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Drummer Boy

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Re: Trolling and Abuse
« Reply #30 on: March 23, 2014, 18:44 »
This discussion has reminded me of my very first online experience.

Funny thing, I still remember in the very early '90s when a friend of mine who worked for a defense contractor told me, "We have this thing at work called the 'internet.'"  :D

After reading quite a bit about this new horizon and all the possibilities that it offered, I truly adopted a somewhat naive and overly optimistic view of what was to come. I was intrigued by the idea of chat rooms where like-minded individuals could share their interests and passions in a receptive and encouraging environment. I wanted to believe that when stripped away from the daily antagonism that one might often encounter in real life (people yelling or honking in traffic, rude customers in line at the bank, etc) what might be left would be nothing but positive, supportive sharing amongst like-minded individuals.

I had read about The Well, one of the internet's very first, and most selective, online communities, and was truly inspired by the possibilities. I was very idealistic about this Brave New World.

Fast-forward a couple of years to my own maiden voyage—this probably would've been around 1995 when my roommate at the time just got AOL for his mac. I was exploring one of the AOL chatrooms, I believe the title was simply "Mac vs PC." I was new to computers myself at the time, and asked if there was a way to minimize windows on a Mac they way you could with MS-Windows.

The response I got was, "Macs suck."  :o :lol

And there you have it. Everything I needed to know about online communication was given to me in just two words!  :P
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  • « Last Edit: March 24, 2014, 02:12 by Drummer Boy »

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #31 on: March 24, 2014, 15:52 »
    The response I got was, "Macs suck."  :o :lol

    Some hate it to be fair I find this form of communication fine. Just don't take dumb people comments to heart and try to have a witty response.

    "wush wush - What's that draft? oh yea please close windows cause it freaking blows"


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  • Sizzle

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #32 on: March 27, 2014, 10:51 »
    This discussion has reminded me of my very first online experience.

    Funny thing, I still remember in the very early '90s when a friend of mine who worked for a defense contractor told me, "We have this thing at work called the 'internet.'"  :D

    After reading quite a bit about this new horizon and all the possibilities that it offered, I truly adopted a somewhat naive and overly optimistic view of what was to come. I was intrigued by the idea of chat rooms where like-minded individuals could share their interests and passions in a receptive and encouraging environment. I wanted to believe that when stripped away from the daily antagonism that one might often encounter in real life (people yelling or honking in traffic, rude customers in line at the bank, etc) what might be left would be nothing but positive, supportive sharing amongst like-minded individuals.

    I had read about The Well, one of the internet's very first, and most selective, online communities, and was truly inspired by the possibilities. I was very idealistic about this Brave New World.

    Fast-forward a couple of years to my own maiden voyage—this probably would've been around 1995 when my roommate at the time just got AOL for his mac. I was exploring one of the AOL chatrooms, I believe the title was simply "Mac vs PC." I was new to computers myself at the time, and asked if there was a way to minimize windows on a Mac they way you could with MS-Windows.

    The response I got was, "Macs suck."  :o :lol

    And there you have it. Everything I needed to know about online communication was given to me in just two words!  :P

    Which reminds me of my first venture into the online world. Also mid 1990s, exploring various chat rooms. I would attempt conversation in some room that looked interesting and very quickly would be met with A/S/L? (Age/Sex/Location?) Then, having learnt I am a woman, "Pic pls". When I wouldn't send a photo, any "conversation" quickly died. I had naively thought there might actually be conversation in these chat up rooms.  :D



    Back to the topic -- I have found myself agreeing with much of what has already been said. The anonymity of the web and social media gives rise to behaviours/interactions that wouldn't pass muster in face-to-face interaction. The physical absence of those being interacted with gives a liberating sense of freedom (no need to pay attention to those cues and gestures) which encourages some people to speak more freely or critically.

    I was happy to leave another cycling forum because I found it to be an unnecessarily brutal and aggressive place. I used to think of it as the Wild West or Lord of the Flies. It seemed to me at the time that many people confused their right to "free speech" with the right to insult and bully. It was also a male-dominated environment and I wondered then and again now whether sex/gender makes an important difference in what kind of interaction we feel is appropriate. To put it bluntly, men (in general) seem more comfortable with trading argy bargy and insults.

    I was very touched by Kiwirider's post. In fact, I shed a few tears, and if you are reading this, Kiwirider, I thank you for taking the time to write it.  I too have a long history of mental illness. It manifests differently to that of his girlfriend, but much of the experience he described has echoes in my own experience. For me too, resilience is something that varies greatly from day to day.

    My own view on the plethora of contemporary media is that my primary challenge is to make it work for me. There's a glut of info, news and otherwise -- find what sources and forms work best for me & ignore the rest. There's a whole heap of TV, movies, music .... ditto. And use phones, Facebook, Twitter, online forums etc when they are working for me (time-wise, emotions-wise, interest-wise) and don't let them take over.

    I agree with Drummer Boy that there are ways to put boundaries on these platforms and interactions. I think we all need to learn how to do so, particularly if our media overload or interactions are having a negative impact. It's part of maintaining our emotional/mental health in environments that can be funny, fun, social, interesting but also insensitive, cruel or emotionally challenging.

    I also believe it's worth us staying mindful of the fact there are actual living human beings behind the avatar or pixels. Or, harder to remember, lurking invisibly. They are possibly much less emotionally invested in the interaction than me or you. Or possibly very much more. They might be having a great day or a terrible one. They might have let their guard down and be more affected by something than you or I would expect. It is not your or my responsibility to protect them from harm and we can't, in any case, not knowing what constitutes their harm, not knowing them, in fact. In my view, however, that is not justification for being rude or vindictive or bullying.

    For my part, I'm appreciative of the reminder to take some care and I appreciate the discussion.


    ETA -- The phrase "do unto others" might work as a guide to what's appropriate.  Though, without the non-verbal information of face-to-face conversation, an awful lot can be misinterpreted and taken as offensive, when no offence was intended.


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  • « Last Edit: March 27, 2014, 12:31 by Sizzle »

    Drummer Boy

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #33 on: March 30, 2014, 21:53 »
    My own view on the plethora of contemporary media is that my primary challenge is to make it work for me.
    This brings me to a question I'm constantly asking myself.
    Has it worked...for me?

    It may seem overly cliche, but I'm alwyays reminded of this clip from the movie Contact (esp @0:48).



    When I look back 20 years, before cell phones, daily internet, social networking, the web, etc. I can't say that much in my life is really any better as result of this "progress." Back then, I was making more money, was more productive creatively, was more "networked" (in ways that actually impacted my life), was less distracted, and had more friends. Not to mention, I wasn't straddled with the burden of the expense of "being connected." Take away computer purchases (and upkeep), internet access, and cell phones (purchasing, accessories, monthly fees) and I had better things to spend my money on.

    Sure, I can do a ton of things now that weren't even conceived of back then. But so what? Most of it is cheap entertainment, and very fleeting at best. And now we are expected to be connected and available 24/7, to employers, friends and family. I miss being able to travel and actually get away from all that. I was recently reminiscing about a two month tour I did in Japan, Okinawa and Korea back then. I mailed some postcards but was not receiving anything the entire time. When I came back home, I had only my phone answering machine to fill me in on any essential information that I may have missed.

    Two months. Coming back home actually felt like something due to the complete lack of communication while I was away. Reunions were sweet and there was much to share, including my photo albums of actual pictures. That will never happen again. It's something that a younger generation will likely never know. Two months. No cell phones or computers. God, it was beautiful.
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  • « Last Edit: March 31, 2014, 01:28 by Drummer Boy »

    Sizzle

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    • Vale Craig1985
    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #34 on: April 03, 2014, 04:55 »
    This brings me to a question I'm constantly asking myself.
    Has it worked...for me?

    It may seem overly cliche, but I'm alwyays reminded of this clip from the movie Contact (esp @0:48).



    When I look back 20 years, before cell phones, daily internet, social networking, the web, etc. I can't say that much in my life is really any better as result of this "progress." Back then, I was making more money, was more productive creatively, was more "networked" (in ways that actually impacted my life), was less distracted, and had more friends. Not to mention, I wasn't straddled with the burden of the expense of "being connected." Take away computer purchases (and upkeep), internet access, and cell phones (purchasing, accessories, monthly fees) and I had better things to spend my money on.

    Sure, I can do a ton of things now that weren't even conceived of back then. But so what? Most of it is cheap entertainment, and very fleeting at best. And now we are expected to be connected and available 24/7, to employers, friends and family. I miss being able to travel and actually get away from all that. I was recently reminiscing about a two month tour I did in Japan, Okinawa and Korea back then. I mailed some postcards but was not receiving anything the entire time. When I came back home, I had only my phone answering machine to fill me in on any essential information that I may have missed.

    Two months. Coming back home actually felt like something due to the complete lack of communication while I was away. Reunions were sweet and there was much to share, including my photo albums of actual pictures. That will never happen again. It's something that a younger generation will likely never know. Two months. No cell phones or computers. God, it was beautiful.

    To me one of the fascinating aspects of ageing is this business of living through changes in technology that are so profound as to significantly change the way people live. My great-grandmother lived through the advent of the motor vehicle, electricity, refrigeration, indoor plumbing, sound recordings & players, penicillin, telephone, radio, television and air travel and died about a decade before the internet and mobile phone technology started to become commonplace.

    As I see things it's not a matter of us being "better off" for all this new-fangled web and mobile phone technology. It's just different.

    I do remember a spaciousness of time and place as something that infused life then. I too travelled in the days before the internet and mobile phone technology. I backpacked around Europe, solo, for over three months. I knew no one in the northern hemisphere and sent postcards regularly so that if anything happened to me police would have a point from which to track me. (“The last postcard was sent from Crete.”) International phone calls were prohibitively expensive and as I had no set itinerary it wasn’t possible to receive mail at poste restante. How alone is that? Almost incomprehensible today.

    These days I find it hard to imagine life without being able to use the web to find out information. I cast my mind back, and all I come up with is that we used libraries and, far more commonly, the telephone, spending hours speaking to various people to find a solution or correct information.
     
    In the “olden days” we'd make arrangements to meet at a particular time and place and have to be prepared to hang around for 30 or more minutes, there being no way of advising people if you were stuck in traffic or your train was cancelled. I also remember the frustration of waiting for someone who was running late and cycling through phases of annoyance, anger, worry ("What if they've been in an accident?") back to anger etc.

    It’s fun having a smart phone but, as a woman, it seems like a safety device too. I keep mine on mute most of the time so that I am not “on call” to friends and family at all times. Instant access, be damned.

    Time certainly seems more pressured for most people, although how much of this is due to technology and how much might be due to economic imperatives to be more “productive” and to work longer and harder, I’m not sure.
     
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  • Vespertine

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #35 on: April 03, 2014, 07:41 »
    Yeah I am another genuine nutcase with a deep and long history of mental illness. This thread has not only been really interesting but also seems to me to be either a sign that attitudes to online communication are changing or confirming that this is a pretty safe forum  for me.

    I am a fully grown man with kids etc. I work in an industry that is known for its absolute insensitivity and I get on just fine. I think this is because I am very good at what I do, I know that sounds odd coming from someone like me, but I am and it makes me feel stable, so I can cope very easily with anything at work.

    However I am ridiculously sensitive and insecure online, even though I don't even use my real name.

    It is all because I was brought up by an abusive alcoholic and I just want to be accepted and validated rather than told that me and my opinions are totally worthless... I know what is going on, but that doesn't ensure that I am able to "Just forget it" or "take it with a pinch of salt" or "laugh it off", I just can't, so deep rooted is my insecurity.

    Indeed, for some strange reason it seems to be magnified online as it is almost me bare. I can't use body language or my physical presence ( I am not a massive muscly presence at all, I am cyclist, tall and thin, but I also know that I am not ugly and I dress carefully, so use this as a mask and project a real air of confidence even when I am not) to socially engineer to my satisfaction or comfort, I can only write what I write and hope that someone doesn't take the mickey as it hurts me.

    This simply is what it is, I can't change it really no matter how much I want to. This is me.

    I have left most forums that I have ever joined as I just end up thinking that everyone is "better" than me. Yeah it is that bad.

    Sounds so silly when I type it out, but I know that it is true.

    I am happy to say though that this place seems very very different, it just doesn't seem to go down much if at all.

    You know there is a flip side also to the negative aspects of this condition or mind set and that is if people respond nicely or even "like" what I say, I feel on top of the world and it can totally make my day, it often does.

    I find it interesting that for some reason I feel comfortable sharing this brutal truth for the first time ever.

    I feel better for it. I need a cup of tea.

    Thanks for the thread AG, it is important to me.



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  • Sizzle

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #36 on: April 03, 2014, 11:10 »
    Thanks for sharing that brutal truth, Vespertine. (The more of us, the merrier.  ;))



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  • Vespertine

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #37 on: April 03, 2014, 16:37 »
    To be honest I have been quite proud of myself all day for it. I am not sure why I decided to do it, I think it was the thread and Kiwiriders story which I could just have swapped out me for his partner word for word, road instead of mountain.

    Thank you for your comment and everyone for their likes.

    It did indeed make my day.

    Velorooms therapy. That's twice this week!!
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  • Dim

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #38 on: April 03, 2014, 17:20 »
    Yeah I am another genuine nutcase with a deep and long history of mental illness.

    Ah, dont worry, this forum has several medical confirmed nutcases, myself included. :D
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  • Vespertine

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #39 on: April 03, 2014, 17:31 »
    Yet it remains one of the most civil forums I have ever come across :) I wonder if I search for a forum called "The Black Dog" or something I will find forum Nirvana. Somehow I doubt it :)
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  • DB-Coop

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #40 on: April 03, 2014, 23:11 »
    Yet it remains one of the most civil forums I have ever come across :)

    I think it is a result of the limited size of the forum mainly, it is more like a group of people one would know in real life, than some 5000 member active forum where only very active members knows any significant amount about the rest of the forum.

    I have to say the tine of the forum was the main reason for me joining in the first place, I think I had a question I had to ask regarding cycling so I had to pick a forum, so I picked this one over another one which shall remain nameless based around the fact that the people here seemed pretty well behaved and there were only few moderation, if I saw any, where as the other place(s) I looked at seemed to have either serious problems with members or a fascist moderation squad. I used to think it was the latter, but come to think of it later I may very well have been wrong in that assumption.
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  • AG

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #41 on: April 04, 2014, 00:37 »
    To be honest I have been quite proud of myself all day for it. I am not sure why I decided to do it, I think it was the thread and Kiwiriders story which I could just have swapped out me for his partner word for word, road instead of mountain.

    Thank you for your comment and everyone for their likes.

    It did indeed make my day.

    Velorooms therapy. That's twice this week!!

    you should be proud of yourself Vespertine.  Its scary sharing that much of yourself sometimes.  Even when its anonymous.

    As for the forum - it is a great community.  And the more we put into it, the more we will get out of it.  :D
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  • Sizzle

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #42 on: April 04, 2014, 03:42 »
    you should be proud of yourself Vespertine.  Its scary sharing that much of yourself sometimes.  Even when its anonymous.


    I agree with AG, Vespertine. To be so articulate, so clear, honest and open about such difficult, painful stuff especially when it's the internet and all those fears and insecurities are to the fore ... very impressive.
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  • Vespertine

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #43 on: April 04, 2014, 11:59 »
    Wow, what an awesome start to my day!!! Beaming!!!! :)
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #44 on: April 04, 2014, 17:24 »
    Wow, what an awesome start to my day!!! Beaming!!!! :)
    You can indeed be proud of what you did, sharing your personal issues (for lack of a better word). :cool

    It's important to realise that it's normal that we aren't "normal", nobody is "normal". There's nothing "wrong" with us. We're all simply "different" in various aspects. :)
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  • « Last Edit: April 04, 2014, 21:05 by Fus87 »
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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #45 on: April 04, 2014, 19:24 »

    It's important to realise that it's normal that we aren't "normal", nobody is "normal. There's nothing "wrong" with us. We're all simply "different" in various aspects. :)

    *insert random Focault quote here*  ;)
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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #46 on: May 06, 2014, 10:57 »
    Maybe doed not fit here, but does show how different we have become


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    AG

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #47 on: May 06, 2014, 11:02 »
    yeah I watched this.

    Really ... social media has to be managed in your life.  If you are forgoing real life events for online ones on a regular basis .. then you need to cut back.

    But social media does have a place. 
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #48 on: May 06, 2014, 17:47 »
    Maybe does not fit here, but does show how different we have become
    It definitely belongs in this thread. I'll need more time to respond to this but it raises so many important issues.

    Of course I just watched that video on my laptop, while sitting in a cafe. So...

    Much to ponder though. I've got lots to say on the matter.
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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #49 on: May 06, 2014, 17:49 »
    The irony of watching it on youtube and posting vwas not lost on me either
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  • Eric

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #50 on: May 09, 2014, 17:07 »
    I'm usually very thick skinned when it comes to this sort of thing (mostly because I talk a lot of sh*t myself and know that almost all of the time, it's just some lighthearted fun with no malicious intent to it) happening to me, but I have been quite stubbornly depressed for the last three or so months, and so sometimes a throwaway remark can be really hurtful. Especially because my depression manifests itself in overpowering feelings of self hatred, so if somebody presses the right buttons, it'll reinforce my self-evaluation that there's literally not a single positive thing about my prolonged existence on this planet, and that's when my thoughts get really dark.

    There are a few personal topics I'm really sensitive about, because even in the deepest pits of self-loathing, they're things I can cling onto, remind myself that I'm not all that much of a waster. And I'm sure I'm not alone in this, reading through this thread, there are quite a few people on this relatively isolated corner of the internet that have self esteem issues; magnify that onto a huge scale like what you get with Twitter and of course there are going to be greater instances of people suffering psychological damage.

    Not that I expect people anywhere, least of all on the internet, to walk on eggshells around me - if you want to go through life without ever having to hear some unpleasant things being said about you then your only chance is to lock yourself in a room and throw away the key. But I can definitely understand and sympathise with people who are really deeply affected by things they read on the internet. Nobody likes to cop abuse, least of all when you're in a fragile state of mind.

    What does annoy me about people on the internet giving it large is those that do it to blow off their own steam. It's straight disrespect to take out whatever it is that's put you in a bad mood on the people that aren't responsible for it, people who are effectively complete strangers. Though I suppose this is somewhat healthier than what I do, turning it entirely inwards. Come to think of it, that really is somewhat amusing. During my bouts I'm too polite to take it out on everybody - which should indicate to myself that at the end of it, at least I have a strong code of personal ethics that I never break under any circumstances, which of course is a good thing - but I never seem to think about it like that.

    I think at the end of it, the internet is a good thing, that is occasionally misused by people. In the same way as any other technology really, it has no inherent characteristics to it; it's how an individual uses it that determines whether it's 'bad' or not and so the blame should go on the user, not the technology. For me, the internet has been a Godsend, because I can frankly talk about the personal issues I raised earlier, which I wouldn't be able to do otherwise. I posted this so casually, without really caring how it would be received, whereas if I would be far too afraid and embarrassed to bring this up with people I know physically. Even with people who would have a vested interest in my situation improving, like a therapist, I wouldn't feel comfortable opening up to this degree.
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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #51 on: May 09, 2014, 20:15 »
    Thank you Alphabet for sharing your innermost thoughts. I do hope you find a way out of your dark and gloomy place really soon. Sharing your story contribute to keep VR an open and friendly place! 
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  • AG

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #52 on: May 10, 2014, 00:58 »
    For me, the internet has been a Godsend, because I can frankly talk about the personal issues I raised earlier, which I wouldn't be able to do otherwise. I posted this so casually, without really caring how it would be received, whereas if I would be far too afraid and embarrassed to bring this up with people I know physically. Even with people who would have a vested interest in my situation improving, like a therapist, I wouldn't feel comfortable opening up to this degree.

    :hug Alphabet

    this part is definitely true for me too.

    I had some pretty major issues a few years back, and the friends I made on the internet (on a forum even) helped me an amazing amount.  Much more than my friends in real life - simply because I had been able to open up and address my issues on the 'net ....

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  • Slow Rider

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #53 on: May 10, 2014, 01:26 »
    It's interesting that so many of you find it much easier to talk about important stuff to people they don't in person. I have the opposite: I love talking to people online and discussing things with them, but if there's anything serious going on then I'd much rather call a friend or family and meet to talk face-to-face. They know me better, and usually know something of the context as well. I don't feel there are any things I can't discuss with them - of course I choose who to discuss what with, but overall there's someone for all kinds of issues I might have.

    But then again, those issues are never depressions or really serious stuff for me, so that may have something to do with it as well.

    In fact, I'm often quite reluctant to share things online. Especially on public places, where everyone who reads back a topic months later can still see it. Not sure exactly why. I don't mind reading others' stories at all, to the contrary, but it would take quite something for me to share on a similar level without knowing the other in person.
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  • AG

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #54 on: May 10, 2014, 01:47 »
    Not everything SR.   

    Most of the things that are important to me I talk to my friends and family about.

    But with my fertility issues, it was something I simply couldnt talk about in person.  Not having someone right there in front of me made it so that I could actually talk.  Before finding that forum, I just bottled it up inside ... as actually talking about it simply wasnt an option.

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  • Eric

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #55 on: May 10, 2014, 06:52 »
    It's interesting that so many of you find it much easier to talk about important stuff to people they don't in person. I have the opposite: I love talking to people online and discussing things with them, but if there's anything serious going on then I'd much rather call a friend or family and meet to talk face-to-face. They know me better, and usually know something of the context as well. I don't feel there are any things I can't discuss with them - of course I choose who to discuss what with, but overall there's someone for all kinds of issues I might have.

    But then again, those issues are never depressions or really serious stuff for me, so that may have something to do with it as well.

    In fact, I'm often quite reluctant to share things online. Especially on public places, where everyone who reads back a topic months later can still see it. Not sure exactly why. I don't mind reading others' stories at all, to the contrary, but it would take quite something for me to share on a similar level without knowing the other in person.

    I kinda understand where you're coming from. It really depends on the place and it's atmosphere. I can't make a personal post like that somewhere like on CN, which has such a hostile atmosphere. VR on the other hand is really friendly and supportive. No disrespect to people who like CN, it's not a bad forum at all, but there's definitely a vibe of negativity about that place as opposed to over here.
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  • Havetts

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #56 on: May 10, 2014, 20:06 »
    Maybe doed not fit here, but does show how different we have become


    Look Up:




    The video makes a very good point. Generations now are growing up with technology and can not even imagine living without it anymore. Case in point was my roommate in Winnipeg. He has a little three year old daughter, the kid hasnt learnt how to read yet, doesnt speak coherent sentences, just some random words, still poops in a diaper but manages to use an iPhone. Then whenever the kid needs to be entertained she constantly keeps repeating the word PHONE to her dad, and isnt satisfied until she has the phone.

    She has a plastic drum kit, all kind of toys and still screams for the iPhone the whole day. And that made me think back of my youth, granted I dont remember much of when I was 4. But in the later years, I spent my days outside, playing cops & robbers with the other kids in the neighbourhood, playing hide and seek or variants of it. Playing football. And when it was around 6 o clock, and it was dinnertime the parents' would whistle on their fingers, so loud that everybody in the neighbourhood heard it. Then we'd all look up and check who's parents had whistled for dinner.

    I grew up with a gameboy too. When I was 7 or 8, I bought one of my saved pocket money.  And even then, I only used it in the car on our way to relatives, or when we were in the car on our way to the holiday destination. But we always played outside, till middle school. We had a gamecube as well when I was 10, and sometimes we went inside to play on it when the weather was terrible.

    Then I look back to kids that are three or four years younger than me, and they didnt really play outside as much as "we" did. They spent more time inside or playing with consoles or the moderner mobile phones, not smartphones yet, but they got more modern.

    And nowadays you see people who are not able to converse without a mobile phone or social media, theyre simply addicted to their smartphone/tablet/whatever. Now I'm an introvert, but I know how to start a conversation, or to be social. It took me a while though, middleschool was a bitch with regards to social development, eventhough I was never bullied, I always kind of am late with discovering things socially etc. Living & working in Canada & Germany has really helped with that too and so have my friends who I consider irreplacable. But yea to come back on the whole phone thing, I wonder how these kids who are now four years old will behave when theyre at my age, 21.

    But I find it hard to "really" open myself, both online and in real life. I think I can count the people that really really know me well on three hands. I can convey what I think, but I never "really" open my feelings, if that makes sense. I am not depressed, thank god after reading what you all have been through, and I enjoy life every single day. I dunno, I'm just me :lol


    ( I really have to learn how to coherently write a story that just doesnt go from A to B, to C, to B to A to C :D )
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #57 on: May 10, 2014, 22:22 »
    She has a plastic drum kit... :o
    I think I've discovered this young child's predicament. Real drums may be just the cure!  :P


    Seriously though, you've raised a lot of very concerning issues. But I will say I am encouraged by the fact that even you, at your tender young age, had a childhood that quite resembled mine in terms of playing sports outside until someone's parents beckoned for dinner (my next door neighbor used a large bell on the back porch to summon her three kids!)


    But here is the real problem:
    And nowadays you see people who are not able to converse without a mobile phone or social media, theyre simply addicted to their smartphone/tablet/whatever.
    What's most alarming about this to me is that it is hardly a condition limited to youth. I am staggered by the brainwashing that has taken place amongst older adults too.

    Just last week I attended a very small Independent Film Festival in a neighboring town. It took place in a local historic building, and the film for that evening was preceded by a solo musical performance by a local 21-year-old, singer/songwriter girl. She was only performing three short songs. But during that entire time, a grey-haired woman sitting next to me, who was most likely in her mid-60s, never put down her iPhone. At first she appeared to be checking emails, then reading some lengthy text...then she was playing a game. I was so discouraged by this. There were probably only 30 people in this small room, and this woman simply could not place herself in the moment. So what chance will someone have who is raised on this technology?

    About ten years ago, when I could really start to see the landscape changing, I envisioned a point in the future where the youth of the day would rebel against the very notion of constantly being monitored, of being tracked on their cell phones, of always having to be within digital reach of their parents, of never having a private moment to themselves. I no longer have any faith that such a movement will ever take place.

    I can't imagine the pressure of growing up in today's world of TwitterBookagram. Just simply "keeping up" must be taking a toll in countless, unseen ways. I often wonder what the next generation will do...when the power goes out.
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  • Claudio Cappuccino

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #58 on: May 11, 2014, 10:22 »
    I often wonder what the next generation will do...when the power goes out.
    A very good question. When all computers fail the youth of now will not know what to do, they will have to think for themselves, something that appears not to be in the schoolbooks anymore.

    Judgement Day is coming...

    But it is not only the youth, it is also present day. When at my job our CRM system fails some of my collegues do not know what to do anymore. True, the CRM system is important but you can also just pick up a pen and a piece of paper and go work with that.
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Re: Trolling and Abuse
    « Reply #59 on: December 06, 2014, 17:24 »
    A good thread worth bumping...


    Just came across this.

    http://www.vox.com/xpress/2014/12/6/7342171/trolls-einstein-curie

    Quote
    Einstein's advice to Marie Curie on dealing with trolls: "Don't read that hogwash"

    Trolls are not a new problem.

    Way back in 1911, in fact, Albert Einstein was giving Marie Curie advice on how to deal with them, as astrobiologist David Grinspoon recently discovered in a huge trove of new Einstein letters put online this week.

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