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The Hour record
« on: February 28, 2014, 10:22 »
The Hour record

Ok so we have a fabian thread but news is hoting up, so I thought a Genral thread for all info and if we want we can have individual for those riders who have a go

Rule Changes:

+ they are reverting to one single record which will be based on rules for current track bikes
+ Boardman, Obree's timings etc will be re-instated in the record books along with those of Moser, Indurain and Rominger
+ Bizarrely, the record time will remain at 49.700 by Ondřej Sosenka because that time was set within the rules of the time even thought it was slower than now valid times

1st up



Ondřej Sosenka has been in the press saying he will have another go at the record this year, some time after Fabs I think.


Hour record regulations could see changes by mid-year

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  • « Last Edit: October 23, 2014, 16:57 by froome19, Reason: Frontpage added content. »
    Of course, if this turns out someday to be the industry standard integrated handlebar-computer-braking solution then I'll eat my kevlar-reinforced aerodynamic hat.

    Larri Nov 12, 2014

    Echoes

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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #1 on: February 28, 2014, 12:18 »
    Hang Cookson High !

    The Hour is on a traditional bike, with the three-point rule and without air-penetration enhancement. Otherwise it does not mean anything.

    Marcel Berthet would have held the record from 1929 to 1984 if any kind of bike was allowed.

    Moser beat Merckx's record in 1994, at age 40. Meaningless ! 
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  • "Paris-Roubaix is the biggest cycling race in the world, bigger than the Tour de France, bigger than any other bike race" (Sir Bradley Wiggins)

    Blackbandit222

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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #2 on: February 28, 2014, 16:34 »
    I'm excited by the HR Record being back in the news.  Let's just have a Big Show Down weekend with 8 TTers from different countries Durbo, Phinney, Malori, Fabs, Tuft, Wiggins or Dowsett, Martin and Kwaitkowski !!!!   :D
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    LukasCPH

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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #3 on: March 08, 2014, 13:45 »
    I think it wouldn't be the same if Cancellara did the Hour under new rules. It wouldn't be as legendary as if he did it under Merckx conditions (old rules), and if they then change the rules, just did it again.
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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #5 on: April 15, 2014, 18:35 »
    And that is why the heads of sports federations shouldn't just "say something".
    I'll grant that Cookson makes fewer of these blunders than McQuaid (Pat had one per week), but even these few are too many.

    Cancellara is the biggest star of cycling nowadays, and his Hour Record attempt could re-juvenate this almost-forgotten discipline. Instead of throwing sticks in his spokes, they should at least have a dialogue with him and his folks on how to manage this to the best for all sides.
    Christ, it can't be that hard, can it? :fp
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  • Blackbandit222

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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #6 on: April 15, 2014, 19:06 »
    I think it wouldn't be the same if Cancellara did the Hour under new rules. It wouldn't be as legendary as if he did it under Merckx conditions (old rules), and if they then change the rules, just did it again.

    I hate to say it but I'm in favor of TT bikes!!  I grew up w/ Obree & Boardman and total obsurdity in terms of bikes.  I'm sure whatever Trek supplies him with will be relatively tame in comparison.  We should have a BM/AM record by that I mean Before & After Moser.

    Honestly, it's like in Baseball when they try to support Babe Ruth's Home Run record!  The times have changed everything has advanced not just the bikes but training methods, etc.
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  • Echoes

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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #7 on: April 15, 2014, 19:57 »
    Training methods mainly changed because equipment changed since the eighties but as I showed in several of my biographies, riders from the seventies already followed very advanced training methods.

    About technology I'll try to expand on the arguments I touched upon above, which I think are hard to counter.

    The UCI had already cancelled several attempts against the Hour record long before Moser.

    We have the case of Marcel Berthet. It wasn't exactly cancelled because Berthet made his performances knowing full well the UCI wouldn't accept it but still...

    In 1933, Marcel Berthet set hour performances of 48.600km and then 49.992km despite the age of 47. It means that he was faster than Merckx, Boardman 2000 and Sosenka.

    Berthet rode on a stramlined bike, not sanctioned by the UCI of course and as I said he knew it before setting them. So it was just for fun.



    In 1934, Francis Faure broke Oscar Egg's Hour record by more than 800m: 45.055km vs 44.247km. That time it was originally considered a new record before the UCI decided to cancel it (I think Egg lodged a complaint but that needs verif. ;))

     

    My point is that first those two men set the first "best hour performances" as they are known today, though that label appeared long after their death.

    ..and second, more importantly, if the UCI had already acted against some new technology added to a bike in a long time past, why can't they act again? They had set precedents in the thirties, so why should they suddenly become more liberal?

    After all lenticular wheels and funny bike frames were not sanctioned by the UCI in 1984, so normally, Moser's record is illegal. The problem is that the UCI acted 16 years later while they should've cancelled it straightway. But it remains that it was illegal and they should've done what they have done for Francis Faure.   

    Edit: by the way, doesn't this thread belong to the track section?
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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #8 on: May 15, 2014, 14:38 »
    The rules are being changed
    http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/news/latest-news/hour-record-rule-change-athletes-hour-scrapped-123397

    basically
    + they are reverting to one single record which will be based on rules for current track bikes
    + Boardman, Obree's timings etc will be re-instated in the record books along with those of Moser, Indurain and Rominger
    + Bizarrely, the record time will remain at 49.700 by Ondřej Sosenka because that time was set within the rules of the time even thought it was slower than now valid times

    So this opens the way for track bikes and modern technology to be used in hour attempts.

    I guess some will say that this opens the way for Wiggins etc to tackle the hour, and with Boardman and Obree's times being re-instated Brian is showing some favouritism. On the other hand, this finally gets the hour record to a sensible state, and hopefully paves the way for it to get back some of its prestige by top riders of teh day attempting it.

    In theory, Sosenka's time should now be very easy to beat, and getting him off top of the record books would maybe be a good thing all things considered.
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  • KeithJamesMc

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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #9 on: May 15, 2014, 14:51 »
    I would argue that Brian and his buddy have been listening to lobbying from Trek for Cancellara ;)
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  • hiero

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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #10 on: May 15, 2014, 15:36 »
    I think it wouldn't be the same if Cancellara did the Hour under new rules. It wouldn't be as legendary as if he did it under Merckx conditions (old rules), and if they then change the rules, just did it again.

    That would indeed be legendary! I think Canc could take both hour records.
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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #12 on: May 18, 2014, 21:33 »
    So many people approving the reform is really beyond me !! They really have understanding of what it means. They really don't know the Hour Record means. Besides they all fail to give arguments to my Francis Faure jurisprudence.

    There are no cycling fans anymore. There's no cycling anymore !
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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #14 on: July 15, 2014, 10:41 »
    Great.
    Spartacus, the Panzerwagen and Sir Wiggo all considering the biggest feat in cycling. The Hour is back, baby!

    Now we only need someone to invest in enabling an interesting coverage of the attempts - split-screen comparisons with Merckx/Sosenka/Boardman/each other, calculations of time/distance to go, a packed velodrome etc.
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  • Echoes

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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #15 on: July 15, 2014, 10:47 »
    He's to do it on an aerobike.

    So no value in my eyes, regardless. Nothing to see, folks.  ;)
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #16 on: July 15, 2014, 10:51 »
    He's to do it on an aerobike.

    So no value in my eyes, regardless. Nothing to see, folks.  ;)
    Of course he is. He'd be stupid not to; it's allowed under the new rules.

    Weren't you the one saying that the UCI (or whatever its predecessor was called) was stupid not to approve the records made in the 1930s on a fully streamlined bike? You have double standards, in my opinion.
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  • Echoes

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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #17 on: July 15, 2014, 10:57 »
    On the contrary if I reminded you of these old facts (on this very thread), it's to show that the ban is justified. There were precedents before the 2000 ban. Aerodynamic gains have never been tolerated.

    But of course if I'm saying something and people think I'm saying the opposite, I won't make myself understood.  :S
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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #18 on: July 15, 2014, 11:00 »
    On the contrary if I reminded you of these old facts (on this very thread), it's to show that the ban is justified. There were precedents before the 2000 ban. Aerodynamic gains have never been tolerated.

    But of course if I'm saying something and people think I'm saying the opposite, I won't make myself understood.  :S
    OK, point taken, I mis-remembered your earlier post.
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  • Echoes

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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #19 on: August 06, 2014, 16:42 »
    Part of my upcoming Oscar Egg bio in which I discussed the performances by Berthet and Faure and the UCI's historical campaign against aerodynamics, the Moser performances which were illegal, the counter-reform of 2000 and the counter-counter-reform of 2014.

    I fail to see how it can be disputed that the Hour Record should have strict rules with regards to aerodynamics. The contest was really falsified by Moser and the UCI's laxness. Wake up, "cycling fans" !

    ------------------

    1933 : New Technologies to Break Egg’s Hour

    A)   Berthet’s Streamliner

    By 1933 there were rumours of  a return to competition for Oscar Egg in order to reach the 50km mark in an hour with the new rocket bike that he manufactured: http://bentmania.free.fr/site/index.php/velo-couche/velo-couche/une-petite-histoire-du-velo.html

    He never came back but old rival Marcel Berthet took it seriously and did go for it, at age 47 on a “streamliner”.

    The story of these hour performances non-sanctioned by the UCI is VERY important as it gives historical background for the UCI’s decision (anno 2000) to cancel the “records” on aero-bikes since Francesco Moser in 1984 and rehabilitate the Merckx record and shows how absurd and anti-tradition the decision by the UCI in 2014 was to tolerate again “devices that cut wind resistance.”

    But first we need to give some sort of historical perspective to Berthet’s new performances.

    Already in the very first cycle races riders realized that drafting wheels cost a lot less effort to maintain the speed than leading. From that observation, some riders started racing behind motors or tandems, they were called stayers. Along came the first tandem-paced or motor-paced hour records, the latter exceeded 100km in 1913. http://bentmania.free.fr/site/index.php/velo-couche/velo-couche/une-petite-histoire-du-velo.html (in French)

    The derny-paced hour record still exist today and is owned by Dutchman Maas van Beek, since 2012. Who in the cycling world would consider a motor-paced hour record as a genuine hour record? Nobody. Yet the aim of motor pacing is just the same as that of the modern aero-bikes: cutting wind resistance. Therefore, it should be logical for the UCI to treat the two the same way!

    So by 1913 the magazine “L’illustration” reported that “the motor-paced Hour record exceeded 100km while the Hour record without pacemaker was only just 43km.” What is known today as the “Hour Record” has often been labeled “Hour Record without pacemaker” (“record de l’heure sans entraineur”). This fact illustrates once again that riders have never been entitled to all the most advanced technological devices in order to break the official Hour Record, unlike some liberal idealists might think, otherwise motor-pacing would be allowed in the same category as the official Hour Record!

    However still in Autumn 1913 while he was the Hour record holder Marcel Berthet started working with an expert in aerodynamism and a pioneer in aviation: Étienne Bunau-Varilla.

    Bunau-Varilla was an airplane pilot who took part in the first internetional air meeting in Reims in 1909 with a Farman biplane. It should be mentioned that French/British aviator Henri Farman was a cyclist and even a French stayer champion. So were the Wright brothers. Along with engineer Marcel Riffard, Bunau-Varilla designed the so-called “Vélo-Torpille” (Torpedo-bike) with a special removable fairing in order to cut wind resistance. The machine was nicknamed: “Berthet’s Egg” (!). Berthet broke several records with it in 1913:

    250m in 17.4”
    5km in 5’46”04
    1km in 1’04” despite strong side wind and later in the same day in 1’02”. He broke the record by 8”, says an article from “Le sport illustré” http://veloretrocourse.proboards.com/thread/1056/maillots-tales-2-marcel-berthet The article noticed that Berthet was not even a sprinter and wonders what the likes of Gabriel Poulain, Frank Kramer or Léon Hourlier would have done with the same machine.

    Egg set a world record for the 1km flying start at ~1'08", one year later.

    On Christmas’ Eve Berthet raced a pursuit match against tandem riders Charron and Rousseau and improved is 5km record: 5’39”03.

    Some German manufacturers like Göricke and Brennabor prepared their own versions of the Torpedo-bike and Germany’s Arthur Stellbrink broke Berthet’s record in Berlin in early 1914: 5’23”.

    The UCI decided to stop the madness after that event and so article 31 of the UCI ruling in 1914 said:

    Quote
    "Les machines de tous types sont légales, équipées ou non de composants tels que changement de vitesse, roues libres, etc., à condition qu'elles fonctionnent seulement par la force de l'homme, qu'elles ne requièrent pas d'appendice ou dispositif pour réduire la résistance de l'air et qu'elles n'excèdent pas les dimensions de 2 mètres en longueur et 75 centimètres en largeur. Ceci s'applique aux machines à un seul cycliste qui occupent une seule file".

    Which roughly translates :

    « Machines of all kinds are legal, equipped or not of components such as gear shifting, freewheels, etc on the ground that they are functioning by the only strength of man, that it does not require any appendix or device to cut wind resistance and that it does not exceed a length of 2m and a width of 75cm. This applies to the machines with only one cyclist who occupies only one line.”

    The records by Berthet are not completely cancelled though because the UCI would assign to them the label: “record with bike equipped with a device to cut wind resistance”. Doesn’t this label ring any bell? It’s roughly the same kind of labels that the UCI will apply to the post-Moser record in 2000: “Best Hour Performance”!

    History repeats itself.

    This website confirms this fact:
    “Starting from 1913 records were broken with aerodynamically faired racing cycles (5, 6). However, the governing body of bicycle racing, the Union Cycliste International (UCI), did not view these as regular records and tried to prevent any possible technical advantages to individual racers by changing the regulations. Racing should serve as a comparison of athetes, not a comparison of technology. Because of that the most important incentive to aerodynamic improvements to the bicycle was omitted going forward.”
    His sources being:
    1.   Gronen, Wolfgang: The History of Human Powered Land Speed Records. in: Third International Human Powered Vehicle Scientific Symposium. Proceedings. Indianapolis 1986. pp. 84 – 88
    2.   Gronen, Wolfgang; Lemke, Walter: Geschichte des Radsports, des Fahrrades. Eupen 1978


    All this story shows that Oscar Egg’s final record was the first one performed under the new rules. It means that he was not allowed any devices to cut wind resistance! This article would apply to EVERY Hour record from Egg 1914 till Merckx 1972 (+ between 2000 and 2013) but it was also valid in 1984 when Moser made his two hour performances in January 1984 and he broke it, which the UCI ignored.


    A lot of people still think that Moser’s record was legal. On this CN article a comment says: He broke no rules, he was fast, but I guess if he used a method later banned, all anyone can really say is that going really fast in that way is just not surprising or worthy of record holder status.”

    Nothing could be wronger. Moser blatantly broke rules with his wheels: the spokes being “covered by carbon-fibre fairings to minimize air turbulence”: http://www.timetriallingforum.co.uk/?showtopic=29344
    Besides his funny bike with a lower front wheel than back wheel is an obvious device to cut air resistance.

    In 1984, article 31 of the UCI ruling of 1914, became article 49. When Moser broke his “record” Merckx lodged a complaint to the UCI via the Belgian federation because it broke articles 49 and 51 of the UCI ruling. The Belgian added that he was offered to race some disc wheels himself in his 1972 attempt but the UCI commissars refused it.

    Here is another confirmation that aerodynamic gain were still not tolerated by the UCI in 1984 (even though this website does not mention Moser once but rather talks about the L.A. Olympics):

    Starting in 1982 Kyle and others developed the technical configuration for the US Olympic Cycling Team for the '84 olympics in Los Angeles. Some aerodynamic components already existed beforehand, e.g. the aero helmets of the Czechoslovakian team. But now for the first time the complete system of the bicycle and rider was aerodynamically optimized. UCI regulations specify a conventional seating position and also forbid any aerodynamic accessories. Not forbidden, however, is the aerodynamic arrangement of functionally necessary components.
    This means for example that covering a spoked wheel with plastic sheet is forbidden, since this has no basic function - it serves only aerodynamics. It is different however, if the wheel has so few spokes that it is not sufficiently stable in itself for racing applications and sufficient stiffness can be achieved only by the additional basic function of the disk (made from composite material).


    Obviously the UCI rejected Merckx’s legitimate complaint at first. However 16 years later they finally realized that they had made a mistake, while in the meantime the record had been completely falsified (Théo Mathy said it multiple times on RTBF) and at everyone’s reach.

    The debate for a (counter-)reform had started by October 1996, shortly before the World Championship, while Boardman made the final performance now labeled “Best Hour”. They issued the “Lugano Charter” which gave strict criteria for the Hour record: triangle frame, 16 spoke wheels of equal diameter etc and a helmet that should only be meant for safety without any devices or shape that intended to cut wind resistance: http://archives.lesoir.be/l-heure-la-plus-eprouvante-d-eddy-merckx-_t-20121020-0251YR.html (in French).

    This charter was effective in 2000. When this (counter-)reform was enforced, everybody thought it was something new and that the UCI never had such rules before. We’ve just seen that it was just a modern version of its own ruling of 1914 and that all hour record between Oscar Egg and Eddy Merckx were set within the framework of that rule.

    So when in 2014, President Cookson of the UCI decided to cancel this rule again, everybody in the cycling world, whether spectators or cyclists, were happy to see an “absurd” rule disappear. It shows how the cycling fans nowadays are ignorant of the sport’s history.

    On May 2014 Wiggins told Cyclingnews: "We've lost a decade now of the hour record. It's a shame that they changed it. It's a shame, really, that we've missed maybe [Fabian] Cancellara doing it five or six years ago. So it's good I guess that they've gone back now." http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/wiggins-interested-in-hour-record

    It begs the question who ever stopped Wiggins from going for the Hour on a bike that fits with the rules, like all those past greats. Besides, Cancellara did not lose a record because of the rule against aerodynamics but he did lose a record on a traditional bike that he was preparing when incompetent Cookson decided to cancel the rule, encouraging Cancellara to postpone his attempt and to do it on a aero bikes, making his attempt worthless in any case!

    "It kind of begs the question: Why did they change it in the first place?," Wiggins asked Saturday following stage 7 at the Tour of California.

    Wiggins is a talented rider but he’s not a historian. The “change in the first place” occurred in 1984 and was consecutive to Moser’s illegal hour performances. The “Lugano Charter” was a back to the roots reform. It’s the UCI finally being in tune with itself and with its own rule that they set 100 years before Wiggins’ comments: article 31 of the 1914 UCI ruling when they defined for the first time what a real bike was, when they argued that the Hour contest should be a comparison between athlete performances and not between technologies, in the same way as the previously considered a motor-paced hour record as an unofficial hour record. All hour records ever since were broken within the context of that rule from Egg to Merckx, plus Boardman in 2000 and Sosenka (though a 50+ hematocrit rider).

    There are no such things as an hour record being set with all the technology available since already Oscar Egg wasn’t allowed to the “vélo-torpille”/streamliner that Berthet had used for records on shorter distances…

    Berthet did not intend to break the Egg hour since he knew in advance that the UCI would not sanction it as such. However they were official performances that fell under the category “Vélos spéciaux avec dispositif pour réduire la résistance de l'air" (“Bike with special devices to cut air resistance”).

    Berthet had been retired from cycle races for many years but he called back engineer Marcel Riffard to design a new streamliner. These have evolved since 1913 and took several shapes. The one Berthet will use covers the whole bike to the bottom of the wheels. The front wheel was smaller than the rear wheel (just like Moser, 51 years later!). It was called “Vélodyne”.

    The first attempt occurred in August 1933 on the Parc des Princes. He covered 48.6km. On September 9 he made a second attempt but a tyre blew and he crashed while heading towards the 52km. The third attempt occurred on November 19 1933 (while Egg’s record had already been broken) and he covered 49.922km. It’s more than the present-day record by Sosenka on a traditional bike! He was aged 47!

    B)   Francis Faure’s Recumbent

    The recumbent was an invention by French manufacturer Charles Mochet who first designed a  four-wheeled bike: "Human Powered Vehicle" (HPV) or vélo-car and then divided into two two-wheelers because it was too dangerous.

    The story of Faure’s recumbent has been told in great details on this webpage:

    On the racing side Mochet was looking out for a good rider to ride his new recumbent bike in cycling events. At first Mochet had Henri Lemoine, a pro cyclist, riding it. Henri was astonished at the comfort and how easy it was to steer. Even so, he couldn't be convinced to ride the Velocar in contests. Perhaps it was the ridicule of other cyclists that kept him from riding it in competition. In any case Henri Lemoine never entered a single cycling event on a recumbent bike, much to his loss.
    Mochet's second choice of riders was Francis Faure, brother of the famous cyclist Benoit Faure[inaccurate, author’s comment]. Francis was a decidedly lesser rider than either Lemoine or his brother Benoit. But he was the first serious cyclist who really took an interest in Mochet's recumbent bike. After a few test rides he decided to enter a race riding it.
    At the start this event the other riders laughed at him and said: "Faure, you must be tired and want to go to take a nap on that thing. Why don't you sit up upright and pedal like a man?" They quit laughing when Faure poured his annoyance into the pedals and left them all behind. They couldn't even get close to him. Afterwards they were upset that they couldn't even draft his funny bike. One after the other Francis Faure defeated every first-class track cyclist in Europe, taking advantage of recumbents' clear aerodynamic superiority.. The following year Faure was practically unbeatable in 5000 meter distance events. Even in races against three or four top riders, who would alternate pacing a leader, Faure would leave the Velodrome in the yellow jersey. Beside the successes on the track the Velocars and their riders won a lot of road races. Paul Morand, a road racer, won the Paris-Limoges in 1933 on a recumbent bike constructed by Mochet.
    After Faure had established new world records on various short courses and other cyclists on recumbents had handily beaten their competitors at road races, Charles and George Mochet as well as Faure decided to attack the hour record, long considered the "ultimate" bicycling record. Mochet wanted to be sure that a record with his split Velocar would be acknowledged. He therefore queried the UCI (Union Cycliste International) in October 1932. He received a positive reply to his letter: "The Velocar has no add-on aerodynamic components attached so there is no reason to forbid it."

    ---
    We need to correct one thing. Francis Faure is not famous Benoit Faure’s brother. It comes from a mistake by the Miroir des Sports which reported the Six-Days of St-Étienne in 1930 where Benoit Faure was injured and replaced by his “brother Francis”.  http://www.france-hpv.org/francis_faure/index.htm

    The response given by the UCI to Mochet is testament of a few things. First the recumbent does not have anything to do with research in aerodynamics. Second, the UCI at that time was OBSESSED with aerodynamics. Finally, the UCI already could not keep their promise but still who would consider an hour record on a recumbent as a proper hour record. So when Faure started his attempt, he clearly went for Egg’s record, unlike Berthet.

    The website Helsinki.fi continues:

    The 7th of July 1933 was to be the decisive historical day. Francis Faure rode 45.055 km (27.9 miles) in one hour on a Paris velodrome and thereby smashed the almost 20 year old record by Oscar Egg. Faure and Mochet's Velocar abruptly grabbed the media's attention. In journals and cycling magazines pictures of the record setting vehicles were being published. Soon questions were asked: Is this actually a bike? Will the Faure record be acknowledged? Will the common bike be obsoleted by the Velocar? Statements, interviews, comments and "political" cartoons all addressed this issue. […]

    Rousseau, the French UCI commissioner, brought the issue back into focus. He stated that the UCI and its rules were intended to regulate races, define the legal length and breadth of the bicycle, to prohibit addon aerodynamic aids, but not to define the bicycle itself.
    The other commissioners apparently disagreed, and designated a task force which would define, or in effect, re-define exactly what was or wasn't a bicycle. They then voted to recognize the (upright) record of Maurice Richard. Immediately thereafter the [new] definition of what constituted a sport bicycle was accepted by a 58-to-46 vote. The following rules would be in effect in UCI sanctioned racing from that point in history on:
    •   The bottom bracket had to be between 24 and 30 centimeters above the ground.
    •   The front of the saddle could only be 12 centimeters behind the bottom bracket.
    •   The distance from the bottom bracket to the axle of the front wheel had to be between 58 and 75 centimeters.
    According to these rules, a recumbent wasn't a bicycle, but something entirely different, despite having two wheels, a chain, handlebars, a seat, and human propulsion. The ruling would take effect on April 1, 1934. It was to be recumbents' darkest day. Faure's record was shuffled into a new category called: "Records Set By Human Powered Vehicles (HPV's) without Special Aerodynamic Features"
    Embittered by the decision of the UCI, Charles Mochet wrote an appeal letter to the Union de Cycliste. No luck. Rumors at the time were that the decision "banning" recumbents had less to do with sportsmanship than with economics: The upright bicycle manufacturers and professional riders had money and contacts and together formed a powerful lobbing force.


    So the performance by Francis Faure gave birth to a new category: "Records Set By Human Powered Vehicles (HPV's) without Special Aerodynamic Features". Again that category announces the one that the UCI coined in 2000 “Best Hour Performance”. Throughout the years and the decades, they acted the same way but how can we blame them for wishing a “comparison athletes”?

    The story of Mochet and Francis Faure did not stop there. They would try to best the Berthet record in the category: “Record Set By Special Bike with Aerodynamic Device” (same source):
    In 1938 Francis Faure and Georges Mochet decided to try to better the record of Marcel Berthet in the special class. Francis Faure also wanted to be the first cyclist to ride more than 50 kilometers in one hour. They produced a faired Velocar. The frame was modified: Faure sat lower and a smaller front wheel was installed to reduce drag.
    On March 5, 1939, Faure rode 50.537 kilometers in one hour requiring under 4:15 minutes to circle the 4000 meter track!
    […] Francis Faure became the first cyclist to travel 50 kilometers in less than one hour without a pace vehicle. He rode 50.537 kilometers on the Vicennes Municipal Cycling Track. The press went wild, both in Europe and the U.S. Pictures of Francis Faure, Georges Mochet and the Velocar appeared in all the bicycling journals.



    Illustrations

    Marcel Berthet in the "vélo-torpille" in 1913:



    With Étienne Bunau-Varilla:



    Article of Le sport illustré (which we used to as source) about Berthet 1km performance:



    Other picture of the "torpedo bike":



    The inside of the bike:



    Marcel Berthet in the "Vélodyne" in 1933, with which he made several hour performances:



    The attempt:



    Other picture:



    An article in English:



    Francis Faure's recumbent:



    The proof that Merckx lodged a complaint after Moser's Hour performances:

    http://www.timetriallingforum.co.uk/?showtopic=29344

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  • « Last Edit: August 11, 2014, 20:55 by Echoes »

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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #21 on: September 03, 2014, 14:53 »
    Voigt up 1st

    Connect with trekfactoryracing.com

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    I'm going to target the Hour Record on September 18

    Hello friends,
    Jensie here. I have big news, and I want Trek Factory Racing fans to be the first to hear it from me:

    On September 18 in Grenchen, Switzerland, I am going to attempt to break the hour record mark of 49,7 km, previously set by Ondrej Sosenka. It’s a huge challenge for me, both physical and mental. This is a huge project and probably it’s going to come as a surprise for many people. We have been doing some discrete tests in the velodrome in Roubaix prior to the Dauphiné and we believe that I have a fair chance.

    It’s a fascinating event: it’s super hard, but it’s a great discipline. Man and machine against the clock. A lot of logistics comes in play: when, where, how, etc. But I didn’t have to convince anybody: both Trek and our GM Luca Guercilena were all exited when I told them about my idea. They gave me a lot of support. Luckily we could use some of the blueprints that were being drawn for Fabian, so we kind of hit the ground running.

    I look at this as one last present for my fans. I want to give them something to smile about - before the final curtain falls. But also: I want to do a good performance. This is not a circus act. The ‘hour’ has lost some of its magic over the last years. Maybe my attempt could kick off a new round of hour-record attempts. I could establish a mark for everyone to give it a try. Make a bridge, you know. I raced against Boardman, Indurain and Sosenka. And I’m racing with Fabian and his generation. If I make it, it would be sandwiched between those names. I can pave the way for them. I have no illusion to keep the record once Fabian and other specialists start having a go. But I kind of like the idea of telling me grand children about it, when they sit on my lap when I’m 75.

    Trek developed a really good bike for me, based on the super fast SpeedConcept, and we did some testing with different skin suits, helmets, positions, etc. I’m training very hard for the attempt. I have the Tour de France as a base layer and then I did some altitude racing in Utah and Colorado. My near-win in Colorado Springs, where I was caught with 700 meters to go, was a good reference in terms of power output. I basically was out there for one hour by myself. I had this attempt in mind that very day, besides taking the stage, of course.

    Why I do this? Why not! Everyone saw the memo from the UCI. It’s been four months and I honestly find it quite strange that nobody has given it a try so far. We have 18 WorldTour teams, plus more than a 1000 pro continental riders and an immense group of amateurs that also can have a go. I’m not to blame that I take the chances that life - or in this case the UCI - gives me. I’m the first one that’s brave enough to do it. Everybody had the same time frame to be ready for it.

    The hour record is one of the oldest events in our sport. I want to put a little bit of light and focus on this. The UCI wanted to give back some recognition to the event and I follow their reasoning. It will be no pleasure cruise, but I’m really convinced that I can make it. It’s never 100 percent sure, of course, but I worked hard and I will keep working hard until the day is there.

    I always ride my best when you are cheering for me, so I'm asking you to cheer one more time. Join me at the Velodrome Suisse by getting tickets at the link below, or join the conversation on Twitter with #HourRecord.

    Best,
    Jens Voigt



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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #22 on: September 03, 2014, 14:58 »
    Ninja'd  :lol
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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #23 on: September 03, 2014, 15:12 »
    Quote
    MEDIA RELEASE

    HOUR RECORD ATTEMPT WITH JENS VOIGT / TREK FACTORY RACING

    On Thursday evening, September 18th, the professional cyclist Jens Voigt from Trek Factory Racing will try to improve the hour record at the Velodrome Suisse in Grenchen, Switzerland as last big step of his career.

    The hour record is one of the most prestigious in cycling. The first hour record with 35,325 km was set 1893 by the founder of the Tour de France, Henri Desgrange. The current record is at 49.700 km set in 2005 by Ondrej Sosenka.

    Jens Voigt is already a legend of the sport and with this record will retire on top of the world.

    Welcoming this announcement, UCI President Brian Cookson said: “I'm delighted that one of the most popular riders of the modern era, Jens Voigt, is going to make an attempt on this, the most iconic of all the UCI's records. It is exactly what we hoped would happen when we changed the rules earlier this year to allow the use of modern track bike design and technology. Jens has proven over a long career to be one of the very best riders at the long lone effort, and cycling fans around the world will be delighted with this news. Having been present myself at two previous Hour records, I'm sure his attacking style and willingness to commit himself 100% will provide a superb spectacle. And, like Jens, I too am hoping that this will be the beginning of a new wave of interest in 'The Magic Hour', as it was known in a previous golden era of our sport.”

    The agenda for the hour record:

    5.30pm: doors open
    6pm: interviews and entertainment
    7pm: start of the hour record
    8pm: finish race, afterwards interviews
    Around 9pm: end of event

    The event is organized by IMG, the global leader in sports, fashion and media.

    Public and hospitality
    tickets are available Cycling fans can follow this hour record attempt live on site. Tickets are available on the website www.velodromesuisse.ch for CHF 25.- but also on site with an addition of CHF 3.-
    .
    As a special offer there are hospitality tickets available which can be booked on the website as well and which contains access to the Velodrome Suisse hospitality area with best view to the track and an exclusive catering.
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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #24 on: September 03, 2014, 15:15 »
    Jens just tweeted they are trying to get a live stream set up
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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #25 on: September 03, 2014, 15:59 »
    JENS!
    What a legend.

    Didn't get that last breakaway victory in Utah or Colorado - just goes for The Hour instead.
    :pray
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  • « Last Edit: September 03, 2014, 19:57 by Fus87 »

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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #26 on: September 03, 2014, 16:28 »
    :pray :pray :pray :pray :pray :pray :pray :pray :pray :pray :pray :pray
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  • RIP Keith

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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #28 on: September 10, 2014, 11:06 »
    I love the fact that - rather than talk about it for months and months - Jens has basically said, "yes, I'll have a go. How's next week for you?"

    I really want him to get it, and then for no-one else ever to attempt it, and then for Trek to build a statue of Jens in every city in the world.

    OK, getting carried away a bit there...
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  • He shook his head sadly and told me that endemic drug use had compelled him to give up a promising career. "Even one small local race, prize was a salami, and I see doping!" - Tim Moore: Gironimo (Riding the Very Terrible 1914 Tour of Italy)

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    Re: The Hour record
    « Reply #29 on: September 10, 2014, 23:33 »
    This better be on after 4 pm CEST.

    Otherwise I'll just have to take some hours off work. How often do you get to see a legend go out with a bang, no matter which way?
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