalled or exceeded. His willingness to denounce the doping culture set him against the entire ethos of professional cycling: owners, management and his peers - the likes of Lance Armstrong, Richard Virenque, Christophe Moreau.

    A year later, Bassons’ career was over. Having clashed publicly with other riders - notably with Armstrong during the 1999 Tour de France - and written in French newspapers of his disbelief and disgust, Bassons found himself exhausted and exiled - chewed up and spat out by the sport he loved.

    First published in French in 2000 and now updated following recent revelations from Armstrong, Tyler Hamilton and other high-profile figures, A Clean Break is unmissable reading for all cycling fans. It offers a unique and heartbreaking take on the subject.

  • ReplyReply
  • « Last Edit: February 08, 2014, 09:32 by just some guy »

    just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #146 on: February 23, 2014, 05:33 »


    Quote
    To say I was scared is an understatement; I was petrified. I was wearing the yellow jersey in the Tour de France, I had a vial of EPO in my bag and guys were getting arrested. The price of being caught with this stuff was being taken away in handcuffs. I know there are people who question whether I doped later in my career, but having witnessed the events of that Tour, I knew that to do it again I would have to be insane. When my roommate went for a massage that night I got the EPO out of my bag, smashed it and flushed it down the toilet. Even though the damage was done, it was as if I was flushing away some of my sins.
    I swore to myself that I would never take EPO again. With the yellow jersey hanging over a chair in my room, I put my inner turmoil aside and called my parents at home in Adelaide, where it was the early hours of the morning. Back at the Tour, I went to sleep that night feeling confused, questioning myself, "Did I need to do that? Surely I could have achieved that without EPO, I'm sure I could have."


    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/sport/ride-of-his-life-20140217-32uol.html#ixzz2u7Wz9j1V
  • ReplyReply

  • KeithJamesMc

    • Road Captain
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 1696
    • Liked: 1396
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #147 on: March 05, 2014, 09:57 »
    Cycle of Lies by Juliet Macur




    By far and away the best book that I’ve read so far on the Armstrong and USPS saga. It is both well written and well researched – adding plenty of new insight to the story.

    On Armstrong:
    -   I just can’t for the life of me understand why Armstrong gave Macur the access that she obviously had. She has done her job and investigated and presented her view of a complex situation and relationships from both sides. Armstrong comes out looking really bad, but so do many more of the cast of characters.
    -   it gives the most complete account of his child and teenage hood (It sounds like his mum was as bigger fantasist and as socially challenged as Armstrong himself)
    -   time and time again, Armstrong seems to deliberately destroy positive relationships whether athletic or personal. The seeds of his downfall were laid early on – tossing away relationships, sometimes very nastily and thinking there would be no consequences.
    -   The early Motorola years are presented in quite some detail thanks to the access that Macur had to over 20 hours of JT Neals tapes (which Armstrong said don’t pursue and JT Neal was probably the worst treated out of all the cast of characters associated with Armstrong) and early Motorola soigneur/quack doctor Hendershot.
    -   Ochowitz and Testa are probably really lucky that CIRC starts at 1998, because there seems no doubt whatsoever they were complicit in all the early shenanigans.
    -   Nothing really new in the USPS/Discovery/Comeback years, but that is all covered elsewhere in other books.
    -   The book has Armstrong saying to Creed recently that he has $100m in the bank – this will come back to haunt Armstrong as his pursuers / advisors will want a large slice of the illicit gains.

    On Landis:
    -   Macur has spoken to Allen Lim and the explanation of the relationship he had with Landis is the best (and strangest) part of the book. Landis is obviously keeping a low profile because of the Qui Tam case, but once it is over, he probably will need help for the rest of his life.
    -   Reading between the lines Landis is obviously getting help from Tiger Williams, who is yet another example of the stupidity of Lance in creating unnecessary enemies

    On Tygart:
    -   I think he comes out of the book the best. Especially, not bowing to pressure from Washington (Lance always prefers bullying tactics rather than logic).
    -   The scene when Armstrong unloads after the verdict on Tygart whilst simultaneously wanting a reduction in ban would not be believed if there wasn’t witnesses there.
    -   How USADA got Hincapie to go on record and confess is also a brilliant piece of negotiation and legal pressure. Hincapie is still upset about this.
    -   Also, releasing all the documents onto the internet is a masterstroke that took both the UCI and Armstrong’s legal team by complete surprise. I am not sure whether it is because of Lance insisting they do stupid things or that they do stupid things themselves, but the Armstrong legal team seem incompetent at best and obviously struggle to control Lance.
    -   Vaughters first went to Tygart in 2004!!!

    On the Epilogue:
    -   An amazing conclusion to the book – Armstrong has obviously learnt nothing and will continue to fight (and probably lose) and the way he describes his old friends imply no sort of reconciliation soon.
    -   It will be interesting to see how the remaining Armstrong relationships play out with Bruyneel, Stapleton, Weisel and his lawyer Henmann, because it seems to me that Armstrong destroys (or discards) any friends that he has.
    -   Even more amazingly, Armstrong still seems to think he has done nothing wrong and would do it all again.

    There is much, much more to the book than I have detailed here, but read it for yourself and enjoy…

    The only problem I have with the book is the extensive use of “allegedly” – no doubt insisted upon by lawyers – but it does make you think how much of the text is definitive and how much will be tried to revised by the nutter himself over the years.

    Very good value for money at £6.99 (Kindle edition)
  • ReplyReply

  • search

    • World Champion
    • *
    • Country: de
    • Posts: 10806
    • Liked: 11278
    • Awards: Member of the year 2016Post of the year 2016KeithJamesMC 2016Member of the year 20152012 CQ Ranking Tour GameAvatar of the Year 2013
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #148 on: March 05, 2014, 10:09 »
    thanks, mine hasn't arrived yet, was cheap as well though, 11 euro or something like that with amazon (for the hardcover edition, free shipping)
  • ReplyReply

  • KeithJamesMc

    • Road Captain
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 1696
    • Liked: 1396
    Re: Cycling Books
    « Reply #149 on: March 05, 2014, 11:59 »
    Quote
    -   Also, releasing all the documents onto the internet is a masterstroke that took both the UCI and Armstrong’s legal team by complete surprise. I am not sure whether it is because of Lance insisting they do stupid things or that they do stupid things themselves, but the Armstrong legal team seem incompetent at best and obviously struggle to control Lance.

    Just to clarify this point, because some seem to suggesting the book says there was a deal between the UCI and LA - the book definitely doesn't imply a formal deal but some sort of collusion:

    What the book actually says:
    1. Months before the USADA report was released Armstrong had devised a legal strategy to keep the confessions going public. It seems LA wasn't worried about Landis and Hamilton, but the clean American riders - Zabriskie, Vande Velde and especially Hincapie. The LA legal team knew that they had confessed but not what they said.
    2. The reason for LA accepting the USADA punishment - "I'm fed up of fighting" was because he didn't want the evidence going public. If he appealed, not only was the likelihood that he would lose, but everything would become public and LA couldn't claim a witch-hunt anymore.
    3. LA was banking on the UCI not appealing either.
    4. The UCI was desperate to see the report. Verbiest had been ringing Boch constantly. The suggestion in the book was that the UCI was worried that they would be implicated.
    5. Verbiest was told one hour before the documents went online that they were going public with all the evidence. Verbiest complained and said that USADA couldn't do it. But USADA did it anyway. The reason is that USADA wanted to beat LA in the court of public opinion and present evidence so overwhelming that LA couldn't play the victim anymore.
    6. Verbiest rang LA's lawyers and told them the documents were going online.
    7. LA lawyers started arguing amongst themselves who was to blame.

    So collusion yes, but some grand sort of deal - not proven. Let us see what the CIRC uncovers.
  • ReplyReply

  •  



    Top
    Back to top