collapse


cj2002

  • Classics Winner
  • *
  • Country: pt
  • Posts: 2893
  • Liked: 3256
  • Honorary President
  • Awards: Best avatar 2012
Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
« Reply #90 on: March 25, 2014, 14:06 »
How will they compare the points garnered by the 8 1B teams in their 50 days to the 16 1A teams in their 120 days? Presumably some sort of weighted average? Unless you have teams riding the same races, how do you make a fair comparison of their performance over the season?
  • ReplyReply
  • He shook his head sadly and told me that endemic drug use had compelled him to give up a promising career. "Even one small local race, prize was a salami, and I see doping!" - Tim Moore: Gironimo (Riding the Very Terrible 1914 Tour of Italy)

    just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
    « Reply #91 on: March 25, 2014, 14:12 »
    How will they compare the points garnered by the 8 1B teams in their 50 days to the 16 1A teams in their 120 days? Presumably some sort of weighted average? Unless you have teams riding the same races, how do you make a fair comparison of their performance over the season?
    Only 1A teams score points in the 1A races and only 1 B teams score points in the 1B races .

    if you win 1B then you go upto 1A the next season or maybe even the top 2 and bottom 2 not sure have not read yet, you maybe able to say no thanks to moving up and there will be some complicated darkside related system involved I assume.

    There is a similar thing now only WT teams score points in WT races, pro conti can win the lot, but still not score a single WT point for the official ranking and yes 1A teams will have to ride all 120 1A races days and same for 1B with there 50
  • ReplyReply
  • Of course, if this turns out someday to be the industry standard integrated handlebar-computer-braking solution then I'll eat my kevlar-reinforced aerodynamic hat.

    Larri Nov 12, 2014

    cj2002

    • Classics Winner
    • *
    • Country: pt
    • Posts: 2893
    • Liked: 3256
    • Honorary President
    • Awards: Best avatar 2012
    Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
    « Reply #92 on: March 25, 2014, 14:24 »
    Only 1A teams score points in the 1A races and only 1 B teams score points in the 1B races .

    Oh I see - that makes sense. Sort of.

    Imagine this hypothetical situation...

    Team A - let's call them TinkoSaxoff to protect their identity - have an uncharacteristically poor season in 1A races (injuries, bad luck, Spanish steak), and thus finish bottom of those rankings, but are hugely successful in the 1B and Div.2 races they are invited to. Meanwhile, Team B - let's call them Bofidis - win the most valuable1B race but get almost no other results at any level.

    Under JSG's interpretation of the system, Tinko would be relegated and Bofidis promoted, despite their overall performances making this utterly undeserved for either side.

    That doesn't seem quite fair to me...
  • ReplyReply

  • just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
    « Reply #93 on: March 25, 2014, 14:29 »
    Fair no but that's the way the system works now as well.

    I do not follow football but think champions league and premier league if a team is in the champions league,  they could win that but be delegated from premier league in 1 season right.

    ie do very well when playing in Europe but badly when playing jn England, same idea. Fair no but separate competitions but you use results of 1 the year before to qualify
  • ReplyReply

  • Leadbelly

    • Monument Winner
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 7275
    • Liked: 6651
    • Awards: National Championships Predictions Game Winner 2017National Championships Predictions Game Winner 2016KeithJamesMC award 2016Avatar of the year 2015Velogames Spring Classics 2015National Championships Predictions Game Winner 2014
    Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
    « Reply #94 on: March 25, 2014, 14:34 »
    Oh I see - that makes sense. Sort of.

    Imagine this hypothetical situation...

    Team A - let's call them TinkoSaxoff to protect their identity - have an uncharacteristically poor season in 1A races (injuries, bad luck, Spanish steak), and thus finish bottom of those rankings, but are hugely successful in the 1B and Div.2 races they are invited to. Meanwhile, Team B - let's call them Bofidis - win the most valuable1B race but get almost no other results at any level.

    Under JSG's interpretation of the system, Tinko would be relegated and Bofidis promoted, despite their overall performances making this utterly undeserved for either side.

    That doesn't seem quite fair to me...

    Maybe Bofidis used their noggins and only did badly in the other races though because they were targetting the 1B races specifically and made sure their top men were in shape specifically for those races, since they knew those races were the most important. Once in the top division they'd make sure to target the 1A races instead.

    Maybe Stinkytaxoff only did well in the 1B and Div 2 races because they were against lower level competiton and thus easier to do well in.

    Seems to me to be all about targeting the right races. You just send younger guys/folk coming back from injury etc to races that don't count.
  • ReplyReply

  • just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
    « Reply #95 on: March 25, 2014, 14:39 »
    Yep LB we will see the return of 2 speed racing  :D.

    1A teams for 1A races and 1B teams for 1B races, I wonder if there will be more DNF etc as riders will use races out of their division for training,  probably less so for the 1A races but more so for 1B I think
  • ReplyReply

  • cj2002

    • Classics Winner
    • *
    • Country: pt
    • Posts: 2893
    • Liked: 3256
    • Honorary President
    • Awards: Best avatar 2012
    Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
    « Reply #96 on: March 25, 2014, 14:44 »
    Seems to me to be all about targeting the right races. You just send younger guys/folk coming back from injury etc to races that don't count.

    Yep LB we will see the return of 2 speed racing  :D.

    1A teams for 1A races and 1B teams for 1B races, I wonder if there will be more DNF etc as riders will use races out of their division for training,  probably less so for the 1A races but more so for 1B I think

    Both of which are horrendous scenarios that will do nothing for the long-term health of the sport we all love...
  • ReplyReply

  • Leadbelly

    • Monument Winner
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 7275
    • Liked: 6651
    • Awards: National Championships Predictions Game Winner 2017National Championships Predictions Game Winner 2016KeithJamesMC award 2016Avatar of the year 2015Velogames Spring Classics 2015National Championships Predictions Game Winner 2014
    Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
    « Reply #97 on: March 25, 2014, 14:59 »
    Maybe, but it's not that different from now. Plenty of races now which don't mean anything points wise and have weaker teams, but it's racing - sponsors want you to win, maybe it's a local race to where your team come from and young guys always want to do well.

    Maybe it would only be in 1B races were we would see a cagier style of racing from the 1B teams - only 50 days that count so every day's racing would have to count.
  • ReplyReply

  • Dim

    • Grand Tour Winner
    • *
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 8403
    • Liked: 3365
      • Velorooms
    • Awards: Race Preview of 2014Best Post 2012
    Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
    « Reply #98 on: March 25, 2014, 15:29 »
    It also doesnt appear to mention the fact in the new pdf that the WT teams will be allowed a development roster of 8-9 riders that can ride Euro tour races and similar.

    unless i missed that.
  • ReplyReply

  • DB-Coop

    • Classics Winner
    • *
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 2662
    • Liked: 1751
    • Awards: KeithJamesMC Memorial award for Extremely Outstanding Content 2014Avatar of 2014Velorooms Vuelta Velogames Winner 2014
    Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
    « Reply #99 on: March 25, 2014, 21:04 »
    Maybe, but it's not that different from now. Plenty of races now which don't mean anything points wise and have weaker teams, but it's racing - sponsors want you to win, maybe it's a local race to where your team come from and young guys always want to do well.

    Maybe it would only be in 1B races were we would see a cagier style of racing from the 1B teams - only 50 days that count so every day's racing would have to count.

    The 1B races would be silly, if it is the races that JSG presented earlier in his schedule. You would have 1A teams getting beaten badly because they would only race for start money at half the races. And at many others they would not show up. Who would ride Tour of Poland in this system from the 1A a few teams maybe but not a lot, if I had to bet on it I would say Tinkoff, that is it.

    This idea to a calendar is horrible, the calendar showcase that JSG presented earlier is a calender where at least 1/3 of the race days in 1A and 1B are things not worth watching
  • ReplyReply

  • KeithJamesMc

    • Road Captain
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 1696
    • Liked: 1396
    Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
    « Reply #100 on: March 25, 2014, 21:33 »
    It also doesnt appear to mention the fact in the new pdf that the WT teams will be allowed a development roster of 8-9 riders that can ride Euro tour races and similar.

    unless i missed that.

    you did.

    page 2 - right hand column - 8 to 10 riders.
  • ReplyReply

  • Flo

    • #1 Alberto Contador fangirl
    • Grand Tour Winner
    • *
    • Country: nl
    • Posts: 8452
    • Liked: 4205
    • Awards: National Championships Predictions Game Winner 2018KeithJamesMC award 2016Velorooms Trivia Monday Quiz Champion 2015/2016Dish of the Year 2015Member of the year 2015Fan of the year 20152015 Giro Quiz League - 3rd placeNational Championships Predictions Game Winner 2014Fan of the year 2013Best fanboy/girl 2012
    Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
    « Reply #101 on: March 25, 2014, 22:38 »
    I am worried about the maximum of 22 riders, imagine how many riders will lose their jobs :(
  • ReplyReply
  • RIP Keith
    RIP krebs

    DB-Coop

    • Classics Winner
    • *
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 2662
    • Liked: 1751
    • Awards: KeithJamesMC Memorial award for Extremely Outstanding Content 2014Avatar of 2014Velorooms Vuelta Velogames Winner 2014
    Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
    « Reply #102 on: March 26, 2014, 07:16 »
    I am worried about the maximum of 22 riders, imagine how many riders will lose their jobs :(

    True, they will likely just be split down though. But I really see the concern there. IMO all the elite riders ought to be in the WT, I mean nobody would want some of the best players in Football to play for some 2nd division team. 16x22=352. I believe that with the different parcours over the year there is more elite riders than that. Surely there is enough stage racers for 16 teams to have 3 or 4 each. There is more than enough sprinters that each team could have 3 if they wanted. There is cobble specialist that take up another 3 or 4 spots. Punchers would then take up about 4 more spots. TT specialist could take up the next 2 spots. Probably 4 or 5 spots alone on elite climbers. And then you have the flat speed riders where every team could likely also have 5 and all be a high quality. Clearly that will be over 352. 
  • ReplyReply

  • Arb

    • Road Captain
    • Country: an
    • Posts: 2332
    • Liked: 542
    Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
    « Reply #103 on: March 26, 2014, 08:11 »
    I think it could work for 8 men teams in Division 1 races, and 6 men teams below that.

    A 1A team will have 120 1A races days and say 30 out of the 50 1B days.

    (120+30) x 8 = 1200 rider days to be filled

    Don't know how many days the 22 riders (and maybe there'll be extra room for neo-pros like now) will race, but maybe in the 70-80 range.

    22 x 70 = 1540 rider days
    22 x 80 = 1760 rider days

    1540 - 1200 = 340 free days
    1760 - 1200 = 560 free days

    So they'll have between 340-560 rider days to fill in the lower division races (6 man teams).

    340/6 = ~57
    560/6 = ~93

    So that gives 120 1A race days, 30 1B races days and anywhere between 57 and 93 race days in the lower division.
     


    If you have 8 per GT it means an average of 1.09 GTs/rider, if it stayed at 9 it would be 1.23 At the moment it's 0.9. There are plenty of riders who do zero as they are young/crap. Yes the crap ones will be cut but some are pure classics riders and the top teams aren't going to not sign the best u23s so either they are thrown in the deep end or others who don't want to do 2-3 GTs are going to end up starting in them.

    My point behind all this is that there is this ludicrous idea lurking in the background of the best riders showing up to the best races and everyone making more money. If teams become more limited in how they can use race days the best (in reality the next-best as you're not going to compromise the schedules of your leaders) riders on a team may find themselves in places they really don't want to be which would be worse for everyone.

    I don't actually know why there is a squad limit to begin with, bring back the days of the Mapei 50 man squad for all I care. There are enough trade-offs inherent to stop any unacceptable outcomes.
  • ReplyReply

  • just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
    « Reply #104 on: March 26, 2014, 09:04 »
    Yep smaller teams will not mean more racing days for the stars we will see more of what is going on a Dwars today with 5 , 6 , man teams

    unless it is in the division of the team they will be there is full force
  • ReplyReply

  • just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
    « Reply #105 on: March 27, 2014, 17:07 »
    http://www.uci.ch/Modules/ENews/ENewsDetails2011.asp?id=OTg3MQ
    Quote
    27.03.2014

     The Professional Cycling Council (PCC) met in Montreux (Switzerland) on March 26th and 27th.   It was the first time that the PCC, presided by David Lappartient, has met since it was newly composed.

    In opening, UCI President Brian Cookson and Mr Lappartient reminded members of the reform’s objectives: to reinforce the credibility, clarity, and ethics of professional road cycling.

    The PCC members decided that the new terms of reference that the UCI ProTeams and organisers of UCI WorldTour events will eventually have to adhere to, shall go through a test phase before being adopted permanently. This is an important step in the reform of professional road cycling.

    The teams’ terms of reference contain a certain number of rules that aim to change the culture of professional cycling in order to guarantee it is ethical. In particular, it is a question of obligations concerning the organisation of teams (composition and distribution of tasks), the preparation of riders (workload and care provided) as well as the employment and the certification of team personnel.

    As for the terms of reference for the organisers, it covers the following areas: logistics, accommodation, organisation standards, security, television production and broadcast, public attendance and budget. It is the first time that such a document exists for organisers.

    From the end of the 2016 season, the teams will be evaluated according to the new terms of reference in view of their registration for 2017. The terms of reference will be the object of a test phase during the two years beforehand: by some 10 voluntary UCI ProTeams at the end of 2014 in the perspective of registration for 2015, and by all UCI ProTeams at the end of 2015 for registration in 2016. These two seasons of experience will enable the final content of the terms of reference to be established. The teams will be able to use this period to adapt to the new rules before they become an obligation.

    The organisers will have to respect their terms of reference from the end of the 2016 season with a view to registration for 2017. All of them will have tested the terms of reference the year before, before they become an obligation.

    Moreover, the PCC imposed a moratorium on the subject of new UCI WorldTour events. Event organisers wishing their race to join this series will have to wait until 2017 to have the possibility to join the first division.

    The PCC also validated a selection process for UCI ProTeams according to sporting criteria for the next two years: In 2015, the 16 best teams of the 2014 UCI WorldTour ranking will be given UCI ProTeam status (providing that they satisfy other necessary criteria). The two remaining places will be awarded to the two teams (UCI ProTeams, UCI Professional Continental Teams or new teams) with the highest accumulated points total from their best five riders on the UCI WorldTour individual ranking. The same system will be used in 2016.

    From 2015, the name UCI ProTeam will be replaced by UCI WorldTeam while awaiting a permanent name from 2017.

    Finally, the PCC affirmed its agreement with the philosophy and objectives of the MPCC (Mouvement Pour un Cyclisme Crédible), presided over by Roger Legeay and which comprises 11 UCI ProTeams and 16 UCI Professional Continental Teams determined to fight against doping. There will be reinforced consultation with the MPCC concerning regulations.
  • ReplyReply

  • DB-Coop

    • Classics Winner
    • *
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 2662
    • Liked: 1751
    • Awards: KeithJamesMC Memorial award for Extremely Outstanding Content 2014Avatar of 2014Velorooms Vuelta Velogames Winner 2014
    Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
    « Reply #106 on: March 30, 2014, 11:13 »
    Yep smaller teams will not mean more racing days for the stars we will see more of what is going on a Dwars today with 5 , 6 , man teams

    unless it is in the division of the team they will be there is full force

    Even if forced to add days to a riders schedule it will be the doms that get the extra work load, they won't reduce Nibali's chances at the Tour by riding more races with him, however they may be forced to have some doms ride crazy 150-160 race days to make sure the ones they really need are fresh.
  • ReplyReply

  • Echoes

    • Road Captain
    • Country: be
    • Posts: 1325
    • Liked: 1447
    Re: 2018 the road map for cycling
    « Reply #107 on: March 30, 2014, 16:38 »
    22 riders per team is the good news. Thereby you'll have less "co-leadership".

    Also if this Tour of Catalunya can get away from its current awful place in the calendar. That could force some all-rounders to race Milan-Sanremo.


    However as long as we are stuck in the PT paradigm, we won't get out of it. You'll have to remember what was there before !!!

    We do not need this world governing body that is UCI. More freedom for race promoters and for national federations, is the way to go.
  • ReplyReply
  • "Paris-Roubaix is the biggest cycling race in the world, bigger than the Tour de France, bigger than any other bike race" (Sir Bradley Wiggins)

    just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: 2018 - The [UCI] Road Map For Cycling
    « Reply #108 on: April 02, 2014, 08:17 »
    There is some doping talk in this but if we do not discuss that here

    Hein makes some interesting points

    there is the Velonews article - here

    and the full text  - Changing Pro Cycling: The Perspective of Hein Verbruggen
  • ReplyReply

  • just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: 2018 - The [UCI] Road Map For Cycling
    « Reply #109 on: April 02, 2014, 08:28 »
    Going to be a really hard time for cycling unless the ASO plays ball
  • ReplyReply

  • Armchair Cyclist

    • Road Captain
    • *
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 2238
    • Liked: 2400
    • Awards: 2018 Tour de France CQ game winnerGiro Prediction Champ 2017
    Re: UCI Road Map For Cycling
    « Reply #110 on: April 04, 2014, 14:35 »
    For the second division teams, 50 days is a very limited season to prove them selves in.  The balance of these between different styles of racedays will be vital, and the demands of those few races will become the determinants of the make up of squads, rather than the local identity of those teams.  With only 50 point scoring days open to them, none of these races can be ignored as point scoring opportunities for these teams.


    If Caja Rural, for example, harbour ambitions of promotion, their natural and national priorities for this time of the year, Tours of Catalunya and Basque Country (guessing they will be Div 1 Calendar), will be usurped by the points need to get the best results they can out of Samyn and Driedaagse.  But pedalling around the rainy cobbles of Belgium instead of foggy Pyrenean mountain will not stir the hearts of potential bank customers in Spain, and nor will the Flemish names that will have to replace Spanish ones in order to chase such points. 

    Equally, a team like Bretagne Seche Environnement will have nothing to gain from exposure to the market in Italian autumnal races, or the Tour of Poland.

    So teams lose not only local identity, and local riders, but also local sponsorship.  If the sport were awash with major international sponsors, that might not be a problem, but at the level that this applies to most sponsorship is fairly parochial, and squads at least mainly regional. 

    Worst case scenario: races like the Canadian WT races and the Tour of Beijing are dropped onto this calendar because of pressure from Division 1 teams, and then the teams with the more limited budgets get forced to do the races with the worst cost-benefit analysis for their sponsors.

    Who do the UCI expect to be the sponsors of teams at this level?
  • ReplyReply

  • just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: UCI Road Map For Cycling
    « Reply #111 on: June 27, 2014, 15:26 »
    https://twitter.com/inrng/status/482515727237533696

    so it begins max of 8 riders per team, chance for more wild cards, maybe , might not be.

    this will allow the teams or force the teams to have less riders in their A squad.

    Some time in September, October races and teams will finally workout what is going on and say no I think, and jt will be all too late
  • ReplyReply

  • just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: UCI Road Map For Cycling
    « Reply #112 on: June 27, 2014, 15:54 »
    And here is the pdf the info comes from
  • ReplyReply

  • Leadbelly

    • Monument Winner
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 7275
    • Liked: 6651
    • Awards: National Championships Predictions Game Winner 2017National Championships Predictions Game Winner 2016KeithJamesMC award 2016Avatar of the year 2015Velogames Spring Classics 2015National Championships Predictions Game Winner 2014
    Re: UCI Road Map For Cycling
    « Reply #113 on: June 27, 2014, 16:11 »

    Some time in September, October races and teams will finally workout what is going on and say no I think, and jt will be all too late

    There's something wrong with teams going to eight riders (even if it only affect GTs)? or what's the problem?
  • ReplyReply

  • just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: UCI Road Map For Cycling
    « Reply #114 on: June 27, 2014, 16:16 »
    There's something wrong with teams going to eight riders (even if it only affect GTs)? or what's the problem?
    Not really 8 riders for me is ok, but these type of changes are part of a massive change to cycling, that tbh no one seems to know about or really care,  and that's what I was referring to
  • ReplyReply

  • Leadbelly

    • Monument Winner
    • Country: gb
    • Posts: 7275
    • Liked: 6651
    • Awards: National Championships Predictions Game Winner 2017National Championships Predictions Game Winner 2016KeithJamesMC award 2016Avatar of the year 2015Velogames Spring Classics 2015National Championships Predictions Game Winner 2014
    Re: UCI Road Map For Cycling
    « Reply #115 on: June 27, 2014, 16:23 »
    Sounds like there's a question for Oleg there.
  • ReplyReply

  • Flo

    • #1 Alberto Contador fangirl
    • Grand Tour Winner
    • *
    • Country: nl
    • Posts: 8452
    • Liked: 4205
    • Awards: National Championships Predictions Game Winner 2018KeithJamesMC award 2016Velorooms Trivia Monday Quiz Champion 2015/2016Dish of the Year 2015Member of the year 2015Fan of the year 20152015 Giro Quiz League - 3rd placeNational Championships Predictions Game Winner 2014Fan of the year 2013Best fanboy/girl 2012
    Re: UCI Road Map For Cycling
    « Reply #116 on: June 27, 2014, 16:24 »
    I reckon the team size for 1 week stage races will decrease too then, and for one day races, in other words less riders needed = loads of riders without a team.

    Post Merge: June 27, 2014, 16:27
    I don't really see what is wrong with teams of 9 in GTs, also 8 instead of 9 means injuries, illness, and especially riders that drop out will have a bigger impact.
  • ReplyReply

  • just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 31324
    • Liked: 10901
    • Awards: 2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: UCI Road Map For Cycling
    « Reply #117 on: June 27, 2014, 19:09 »
    Sounds like there's a question for Oleg there.

    Good idea
  • ReplyReply

  • DB-Coop

    • Classics Winner
    • *
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 2662
    • Liked: 1751
    • Awards: KeithJamesMC Memorial award for Extremely Outstanding Content 2014Avatar of 2014Velorooms Vuelta Velogames Winner 2014
    Re: UCI Road Map For Cycling
    « Reply #118 on: June 27, 2014, 21:01 »
    I reckon the team size for 1 week stage races will decrease too then, and for one day races, in other words less riders needed = loads of riders without a team.

    Post Merge: June 27, 2014, 16:27
    I don't really see what is wrong with teams of 9 in GTs, also 8 instead of 9 means injuries, illness, and especially riders that drop out will have a bigger impact.

    Agree the 9 for GT is less of a problem than 8 for week long races. Basically 5-6 is ideal to create fun racing I think, but you have to allow some room for injury and much different parcours in a GC, I like 9 there, but 6 would be fine at Romandie imo.
  • ReplyReply

  • DB-Coop

    • Classics Winner
    • *
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 2662
    • Liked: 1751
    • Awards: KeithJamesMC Memorial award for Extremely Outstanding Content 2014Avatar of 2014Velorooms Vuelta Velogames Winner 2014
    Re: UCI Road Map For Cycling
    « Reply #119 on: June 27, 2014, 21:14 »
    Classics would be good with 5 riders, this would force skilled riders to be used early meaning bigger chance of an outside attack winning.
  • ReplyReply

  •  

    Recent Posts



    Top
    Back to top