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Chloe Hosking

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Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
« Reply #30 on: July 02, 2014, 19:51 »
Ok the Darkside question

Doping in the womens peloton

I know you read the stuff about the US cycling in the 80´s - 90´s and Reports are Nicole Cooke is in her book talking fridges full .

Are there rumors about ( unnamed of course ) riders or teams crossing the line?

why do you think there has been less positives in womens racing?

This is such a taboo subject in cycling and sport in general.

I did actually read that article about Inga and I was gobsmacked. I honestly had no idea.

I think the bottom line is there isn’t as much money in women’s cycling so there is less incentive to dope. But as that starts to change we need to make sure that the anti doping processes keep up. If we can win as much as the men at races like la Course or The Women’s Tour we should be under just as much scrutiny.

I’m not saying we don’t get drug tested, we do. But I think as the incentives increase so should how much we get tested.

I’m not going to comment on anyone else because I don’t want to get sued. The only thing I can say is this is my stance on doping; I don’t do it because it’s cheating.
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  • « Last Edit: July 02, 2014, 20:45 by L'arri »

    Chloe Hosking

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #31 on: July 02, 2014, 19:54 »
    Have you signed up for Bingo?

    No, but it's on my list of things to do as well as submit my fantasy tour de france team to the le tipping competition.
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  • « Last Edit: July 02, 2014, 20:46 by L'arri »

    Slow Rider

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #32 on: July 02, 2014, 19:58 »
    And a question from 42x16ss:

    During Charlie Walsh's time as head of cycling at the AIS there were a lot of issues in terms of "selected" rider development, where certain athletes were obviously favored over others in the system. This seems to have happened almost arbitrarily with some superior athetes being almost squeezed out while other - arguably inferior - athletes were given much better support and even preferential treatment.

    Is this something that you were exposed to during your development and is this something unique AIS or have you heard of similar issues in high performance programs overseas?
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  • Chloe Hosking

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #33 on: July 02, 2014, 20:00 »
    As a Member of HTC do you think that team shutting down was a big step backwards for the sport?

    Not really. In terms of women’s cycling Kristy S. was able to keep them women’s team going under Specialized Lululemon and I actually think that was a big deal because it showed a women’s team can stand on it’s own.

    Cycling is such a hard sport sponsor wise because sponsors only stay two or three years, that’s when they get the most bang for their buck. So it’s a constantly evolving thing.

    Is Vos being so good good or Bad for the future ?

    I can’t go and speak bad about Vos. She’s hard to beat sure, she has an incredible team also, but she’s not unbeatable. I think if anything her being so damn good motivates the rest of us. Last year there were many five girls that could win a world cup (I know they didn’t but the point is they were in contention for it) now I think there are 15. The depth and strength of the peloton is just getting stronger and stronger and we’re catching up to Vos.
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  • « Last Edit: July 02, 2014, 20:51 by L'arri »

    Leadbelly

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #34 on: July 02, 2014, 20:01 »
    One final one from me (before the server explodes  :D).

    Some nameless members of this forum have described the appeal of the Commonwealth Games as non-existant. What does the upcoming race mean to you? and what are your chances of winning?
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  • Zam

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #35 on: July 02, 2014, 20:03 »
    One final one from me (before the server explodes  :D).

    Some nameless members of this forum have described the appeal of the Commonwealth Games as non-existant. What does the upcoming race mean to you? and what are your chances of winning?

    ll_grillo?
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  • Chloe Hosking

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #36 on: July 02, 2014, 20:05 »
    We've had some questions on how the UCI can promote women’s cycling, and what broadcasters should be doing. But what can we, as the fans, do? How can we help make the women's side of the sport bigger?

    You’re already doing it. You’re showing that there is a viable market there for sponsors. People who want to watch women’s cycling, who are interested in it. Keep retweeting, keep giving women’s cycling news content hits on sites like cyclingtips, cyclingnews, podium cafe. The more people who show interest the bigger feet we have to stand on when we demand change. 
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  • « Last Edit: July 02, 2014, 20:50 by L'arri »

    just some guy

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #37 on: July 02, 2014, 20:05 »
    Final question

    1st thanks Chloe or 1st Q&A session , you have been brilliant, we may have blown up the sever, thanks so much for your time and @velorooms will be giving you that little bit of power and make that gap open up for at the Giro.

    Good luck to the rest of the team as well and for the rest of the season

    it was randon :lol

    and this maybe the best until last

    We always ask for a Explosion of Body fluids story, it can be about a " friend " of course.

    But in a race that ok I must stop know, opps that was not how I planned it
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  • Of course, if this turns out someday to be the industry standard integrated handlebar-computer-braking solution then I'll eat my kevlar-reinforced aerodynamic hat.

    Larri Nov 12, 2014

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #38 on: July 02, 2014, 20:11 »

    and this maybe the best until last

    We always ask for a Explosion of Body fluids story, it can be about a " friend " of course.

    But in a race that ok I must stop know, opps that was not how I planned it

    To explain this a bit, asking this is a bit of a tradition on VR, from this thread: the expulsion of bodily fluids cycling stories thread. Note to JSG, expulsion is not explosion. It can be actually, that would be quite a story, but it doesn't have to be ;)
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  • Chloe Hosking

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #39 on: July 02, 2014, 20:11 »
    During Charlie Walsh's time as head of cycling at the AIS there were a lot of issues in terms of "selected" rider development, where certain athletes were obviously favored over others in the system. This seems to have happened almost arbitrarily with some superior athetes being almost squeezed out while other - arguably inferior - athletes were given much better support and even preferential treatment.

    Is this something that you were exposed to during your development and is this something unique AIS or have you heard of similar issues in high performance programs overseas?

    This was actually something raised in the Inga article as well, about how there where ‘chosen ones’ and if you weren’t one, well good luck. So that was the American cycling federation.

    It does honestly happen everywhere.

    To be honest, I’ve navigated my cycling career largely outside of the Australian program. When I was 18 I sat down with the Australian national coach and asked, ‘What can I do to get selected in the Australian team?’ He basically said they just weren’t interested.

    I went to Europe myself and signed with HTC the next year. I wouldn’t change anything about the way I got to where I am.

    I think a lot of the time institutes look for specific type of athletes, generally really, really good hill climbers or really, really good TTers and a lot of the time sprinters get a bit left out. We generally take longer to develop things like hill climbing so we’re not as popular, and we’re opinionated. But as my Dad always said to me, ‘sprinters win more races.’
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  • « Last Edit: July 02, 2014, 20:46 by L'arri »

    Chloe Hosking

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #40 on: July 02, 2014, 20:19 »
    One final one from me (before the server explodes  :D).

    Some nameless members of this forum have described the appeal of the Commonwealth Games as non-existant. What does the upcoming race mean to you? and what are your chances of winning?

    Yeah, look I wrote a blog for cyclingtips about being selected etc etc. and there were a few comments where I just was like, ‘what?’

    There are a few different aspects to the Commonwealth Games.

    Maybe it’s not the biggest thing in the cycling world, and maybe some hard core men’s cycling fans would also argue that the Olympic’s doesn’t matter either.

    But the Commonwealth Games are huge deals for Commonwealth countries. A gold medal at the Commonwealth Games has monetary value for sponsors back home in Australia. Are these people who say it doesn’t matter going to pay my rent in Girona? Probably not.

    Also, I think winning a medal for your country in any event is a big deal. And certainly when I stood on the podium in Delhi with my bronze medal it felt like a pretty big deal. I wonder how many medals these critics have won for their country at the elite level of sport.

    And lastly, what a lot of people don’t know is that the Australian government has a grant system directly related to major games - not world championships. If you are in contention for major games you can be eligible for grants from the government. It’s a huge help to female cyclists, and we want to show we were worth that investment.
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  • « Last Edit: July 02, 2014, 20:47 by L'arri »

    Leadbelly

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #41 on: July 02, 2014, 20:22 »
    (it was Slow Rider who was dissing the Commonwealth Games)  :D
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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #42 on: July 02, 2014, 20:23 »
    (it was Slow Rider who was dissing the Commonwealth Games)  :D

    to be fair he is Dutch
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  • Chloe Hosking

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #43 on: July 02, 2014, 20:24 »
    We always ask for a Explosion of Body fluids story, it can be about a " friend " of course.

    But in a race that ok I must stop know, opps that was not how I planned it

    Oh goodness.

    Well this one actually is about a friend.

    We were at the Lotto Belisol tour last year and about 40km into the race she comes to me and she’s like, ‘oh my god I think I’m going to sh*t my pants’.

    ‘Oh,’ was all I could respond before managing, ‘what do you want to do?’

    ‘I don’t know, I don’t know...’

    We rode another 15 of so kilometres before she had to stop. She literally pulled off into the bush dumped her bike and went to the toilet. I thought no way was she going to get back into the peloton we were going so fast and there were so many attacks but then at the end of the race there she was, made it back.

    Poor girl. Worst feeling ever.
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  • « Last Edit: July 02, 2014, 20:48 by L'arri »

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #44 on: July 02, 2014, 20:44 »
    And that rounds off our Q&A. We hope you have enjoyed it as much as we have!

    Sorry for those who asked questions that did not get answered here. Chloe has been typing for almost two hours straight, so she deserves a rest. Most questions did get an answer though, which is great.

    Thanks to all those involved. First and foremost, of course, Chloe Hosking for doing this. Some very interesting answers, which were great to read - even though I got well burned on my ignorance on the Commonwealth Games ;)

    Thanks also to JSG for doing most of the work setting this whole thing up, getting in touch with Chloe, and managing the questions. Also thanks to Dim, Froome19 and Larri to help behind the scenes. Also a word to the good people of Velofocus, who will have a great article to publish once all this is compiled.

    But perhaps most importantly: Thanks to all who asked questions, voiced their support, or even just read along. It has been a great success - so much so that we very nearly crashed the servers.

    We are trying to line up more of these Q&A sessions, hopefully sooner rather than later we'll have a big announcement on that.

    In the meantime, don't forget to support Chloe during the Giro Rosa! You can follow her on twitter @chloe_hosking, her personal website, and all results during the Giro of course on our very own Velorooms Giro Rosa thread - never miss a chance for some good self-promotion ;)

    Thanks again everyone, and feel free to use this thread to discuss the Q&A further!
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  • Jamsque

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #45 on: July 03, 2014, 20:23 »
    Wow, great stuff. Thanks Chloe for coming to talk to us and thanks Slow Rider for organising.
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  • Slow Rider

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #46 on: July 04, 2014, 20:14 »
    The following is the article based on this interview that will appear on Velofocus. We will post the link here once it appears. But until then, here's the raw text ;)


    Chloe Hosking is one of the big sprinters in this year’s Giro Rosa. Her impressive résumé includes stages in the Tour of Qatar, Route de France and Holland Ladies Tour as well as overall victories in the Tour of Chongming Island and the Drentse 8 van Dwingeloo.

    At the Giro Rosa, Chloe will target the sprints and help her Hitec Products teammate Elisa Longo Borghini on general classification. Before the race gets underway, Chloe answers questions from members of Velorooms.com, a leading fan discussion website. These questions were submitted either via Twitter or over the forum. Chloe sat down to provide answers during a 90-minute session.

    Velorooms.com: Thanks for joining us, Chloe! Which stages are your targets in this year's Giro Rosa?

    Chloe Hosking: The first few stages are in the South. These should be good for the sprinters, Stages 2 and 3 in particular.

    VR: Who do you think will win this Giro?

    CH: My teammate Elisa Longo Borghini! But seriously, I think she can do a top three. With Mara Abbott in the race, I think it’s not great news for the other GC contenders that there are three hill top finishes!

    VR: When climbing behind someone like Mara, what goes through your mind?


    CH: Please let me survive! Why did I eat that gelato?

    Catching up with Vos

    VR: Another of the big GC favourites is Marianne Vos. Do you think her dominance is good or bad for the future of women’s cycling?


    CH: I can’t speak ill of Vos. She’s hard to beat for sure and she has an incredible team, but she’s not unbeatable. If anything, her being so damned good motivates the rest of us, I think. Last year, there were about five girls in contention for a World Cup race. Now I think there are fifteen. The strength and depth of the peloton is increasing all the time. We’re catching up with Vos.

    VR: Coming back to the sprints then, you’re often up against Kirsten Wild, who is much bigger than you. How do you plan your sprints against her and how do your teammates get involved?


    CH: Yes, those are two extremes: I’m extremely short and Wild is quite tall! It's a great example of why cycling is such a fantastic sport: there's no specific shape you have to be. Before cycling I was a rock climber but I had to stop when I could no longer reach as far as other girls my age.

    Like Vos, Wild is hard to beat but I've shown on a few occasions that it can be done. She has a fantastic leadout train so if you're forced to come from her wheel, she's not so easy to get around. But you can catch her by surprise or force her to go early.

    Fire in the eyes


    VR: Is there a lot of aggression and physical contact in the sprints? One of our members seemed surprised at the swearing he heard while watching a race on the roadside.

    CH: Riders are very different people on the bike compared to off the bike. If you've seen the recent bike-mounted videos of sprints at the Tour de Suisse, that gives you some idea of how bossy and vocal riders can be. You have to be that way. You can’t just say, “no problem, you can have that wheel.” If you do that, you'll wind up at the back of the peloton and never contend for the win.

    As for swearing, would you have cared if it came out of a man’s mouth? We’re competitive athletes, we experience adrenaline rushes and when you’re in the heat of the moment it’s like you have fire in your eyes. You’ll do anything and say anything to stay upright.

    About tolerance among men compared to the women’s peloton, I wouldn’t know to be honest; I’ve never sprinted against Cavendish! I can tell you that women are aggressive. I'm a very vocal rider myself. I’m always yelling out left or right, or stay there. Whether people choose to listen to me, that’s up to them.

    VR: How tired are you after a Grand Tour like the Giro Rosa?

    CH: I only finished one of the three Giros I started and I wasn’t that tired right after the race. But you have to be so careful because it’s so easy not to feel tired, do too much and then drive yourself into a hole for the next two months!

    The Commonwealth appeal

    VR: The Giro Rosa and the Thüringen Rundfahrt are running head-to-head in the race calendar. With opportunities for sprinters drying up long before the Giro Rosa is over, do you think sprinters might leave the Giro early to race Thüringen?


    CH: That’s something I hadn’t thought about. If I start a race, I intend to finish it and I hope that goes for the Giro this year. I think most riders will have picked one or the other. It’s a shame to have been forced to do that because they are both great races. There are a lot of moments where I shake my head at the current racing calendar and the overlap of Giro and Thüringen is one of them.

    VR: After the Giro, one of your upcoming dates is the Commonwealth Games Road Race. Some have questioned its appeal. Having won a bronze medal in the event in 2010, what does it mean to you?

    CH: Yeah, I wrote a blog for Cyclingtips about being selected and there were a few comments where I just was like, ‘what?’

    Maybe it’s not the biggest event in cycling and maybe some hardcore men’s cycling fans would also argue that the Olympics don’t matter either. But the Commonwealth Games are a big deal for Commonwealth countries. A gold medal at the Commonwealth Games has monetary value for sponsors back home in Australia. Are these naysayers going to pay my rent in Girona? Probably not.

    Also, I think winning a medal for your country in any event is a big deal. When I stood on the podium in Delhi with my bronze medal it felt like a pretty big deal to me. I wonder how many medals these critics have won for their country at the élite level of sport...

    What a lot of people don’t know is that the Australian government runs a grant system directly related to major Games rather than World Championships. If you're in contention for the Games, you could be eligible for grants from the government. That’s a huge boost for female cyclists and we want to show we're worth that investment.

    No longer second class citizens

    VR: Something different then. You’ve been vocal in the past about moving the sport forward. Have you noticed any changes now that Brian Cookson is president of the UCI? What role do you think the UCI president should take in driving the women's sport forward?

    CH: There have been huge improvements for women’s cycling in the past six to eight months since the whole UCI was overhauled. Brian Cookson has done a lot to bring women’s cycling into the 21st century. The appointment of fellow Aussie and former professional Tracey Gaudry [to the UCI Management Committee - ed.] has also had a huge impact.

    Look at the launch of La Course by the Tour de France, the Women’s Commission, the commitment of the UCI to create highlight packages of our World Cup races. These are big steps in the right direction.

    Under the old regime it really felt like we were second class citizens. It is the UCI’s job to support, manage and promote all aspects of the sport, not just men’s road cycling. Women’s cycling is not the only neglected area of the sport for many years but that's where my heart is, of course, so that’s what I focus on.

    VR: What do you think needs to happen to help grow women’s cycling?

    CH: This is such a huge question and a hard one to answer. There are so many different aspects to it. Firstly, teams and riders need to help themselves. Actively engage on social media, create content, interaction and demand for information. There should be more media coverage so more interaction can help with that. A lot of websites, newspapers and magazines can’t afford to send staff to every race, so we can give them the information that makes a huge difference. More television time to attract sponsors would also help.

    What we can do


    VR: So how do you feel about situations like the Tour of Flanders, where the men and women race on the same day with the entire available infrastructure, yet they still don’t broadcast the women’s race live?

    CH: Look, I think it’s ridiculous but I don’t know the fine details of it. I assume money is the major factor. So we’re back to creating demand and interest in the sport.

    VR: Did the women's peloton notice any difference in races which did get coverage, such as the Women’s Tour in Britain?

    CH: Absolutely. Public support was huge and you could see it with the crowds coming out every day. I read somewhere that the host towns broke even or better. I think this shows that, with plenty of media coverage, women’s cycling is just as much of a drawcard as men’s cycling.

    VR: So we had questions on what the UCI should do to promote the sport, what teams should do, even broadcasters. What can we do as fans to help?

    CH: You’re already doing it. You’re showing that there's a viable market for sponsors. People who want to watch women’s cycling, who are interested in it. Keep retweeting and giving women’s cycling content hits on sites like Velorooms, Cyclingtips, Cyclingnews and Podium Cafe. The more people who show interest, the bigger feet we have to stand on when we demand change.

    Doping & favouritism: the dark side

    VR: Cycling also has a darker side to contend with. Did you read the recent Inga Thompson interview on doping in the sport? Do you think there's much doping in the women’s side of the sport?

    CH: This is such a taboo subject in cycling and sport in general. I did read that article about Inga and I was gobsmacked. I honestly had no idea.

    I think the bottom line is that there isn’t as much money in women’s cycling, so there's less incentive to dope. But as that starts to change we need to make sure that the anti-doping processes keep pace.

    If we can win as much as the men at races like La Course or The Women’s Tour, we should be under just as much scrutiny. I’m not saying we don’t get drug tested, we do. But I think as the incentives increase so should how much we get tested.

    I’m not going to comment on anyone else because I don’t want to get sued. The only thing I can offer is my own stance on doping: I don’t do it because it’s cheating.

    VR: During Charlie Walsh’s time as head of cycling at the AIS, there were a lot of issues with ‘selected’ rider development, in which certain athletes were obviously favoured over others. Have you encountered this during your career and do you think it also happens in other federations?

    CH: That was also raised in the Inga article, about how there were ‘chosen ones’ and if you weren’t one, well good luck. That was in the American cycling federation but it happens everywhere.

    I’ve navigated my cycling career largely outside of the Australian program. When I was eighteen, I sat down with the Australian national coach and asked, "What can I do to get selected in the Australian team?" His basic reply was that they just weren’t interested. So I went to Europe myself and signed with HTC the next year. I wouldn’t change anything about how I got where I am.

    I think a lot of the time, institutes look for a specific type of athlete, generally really good hill climbers or really good time-triallists, and sprinters get a bit left out. We take longer to develop our climbing abilities so we’re not as popular and of course we’re opinionated. But like my Dad always said to me, ‘sprinters win more races.’

    The girl with the bananas


    VR: Finally, some less serious questions. What was the strangest trophy or prize you have ever won at a race?

    CH: Good question. I don’t know. I won a washing machine for the young rider classification at the Holland Ladies Tour in 2011. I thought that was pretty funny: do you want me to be a housewife or a bike rider?

    VR: Which do you prefer, cats or dogs?

    CH: I’m a dog lady! Don’t you follow me on Instagram?

    VR: Do you have a nickname in the peloton?

    CH: As far as I know, I'm just known as Chloe, but you never know. I know Judith Arndt and the Columbia-Highroad team used to refer to me as ‘the girl with the bananas’ during the 2009 Giro because I always had bananas in my pocket. We had a good laugh when I signed for the team the following year... Didn’t stop me from eating my bananas though.

    VR: And now our final question. We’re sorry to have to ask but it's something of a tradition for Velorooms interviews: do you have any stories for our ‘Expulsion of bodily fluids stories’ thread?

    CH: Oh, goodness. Well this one is actually about a friend.

    We were at the Lotto-Belisol Belgium Tour last year and about 40km into the race she comes to me and she’s like, “Oh my God I think I’m going to sh*t my pants.”

    “Oh,” was all I could respond before asking, “So what do you want to do?”

    “I don’t know, I don’t know...”

    We rode another fifteen so kilometres before she just had to stop. She literally pulled off into the bush, dumped her bike and went to the toilet. I thought no way was she going to get back into the peloton - we were going so fast and there were so many attacks - but then at the end of the race there she was there. She made it back.

    Poor girl. Worst feeling ever.

    VR: Thank you very much for your time Chloe, and best of luck during the Giro!

    You can follow Chloe Hosking during the Giro Rosa on Twitter @chloe_hosking and on her blog at chloehosking.wordpress.com.

    Velorooms’ next Q&A session is already being prepared. Stay tuned to Velorooms.com for announcements and your chance to ask questions of other pro cycling figures!

    Questions were submitted by Velorooms’ forum members Jamsque, Froome19, Havetts, KeithJamesMC, L’Arri, Dim, 42x16ss, Sean, AG, LD, Fus87, Leadbelly, Zam, Flo, Krabkakes, Just Some Guy, and Slow Rider. Some further questions came over Twitter from @Campy007, @brakingthelimit, and @megster. Thanks to all those who contributed!

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  • Slow Rider

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #47 on: July 09, 2014, 09:55 »
    The article as published by Velofocus:

    http://velofocus.com/2014/chloe-hosking-qa/
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  • Tuart

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #48 on: July 09, 2014, 10:01 »
    Oh wow, just seen this thread.

    Full of win. Great stuff!  :cool
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  • 2014 Velorooms Giro d'Italia Velogames Winner

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    Re: Chloe Hosking Q&A - 2 July 2014
    « Reply #49 on: July 09, 2014, 10:20 »
    What Tuarts said. Word for word.
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