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DB-Coop

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Re: The Perfect Race
« Reply #60 on: March 03, 2015, 13:58 »
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #61 on: April 11, 2015, 23:14 »
    Ever since its introduction, I've been unsatisfied with the new route for the Ronde van Vlaanderen. The Oude Kwaremont-Paterberg combo just makes the course too backended, with almost everybody waiting for the last ascent to make their move.

    Therefore, I've decided to map a new, better final.
    It starts with a kasseizone with ~100 km to go: 14.5 km of cobbles, mostly flat, but including the Molenberg and Wolvenberg.

    The heuvelzone starts at the Oude Kwaremont (~50 km to go): 10 hills of varying difficulty, 6 of them cobbled, with the Mariaborrestraat and the Haaghoek (my favourite kasseistrook) thrown in for good measure.

    The start of the heuvelzone is very much like the parcours used this year - but after the Taaienberg we turn north towards ten Stene, Haaghoek and Leberg. The run-in to Oudenaarde features the Boigneberg and Eikenberg as last jumpboards for an attack, with the Eikenberg topping at just 6.1 km from the line.

    The final kilometres will go straight through the centre of Oudenaarde, with the many turns favouring solo riders or small groups over bigger groups.
    The finish line is at the same spot as now, only approached from the other direction.



    Name Km start Km end End-finish Length Average % Max % Surface
    Lippenhovestraat 0.8 2 104.6 1.2 cobbles
    Paddestraat 3.2 5.6 101 2.4 cobbles
    Molenberg 12 12.4 94.2 0.463 7 14.2 cobbles
    Kerkgate (Mater) 16.8 19.8 86.8 3 cobbles
    Wolvenberg 21.2 21.8 84.8 0.666 6.8 17.3 asphalt
    Kattenberg 22.5 23.8 82.8 1.3 cobbles
    Doorn 32.6 34.3 72.3 1.7 cobbles
    Huisepontweg 35.7 37.5 69.1 1.8 cobbles
    Varentstraat 50.9 52.9 53.7 2 cobbles
    Oude Kwaremont 56.7 58.9 47.7 2.2 4.2 11 cobbles
    Paterberg 62.4 62.8 43.8 0.4 12.5 20 cobbles
    Koppenberg 68.9 69.5 37.1 0.6 11.6 22 cobbles
    Mariaborrestraat 71.9 73.2 33.4 1.3 cobbles
    Steenbeekdries 72.5 73.2 33.4 0.7 5.3 6.7 cobbles
    Taaienberg 75.7 76.5 30.1 0.8 7.1 18 cobbles
    Berg ten Stene 80.6 81.9 24.7 1.3 5.2 9 asphalt
    Haaghoek 83.7 85.7 20.9 2 cobbles
    Leberg 85.7 86.7 19.9 0.95 4.2 13.8 asphalt
    Kauwenberg 89.6 90.8 15.8 1.2 3 3.6 asphalt
    Boigneberg 94.8 95.8 10.8 1.05 5.2 12.4 beton
    Eikenberg 99.4 100.5 6.1 1.2 5.8 10 cobbles
    Finish 106.6 106.6 0 asphalt
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  • « Last Edit: April 12, 2015, 10:29 by LukasCPH aka Fus87 »
    2017 0711|CYCLING PR Manager; 2016 Stölting Content Editor
    Views presented are my own.
    RIP Keith

    DB-Coop

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #62 on: April 12, 2015, 21:47 »
    new, better final.

    While I agree that your final is better balanced, and better for TV because it reuses less places, only a short stretch really. The real issue with classics is that they reuse the same route, they need to chance every year. Not saying it would be a totally different race, just saying take all the climbs put them in a bag and shuffle the order of which they come. The problem is same route makes the winning tactic very obvious, if it is a new route each team would have to scout and likely find different places to attack than the others. As is now it is basically hit it that last time around, just before BMC start to pull when it is too late as always. To be fair to the Ronde, something needs to be done about LBL a lot before this race. Last years LBL was perhaps the most boring race I have ever watched, and it was 100% on the people that made the course, only Pozzovivo tried something, and that failed.
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #63 on: April 12, 2015, 21:52 »
    The real issue with classics is that they reuse the same route, they need to chance every year.
    Oh, I have plenty of other options up my sleeve, all using different routes. :D
    It just takes some time to map them all. ;)
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  • DB-Coop

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #64 on: September 03, 2015, 18:02 »
    Long time since I have posted anything in here, and I have finished a second edition of Post Danmark Rundt so I figured I'd upload that one too in addition to the one in the 2nd post. (I'll upload all stage info over the next couple of days, so far I uploaded stages 1A and 4)

    Stage 1a: ITT Juulsø - Himmelbjerget (1150 meters)


    A super short "Mountain" prologue up Himmelbjerget at above 11%, on top of this only the first part of the days climb is paved, the rest is on relatively narrow dirt paths, no car support this stage, but considering the length of the stage, it isn't really needed, just a couple of guys with wheels on the climb. While MTT's are normally just a wattage exercise this is more of a uphill sprinting exercise. And a stage where being in shape, and warming up well can prove decisive. Worth noting is that it will take a bit of fixing to make this stage possible, but it shouldn't be too expensive. And really compared to the visuals it will provide, it is worth it.

    Sights:





    Himmelbjerget

    Stage 1b: Ry - Silkeborg

    Stage 2: Herning - Vejle (132km)


    The Traditional Vejle stage starts out in Herning the birth town of Bjarne Riis, The early part of the stage is quite flat, but features a bit of gravel roads though, with sections of the historical Hærvejen also ridden, the parcours however change as soon as the route hits Jelling shortly outside of Vejle from where several climbs make up a tough finale to the stage. Tackling climbs like Sleldevej and Højen Skov to reduce the size of the peloton before the hardest climb of the day Høgsholt comes with 22km's remaining. From here the route enters the valley of Grejsdalen where climbs of Gl. Hornstrupvej and Bøgeagervej, on opposide sides of the valley, comes in short succession. The valley takes the peloton into Vejle where the steep Gl. Kongevej awaits, however the climb is cut short as the route enters Uhrskovvej, which leads into a descent with a few switch backs, and a few hundred meters to sprint for the win in a downhill sprint on Jellingvej. Good climbers with good descending and a bit of a pop should be able to fare well on this stage.

    Sights:

    Herning

    Søby

    Harrild Hede

    Lindet Krat

    Givskud

    Jelling

    Højen Skov

    Grejsdalen
    Vejle (Finish)


    Stage 3: Ribe - Aabenraa

    Stage 4: Næstved - Lumsås (195km)


    Stage number five sees hilly races brought to Zealand, the west coast. With about 1600 meters of elevation on the day, the stage is quite tricky. Starting out in Næstved and running north through some of the most spectacular nature Zealand has to offer outside of Norhern Zealand the route passes through historically significant places such as Sorø as well. Later after passing through Kalundborg, several of the great hills of Odsherred are used as spring boards for attacks from afar. The quadruple threat of Kårupvej Ordrupvej, Svellebakken and Asnæs Indelukke are sure to cause splits. However any riders getting away will have to stay clear for 20 almost flat kilometers before seing the hills of Lumsås. Lumsås is located on the top of a hill between two fjords, and the final consists of a 5.1km loop from one fjord through Lumsås and down to the other and vica versa. The loop has two climbs and the finish is the third time the line is crossed.

    Sights:

    Næsved

    Herlufsholm boarding school

    Bavelse Sø

    Næsbyholm


    Sorø

    Vedbygaard

    Sæbygaard

    Watermill

    Kalundborg

    Kårupvej

    Lumsås

    Stage 5a: Holbæk - Frederiksberg

    Stage 5b: ITT Frederiksberg - Frederiksberg
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  • « Last Edit: September 05, 2015, 16:49 by DB-Coop »

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #65 on: September 03, 2015, 23:09 »
    Great thread, makes me want to go to Denmark :)


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #66 on: September 08, 2015, 01:02 »
    Stage 3: Ribe - Aabenraa

    Stage 4: Næstved - Lumsås (195km)
    How will the race caravan get from Aabenraa to Næstved?

    It's a pretty long transfer whichever way you go, via Germany, Fehmarn & Lolland-Falster or via the Great Belt.

    Unless the use the Fynshav-Bøjden ferry of course ... but wouldn't it then be better to have the stage finish in Sønderborg?
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  • DB-Coop

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #67 on: September 08, 2015, 08:07 »
    How will the race caravan get from Aabenraa to Næstved?

    It's a pretty long transfer whichever way you go, via Germany, Fehmarn & Lolland-Falster or via the Great Belt.

    Unless the use the Fynshav-Bøjden ferry of course ... but wouldn't it then be better to have the stage finish in Sønderborg?

    via Great belt (E45 to Kolding, E20 to Slagelse and Main 22 to Næstved), it is about a 2:30 transfer so pretty long, yet not unheard of. Fynshav Boyden only has very limited space for buses and trucks so not an option. Also stage need to finish in Aabenraa as this is where the gravel roads are in abundance and there is a rather long cobbled climb. Best way to shorten the transfer down would imo. be moving the next days stage start to Korsør or something shaving off 40 minutes or so. I think it can be done as is though.
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #68 on: September 08, 2015, 08:49 »
    via Great belt (E45 to Kolding, E20 to Slagelse and Main 22 to Næstved), it is about a 2:30 transfer so pretty long, yet not unheard of.
    That's a LONG transfer for Denmark. #astana weren't happy with the Vejle-Nyborg transfer this year; although with Fuglsang in the condition he was in, any transfer would have been uncomfortable and 'too long' for him - and #astana are rarely happy with anything.

    Gravel roads and cobbled climb! I like the sound of that! :cool
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  • DB-Coop

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #69 on: September 08, 2015, 09:26 »
    Gravel roads and cobbled climb! I like the sound of that! :cool

    In this edition stages 2-4 are where the gaps should present themselves, apart from on the TT's.

    Stage 1A Few seconds gaps between the GC riders
    Stage 1B Likely a sprint with most riders still there
    Stage 2 Likely a sprint from a very reduced group of 3-7 riders - With many riders close by
    Stage 3 Several riders eliminated from GC do to length stage and roughness of final - likely medium groups with larger gaps
    Stage 4 Toughest stage, top riders might finish one and one or in tiny groups
    Stage 5A Likely uphill sprint with half the peloton dropped
    Stage 5B An ITT in Denmark, well you know

    That stage 3 is a beast, start of by the west coast for wind, of cause this would not be enough, so I decided to have them ride on gravel roads for a lot of the stage. Some of the gravel are even along the west coast at the start of the stage, like the one below, a maintenance road for the flood dikes. 
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  • « Last Edit: September 08, 2015, 09:38 by DB-Coop »

    LukasCPH

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #70 on: September 08, 2015, 11:26 »
    DB-Coop for PDR race director! :cheer
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  • Not My Circus

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #71 on: September 08, 2015, 13:21 »
    #astana are rarely happy with anything.

    Well they don't have to come... Birdsong to be co-opted onto a special team consisting of outcast Danish riders..  :P
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  • Not My Circus

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #72 on: September 08, 2015, 13:22 »
    DB-Coop for PDR race director! :cheer

     :cool  EXCEPT for ITT last stage...I hate when a race finishes with an ITT ... Love the first uphill sprinty type one though
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  • DB-Coop

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #73 on: September 08, 2015, 14:18 »
    :cool  EXCEPT for ITT last stage...I hate when a race finishes with an ITT ... Love the first uphill sprinty type one though

    Thanks and RE: the ITT

    Really I didn't plan to have that from the beginning, but in the end I ended up having a short stage to Copenhagen allowing for a second ITT, which I would argue is probably needed. As far as late ITT it is almost always going to be like that given that Apart from western Zealand that island is so flat that any stages where time can be won will almost have to be in Jutland, hence why Zealand or Funen normally host the ITT on stage 4B. Stage 5 not being hard enough to change anything, finishing on Frederiksberg Allé means that from a race perspective it is the same. It is some what bad for TV I guess, with the least appealing stage last, or well the stage people might not watch, if people do that people miss the podium.

    However what is good about this configuration is what it does to the possibilities of stage 5A. The last stage 5B (ITT) is ending on Frederiksberg Allé as normal. However stage 5A does not end here, instead it tackles a circuit consisting of both Valby bakke (From the less steep side) and the cobbles up the "climb" at Ny Carlsbervej. Providing a stage finish where gaps may happen, with finish being a top Valby Bakke next to Frederiksberg Castle.
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  • DB-Coop

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #74 on: September 08, 2015, 14:24 »
    Well they don't have to come... Birdsong to be co-opted onto a special team consisting of outcast Danish riders..  :P

    Another reason why I am suggesting the 5 man squads, it will be easier for Danish riders to be given an opportunity for themselves in *dk - Say Fuglsangs asks to ride PDR, well now Astana have to find 7 other riders, in this way it would be well Fuglsang wants to ride, why not give him Gruzdev and de Vresse along with two neo pros to see what they can do. I think it makes it easier to get teams to go.
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #75 on: September 08, 2015, 15:30 »
    Another reason why I am suggesting the 5 man squads, it will be easier for Danish riders to be given an opportunity for themselves in *dk - Say Fuglsangs asks to ride PDR, well now Astana have to find 7 other riders, in this way it would be well Fuglsang wants to ride, why not give him Gruzdev and de Vresse along with two neo pros to see what they can do. I think it makes it easier to get teams to go.
    I fully agree. #astana Did in fact only bring 6 riders last year, and were down to 5 after Fuglsang crashed out. That may well have cost Lutsenko the overall win as the young Kazakh was flying in the final stage.

    5 riders is quite extreme - but I think that non-WT races should as a standard be limited to 6 riders. Exceptions could be made if well-argued for.
    They could even allow the "local" teams bigger teams of 8 to give more Conti riders a chance to ride, and compensate for the difference in abilities. It's done in San Luis.
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  • DB-Coop

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #76 on: September 09, 2015, 14:57 »
    I fully agree. #astana Did in fact only bring 6 riders last year, and were down to 5 after Fuglsang crashed out. That may well have cost Lutsenko the overall win as the young Kazakh was flying in the final stage.

    5 riders is quite extreme - but I think that non-WT races should as a standard be limited to 6 riders. Exceptions could be made if well-argued for.
    They could even allow the "local" teams bigger teams of 8 to give more Conti riders a chance to ride, and compensate for the difference in abilities. It's done in San Luis.

    I think organizers should be able to pick themselves, however I don't see why you'd want it above 6 for most races

    One of the great thing this year, and many years in PDR is that the racing is far more opportunistic than at say the Tour. What this comes down to is imo. that opportunistic riding is more likely to work. Now what makes opportunistic riding possible.

    Well the larger the gap between the skill of the stars and the doms of a race, the more likely opportunistic riding is to be successful. PDR being a good example. Note that this effect can also be achieved somewhat by reducing the amount of doms available to each captain.

    Basically I think you want teams and doms, to discourage riders unable to win to ride for someone else not on their team. Also you'd want some sort of stability. But again back to my point above about larger skill gap this is the reason why people argue womens cycling are a better watch as this is the case resulting in more opportunistic riding.

    As far as the conti teams goes, I think you'd simply see more teams, if you as a Race Director makes it clear that, as long as their is not 11 or something, you are going to invite all the danish conti teams, take last year, 3 teams are great and one knowing they might not make the number 1 goal of the season sort of stays away from too hard spending. If you made it clear you was handing out invites, then sponsors like Jutlander Bank would be likely to step into the conti scene I believe. Secondly you would spread the talents wider, no-one wants to be the 7th best guy on the best danish conti team as this would mean missing PDR, if you could be a top 2 guy on another team, likewise a rider now just seen as a 3rd man, a dom (And how good doms does conti teams need for these races?) might be a leader elsewhere. Also you get more teams that want the break, ie. more hectic start to stages, and if you have 8 danish conti teams, guess what you might see 6 or 7 riders in breaks many days, and guess what also, it will be harder to control this break as the GT teams only have 5 riders each.

    Five is what I see as a break-off point at five you can still defend a lead if need be, you can pull for the sprint, or you can do both if you have a great squad. Also I love the extremity of only having five riders as it makes your doms skill more important as well, your doms being good riders or pack filler will actually matter.
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  • DB-Coop

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #77 on: March 15, 2016, 16:19 »
    So another year another go at an interesting route from my part, my route is not done yet but so far I intend it to feature these elements:

    Stage 1 - Somewhere in the North likely starting in Skagen and finishing in either Hanstholm or Thisted, likely long going about the 220 mark and likely very dependent on wind, probably not the hardest of finals so likely a sprint though those not up for a long windy race could be out of GC, if not the race altogether.

    Stage 2 - Nykøbing (Mors) to Hammel 209 km I have this one drawn up already the stage will see many astonishing sights, Hjerl Hede, Dollerup Bakker, Tange Sø and Haurumdalen. The stage is quite flat to start off with but gets harder after Ulstrup. And the final is dominated by the hard climbs of Haurumdalen including a climb of the Pøt Mølle climb just two kilometers before the finishing line in front of the Frisenborg Catstle. This stage will likely see some gaps being created in the GC. The last 30 km has 400 meters of elevation!

    Stage 3 - Vejle stage  - I am thinking it will start in Aarhus and finish in Vejle and probably going coastal through Odder to get there, not sure what finish to use, I am thinking uphill but it could be either Kiddevej or Munkebjerg. Likely another GC impacting stage

    Stage 4a - Funen stage likely using climbs of south funen and probably ending in Nyborg for practical reasons. Maybe starting in Faaborg, will try to shove in climbs in the first eighty to compensate for a flat finish in the last 20. Likely featuring castles and the largest rock in Denmark - Damestenen.



    Stage 4b - ITT Korsør - Skælskør 18 km - Already have this one drawn up and it is a beauty, the 18 km ITT have part asphalt, part white gravel and part forest roads. There is a single climb, a short but steep climb partly on forest roads. Should be the deciding force in the race most likely.

    Stage 5 - Slagelse - Frederiksberg, probably a rather easy stage, should be a sprint. Finish approach will be Valbybakke from the less steep side, but all the way from the base, and from there the shortest way to Frederiksberg Alle, should be a sprint, but there is a chance of an attack, also not all sprinters will like this sort of finish at all.
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #78 on: October 03, 2016, 22:14 »
    It's that time of the year again.
    The road cycling season is (almost) over, and to get us through the dark and cold months, we turn to race-building.

    Tonight, I'm resurrecting a race that had a short, but memorable history: The San Francisco GP![1]

    Held only between 2001 and 2005, the race nevertheless has a decent enough palmarès:
    Year Winner Runner-up Third Place
    2001 *usa George Hincapie *ca Michael Barry *usa Trent Klasna
    2002 *ca Charles Dionne *au Henk Vogels *it Massimo Giunti
    2003 *usa Chris Horner *usa Mark McCormack *ru Vyacheslav Ekimov
    2004 *ca Charles Dionne *usa Fred Rodriguez *usa George Hincapie
    2005 *de Fabian Wegmann *usa John Lieswyn *usa Jason McCartney

    For the SFGP v2.0, we'll use the long circuit from the earlier race, 14.3 km including Fillmore Street and Taylor Street:
    http://www.cronoescalada.com/index.php/tracks/view/218094

    Here's the profile of the circuit. 164 metres of altitude gain per lap:

    For a HC or WT one-day race, they could do 15 laps for a 214.5 km race with 2460 altitude metres.
    A World Championship would have 18 laps or 257.4 km and 2952 altitude metres.

    All we need now is a committed sponsor and some locals to do the organisation, and we're good to go. :)
     1. yes, that's a link to the race website - delightfully old-school, but with all necessary information on the race
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  • « Last Edit: November 22, 2016, 13:25 by LukasCPH »

    LukasCPH

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #79 on: October 05, 2016, 10:10 »
    Alternatively, they could do an excursion across the Golden Gate Bridge for two laps of a Mount Tamalpais circuit to soften the legs first. Just to ensure there's no sprinter at the pointy end of the race in the final ... :D
    http://www.cronoescalada.com/index.php/tracks/view/218215

    Over 2000 altitude metres on 106.7 km:

    Afterwards, they can do a number of laps of the city circuit: 7 for a WT one-day race (206.8 km), 11 for a World Championship (264 km).
    This would push the total altitude metres to between 3100 and 3800. :o
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  • « Last Edit: November 22, 2016, 13:24 by LukasCPH »

    LukasCPH

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #80 on: November 14, 2016, 22:57 »
    Continuing my loose series of one-day race suggestions is a circuit in *uk Bristol.
    Inspired by this year's Tour of Britain stage, I thought "how can we make this harder?"

    http://www.cronoescalada.com/index.php/tracks/view/234850
    By cutting out the flat back-and-forth stretch on the banks of the River Avon and replacing it with a visit to the University quarter and southern Clifton, I turned the Tour of Britain's 15 km, 230 altitude metre circuit into 17.4 km with 245 altitude metres:


    For a one-day race "Bristol GP", 10 laps (2450 altitude metres) will do, for a 174 km race.
    If Bristol were to be awarded the World Championships[1], I'd let the men's elite do 17 laps for a total of 261 km and 3675 altitude metres.
     1. Yorkshire 2019 in mind, probably not going to happen for another 15 years at least
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  • « Last Edit: November 22, 2016, 13:21 by LukasCPH »

    LukasCPH

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #81 on: November 14, 2016, 23:18 »
    And while I was at it, I also mapped out a possible Worlds circuit in *il Jerusalem.

    To avoid political upheaval, I've stayed away from the Old City and East Jerusalem, instead going to the city's western outskirts. It's still political enough, mind - but the sort of politics that nobody in their right mind could protest against:
    The start/finish area is at Yad Vashem.

    http://www.cronoescalada.com/index.php/tracks/view/235381
    From there, the route descends into the valley of the Nahal Sorek stream before climbing to the suburb of Mevaseret Zion, 3.2 km at 4.3%. A flattish section is followed by another descent to the Nahal Sorek valley. The second climb of the circuit is through En Kerem, 3.7 km at 7.2%. The last kilometre of the 22.6 km circuit with 473 altitude metres is very slightly downhill:


    12 laps will give a total length of 271.2 km and 5676 altitude metres. Did anybody say "climbers' Worlds"? :D
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  • « Last Edit: November 22, 2016, 13:20 by LukasCPH »

    LukasCPH

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #82 on: February 01, 2017, 21:27 »
    Over the years, DB-Coop has filled this thread with varied stages for the Tour of Denmark.

    Just after Christmas, I started bouncing the idea of a 3-week Scandinavian Grand Tour around on Twitter - and it was very well-received.
    Things went from there, and now I have a full first edition of such a race, to be held in June. And yes, there will be stages under the midnight sun (or close enough)!
    I know that having a fourth GT is rather illusional, but this is just meant to be a bit of fun ... and show some new ideas and concepts that we might see in a real race one day.


    So, without further ado, let me introduce the

    ScandiGT


    Sponsors & Jerseys
    As you can see in the logo, the main partner will be *se *dk postal company PostNord, already well-known in cycling circles from the Tour of Denmark and as co-sponsor of Swedish Conti team #treberg Tre Berg-PostNord, who will also sponsor the overall leader's jersey:

    Rules for GC are the usual ones; bonus seconds are handed out at bonus sprints (-3", -2", -1") and all stage finishes except TTs (-10", -6", -4").


    For the points jersey we've secured the partnership of *dk pharmaceutical Novo Nordisk, another company that is already sponsoring cycling in the form of ProConti #novonordisk Team Novo Nordisk and the hills jersey at the Tour of Denmark:

    Points for the points classification will be awarded at every stage finish (except a possible TTT) and at 3 bonus sprints on every stage. The exact breakdown follows further down.


    The mountain jersey is, almost logically, sponsored by a *no company: Uno-X are the main sponsor of the Tour of Norway and Norwegian Conti #unox Uno-X Hydrogen Development Team. Their self-service petrol stations are spread across Norway and Denmark.

    There will be mountain sprints on most stages, with the categorisation ranging from HC (30 points) to Cat. 4 (3 points) - you can see the exact breakdown lower in this post.


    The fourth classification jersey uses a novel approach: Instead of giving a jersey to the youth classification, combination classification, best Scandinavian or whatnot, we've decided to award activity during the stages, and with a very colourful jersey sponsored by *no *se *dk SAS Scandinavian Airlines (who will be of great value to the race for some planned plane transfers):

    The first riders at every bonus sprint, mountain sprint, stage finish and a number of additional so-called 'activity sprints' will receive 'activity points' (3, 2, 1 points for the top-3), and the rider with the most 'activity points' gets to wear this jersey that unites the colours of all three home countries of the ScandiGT.


    Since this is a fantasy exercise, we'll pretend that the UCI's limit on four classification jerseys for high-category races has been softened by the time the race gets put together ... so there's a youth (U23) classification as well, sponsored by Nordea, headquartered in *se but with operations in *dk *no and several other countries, and one of the several dozen smaller sponsors of #bornholm BHS-Almeborg Bornholm, so not completely foreign to cycling either:



    We don't want to push our luck with the UCI too far, though, so we cap the number of leader's jersey at six. Well, six that are awarded at the same time[1]:
    Each ScandiGT home country will have its own jersey for "best rider on Danish/Swedish/Norwegian roads". The classification is quite simple: The times for each stage (or part of a stage) ridden in that country are added together, incl. possible bonus seconds, and the rider with the lowest time gets the jersey. The *dk and *se jerseys are also sponsored by PostNord, the *no jersey by Uno-X:



    Points scales for points, mountain & activity jerseys
    Spoiler (hover to show)


    First edition
    Since lots of things have to be put together, the first edition of the ScandiGT isn't planned until 2020 - which gives us the opportunity to use that first edition as a commemoration. I'll present the 2020 ScandiGT over the next days and weeks.
     1. at least in the inaugural edition - this may no longer be the case in later editions
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  • « Last Edit: February 02, 2017, 10:13 by LukasCPH »

    LukasCPH

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #83 on: February 01, 2017, 22:04 »

    2020 ScandiGT


    Sydslesvig Grand Départ
    In 1920, following World War 1, plebiscites were held in the northern parts of what was then the Prussian province of Schleswig-Holstein (itself only Prussian since 1864, after Denmark lost the so-called Second Schleswig War). The majority in zone 1 voted for Denmark, and the area was thus transferred back to Denmark after 56 years of German rule.

    Nevertheless, this left minorities on both sides of the border: A German minority in Denmark as well as a Danish minority in Germany. After World War 2, the Danish and German governments signed the Bonn-Copenhagen declarations in 1955, guaranteeing the existence and equal treatment of minorities. Over the more than 60 years that have passed since, the area has become a model for the peaceful coexistence of cultural minorities across the world.

    It's no secret that yours truly grew up as part of that Danish minority, so having a cycling race honour the region I call home has long been a dream of mine.
    By starting the ScandiGT in Schleswig-Holstein 100 years after the plebiscites, visiting many places connected to the history of the area, especially the First and Second Schleswig Wars, the plebiscite & reunification of Sønderjylland, and the Danish minority in Germany, we'll commemorate the sometimes violent past, the peaceful and cooperative present and the (hopefully) bright future of the Danish-German border region.
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #84 on: February 03, 2017, 20:19 »
    5 June 2020: Team presentation
    Schleswig, Schloss Gottorf
    The team presentation would take place on the eve of stage 1 in Schleswig/Slesvig[1], the old capital of what used to be the duchy of Schleswig. More specifically, on the open area on the Schloßinsel/Slotsøen in front of Schloss Gottorf/Gottorp Slot:
    First mentioned in 1161 as a stronghold of the Schleswig bishops, it became Danish in 1460, and in 1544 became the residence of the dukes of Schleswig-Holstein-Gottorf (a cadet branch of the Danish royal house) until they lost their Schleswig possessions in 1713, during the Great Northern War. The Gottorf dukes renovated and re-built the castle several times; the current look is the result of the last big building project around 1700 when the baroque southern wing was built.

    Demoted to being only the residence of the Danish governors of Schleswig in the 18th and 19th centuries, the castle was turned into a barracks during the First Schleswig War and continued as such until after World War 2. Today it houses the Schleswig-Holsteinische Landesmuseen, the state's main museum for art (from the Middle Ages to the 20th century) and archaeology (incl. two bog bodies and the Nydam boat, a sea-going rowing ship from the 4th century that was a precursor to the famous Viking ships).

    EDIT: As a special event, there will be a sprint challenge in conjunction with the team presentation; see a few posts further down for the details. :)
     1. For places in what is today Germany, I will name the German toponym first, followed by the Danish one, on the first occasion the place is mentioned. Afterwards, I will use only the German name.
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  • « Last Edit: February 04, 2017, 22:41 by LukasCPH »

    LukasCPH

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #85 on: February 03, 2017, 20:49 »
    6 June 2020: Stage 1
    Schleswig - Haithabu/Hedeby - Schleswig ITT, 10.9 km
    Starting in front of Schloss Gottorf where the team presentation was held the day before, this short ITT (too long to be called a prologue, though) takes riders to the old Viking site of Haithabu and then back to the city of Schleswig:


    The 10.9 km course includes 1400 m of gravel road plus 250 m of cobbles.

    The first 4 km aren't particularly challenging; but after 2.4 km the following vehicles will be diverted since the gravel road inside the Haithabu ramparts is too narrow to be used by cars. So teams will have to place staff with wheels & spare bikes along a 2.5 km stretch to take care of possible mechanicals. There will be plenty of neutral support on motorbikes as well.
    After 4 km, the asphalt turns into gravel, soon after the riders pass through the southern entrance into Haithabu and ride through the former Viking trade port. After crossing the rampart at the northern gate, they're reunited with their team car, and the intermediate time is taken at the Wikinger Museum Haithabu after 5.4 km.
    Passing the Romanesque church of Haddeby (which may or may not be built on the site of the first Christian church in Scandinavia), it is now possible to gaze across the Schlei/Slien and see the city of Schleswig on the other bank, with the cathedral towering over the old city.
    The next four km are again relatively easy; first on the same road as at the start of the course, then along the banks of the Schlei towards the city centre.
    Having passed the Domschule (founded in 1307) just before the flamme rouge, the riders turn right at the end of the Königstraße towards the cathedral, then turn left onto the cobbled Süderdomstraße for the last 250 m before they finish on the Rathausmarkt.
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  • Leadbelly

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #86 on: February 04, 2017, 22:29 »
    I had an idea to improve team presentations.

    Run it concurrently and in the vicinity of a sprint challenge. Same idea as the old Quebec version - team selects a rider and those riders face off in heats, a semi and a final. Have a couple of teams presented inbetween each heat and then show the sprint up on the big screen.

    The winner gets to wear the leader's jersey on stage 1.

    Obviously you wouldn't want it at every event, but one or two races through the year could make it their "thing" and have it as an extra attraction.
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #87 on: February 04, 2017, 22:40 »
    I had an idea to improve team presentations.

    Run it concurrently and in the vicinity of a sprint challenge. Same idea as the old Quebec version - team selects a rider and those riders face off in heats, a semi and a final. Have a couple of teams presented inbetween each heat and then show the sprint up on the big screen.

    The winner gets to wear the leader's jersey on stage 1.

    Obviously you wouldn't want it at every event, but one or two races through the year could make it their "thing" and have it as an extra attraction.
    This is an excellent idea! :cool

    In fact, we'll implement it for the 2020 ScandiGT already, with a 1.2 km course starting across the dam from Schloss Gottorf and finishing at the Domschule:

    Something we hadn't touched on before at all: The ScandiGT will be run with 8 riders per team, and will invite 24 teams. One rider of each team enters the Sprint Challenge.
    The first round will have 8 heats à 3 riders, then there's a quarterfinal round with 2 riders per heat, same for the semi-finals and final.
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  • « Last Edit: February 10, 2017, 16:41 by LukasCPH »

    DJW

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    Re: The Perfect Race
    « Reply #88 on: May 02, 2017, 04:28 »
    Whenever I'm in Lima I always think they could make use of this in a bike race, perhaps as part of a city circuit on the final day of a stage race.



    ~830m long, average gradient 6.3% with a max gradient of 19%, and as you can hopefully see it's cobbled too (although only from about a third of the way up).

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