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Sauna in Duvel

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On which side..?
« on: November 18, 2014, 00:07 »
On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?

Hello :)

I have for a long time, wanted to build my own Frame. I am a bit magnetised to older steel road bikes and latterly, mountain bikes. When I was a kid of about 14 years I went to a Bike Shop in Brighton, which, unlike many, was not a big storefront with well lit, off the peg bikes. It was a business called Rigden cycles. Up a staircase, on a slightly run-down bit of Central Brighton, was a man called Les Rigden, who was a frame builder.

Whether it was a quiet day or just because he was a patient man proud of his work, he showed me around the workshop, the tools and the bikes he was making. He had a nice photo album of the bikes he had done in the past - this was the time when Low Profile steel frames were becoming popular and he had his own take on how they could be made. In short, it was pretty interesting and I was mad on bikes so I can't remember who bored who 1st, but it took a few hours. He was also pretty damn good at it whilst he retired from building bikes, he's still known and well regarded for his work.

As a 14 year old, it was also pretty unlikely I was going to get fitted up for one of his bike builds, so its not like he was doing the tour for a potential customer. However, it put the thought in my mind that I'd like a bike built just for me one day.

So, a few *cough* (midlife crisis) years later, having bought a few 'retro' bikes and with the proliferation of new steel frames that were coming available, I'd been looking on the Internets for bike builders to make me a bike. I also bought the book 'Made in England' which was a guide to whats being made in the UK. I'd also seen that there were a bunch of framebuilding courses available. Many were booked up for a few years in advance and as there was nothing immediately available, I parked the idea under a to do list and sort of left it there.

Twitter was my undoing or savior, as I saw a local well regarded company called Enigma Bikes who had just started a Framebuilding course. I figured that if they were just starting, it was likely I could avoid a long wait, so phoned them. Sure enough, I could start pretty much immediately, but due to work I booked a date in November. I visited Enigma and said hello and met the staff and also the Tutor Geoff Roberts. Geoff has spent 40 years building frames and the Roberts name may ring bells as he worked for Roberts cycles and also did his own frames. More to the point, I was gifted a Roberts about 7 years ago it's probably my favourite bike. Its an '88 model and its during the era he worked there.


So, this all seemed like the sort of thing I'd like to do. The only thing was 14 years old, was pretty much the last time I did anything with metal, at school, so it was going to be something of a beginners attempt and I really wasn't sure how I'd cope or work with it. It had the potential to be great or awful and my skillset was Zero. However, I kind of knew what I wanted to do....

OK, I had no idea actually what I wanted to do. Despite saying I was going to bug them to death with ideas and so on, I didn't and spent a lot of time worrying that really, come 10th November, I'd still not have decided.

On the 10th November, cup of tea in hand, it was only me that wasn't suprised to find out I still hadn't decided on what to build. We did a bike fit session and figued out my measurements but didn't have much to apply it to. After some questions, and a bit of cajoling, I came up with the idea of a 'go to' bike, a road bike. The bike Cad app came up with a nice compact frame with all the measurements and that was grand... until I changed my mind. On the jig. I just wanted another classic bike and that meant some changes to the frame, which we agreed on. After a while that is.

Wanting a classic frame meant that really I wasn't pushing the boundaries of anything progessive, certainly, a level top tube, lugged frame was not what you'd call avant garde, but I knew that making a track bike or similar, it wasn't going to get used as much as a bike I could just go and ride.

So, with all that out of the way, I started making my first frame.






 


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  • « Last Edit: November 18, 2014, 22:23 by froome19, Reason: Frontpage »

    Sauna in Duvel

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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #1 on: November 18, 2014, 00:21 »
    To start with, we were given a Columbus Zona tubeset, and a set of lugs. I say we, as there were two of us on the course making our own frames. Zona is a double-butted tube but its not a super light or difficult to work with and can be brazed with Brass. We had to put the jig to the angles we wanted and then start cutting an doing the miter work to make sure the tubes fitted into the lugs and sat nicely against the adjoining tubes. We had to file and trial fit this a  lot as accuracy counts. So, the first day was about getting the basic tubes to the right size against the template we had from the bike fit. Day one also included some practice brazing, where we put lugs together, brazed them, then cut them up and checked how we had done. Yes, the first few were a bit rough so we did some more as practice and they improved. It was of course helpful having a framebuilder on hand to show us what to do and explain the reasons why.

    At the end of day one, we had mitered tubes and we'd done the brazing of the bottom tube to the head tube. We'd also tacked the seat tube into the bottom bracket as we needed to complete the front of the frame 1st.

    Day two consisted of more brazing, top tube, seat lug, so that the triangle was starting to take shape. In fact, it was a pretty quiet sort of day but we ended up with the front triangle sorted. We'd also spent a bit of time straightening the frame as we went along so that it wasn't a hideous mess of wonky tubes.

    At the end of day two, we had a front triangle and the rear stays tacked in place. In the second picture, the rear stays were purely attached by a spring so they wouldn't fall off.



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  • L'arri

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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #2 on: November 18, 2014, 00:27 »
    This is beyond cool.  :P Hoping there will be a complete story right up to the built bike.
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    Sauna in Duvel

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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #3 on: November 18, 2014, 00:33 »
    Day three was a lot of the same but things started to become a bit more critical as now the propensity to make a mess was amplified and of course starting again or remedial work was going to take time. On day three, we put in a wheel to work out where it would fit, how the stays were aligned, tacked everything together and the started on the brazing. the front triangle was a breeze compared to this as we had to try and get everything straight so that it'd look OK and work well as a frame. Again, the instructor and other staff that helped us guided us a lot to make sure we got it right (and no doubt save themselves a bit of time trying to put it right if we messed up).

    This day also flew along, we had to clear out the residue from the brazing and check alignment and so on. Latterly, we had to braze up the bottom bracket which was the last thing done as hopefully now all the rest was in place and where it was going to stay.

    Brazing the bottom bracket took about 15 minutes. Its a one step process, you have to heat it up for ages so that it retains the same sort of heat that you'll put the various frame tubes to for a much shorter period of time. Its hot work and you have to braze in '3d' (keep moving the frame and keeping things the right temp) so as not to ruin a tube or not get the brass to work around all the lugs effectively.  In the end, mcuh sweating and quite a bit of concentration, it was a basic frame. 3 triangles, aligned and solid.

    It needed cleaning and all the attachments fitting, but it was what hopefully most people would understand as a bike frame.

    Next were the various braze-ons.
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  • Sauna in Duvel

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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #4 on: November 18, 2014, 00:49 »
    Next up, there are all the braze on bits, bottle holders, brake bridge, stuff like that. Annoyingly for my hosts, I wanted downtube shift lever bosses. This involved quite a rummage around various old boxes and so on as lets face it, they rather fell out of favour when gear changes moved to the handlebar. My reasoning was (flawed or otherwise) that I had a bunch of old Campagnolo groupset bits and I could use them if I chose to at some point in the future - theres nothing more frustrating to people with modern frames than someone biking around using those old-fangled NON-INDEX downtube sh*ters and a 6 speed Freewheel.

    Given the bits available, I went for a brake bridge with some nice lugs that held it in place, a front mech hanger, double bottle mounts, brake bosses under the top tube and to really annoy my hosts, a chainhanger.  As well, just to top all that off, the top tube was a bit special as it was a discontinued tube that some might recognise from before the whole Internets existed.

    These parts were all silver soldered in place which was a bit easier than the brazing in some ways, but applying heat was very tricky as you really had to do it quickly as silver solder doesn't run well if the parts get too hot. At the end of day three, I had a frame and all the bits I wanted and quite a great deal of filing to do. Filing with a capital F.

    However, we did cheat a little as there was a media blasting cabinet on site so this cleared a lot of the now glazed flux and so on, but we used everything from the big f-ing file to needle files to clean up the excess brass to make the frame as clean as possible so that when it went to paint, it wouldn't leave a load of lumps that would show up. Probably a days filing really.



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  • Sauna in Duvel

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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #5 on: November 18, 2014, 01:02 »
    Day four didn't start as well, I ended up being ill and had to very reluctantly ring in sick to my holiday! I was pretty annoyed with this and went to sleep for a few hours to try and sort myself. I turned up at my workbench around 2.30 and started trying to catch up. Luckily, I was a bit ahead of where I needed to be. So I did more filing and cleaning, then it was back to the surface plate where we measured the frame tracking again and performed various dragging on the tubes to align things again. It looks pretty brutal to watch and there is the fact that you can still ripple a tube or pop a braze at this point and make the three previous days a waste of time.

    All that said, its not like you cannot recover from these situations, its just that its a lot of work and you only have five days to make a whole frame. As well, the course has a policy that you'll leave with a frame at the end of it, so there's some assurance that those who know better are on hand to fix up your own F-ups. On day four, we were now doing tracking of the stays, facing and re-doing those bottom bracket threads so that it could go to the paint shop and turn into a bike.

    Geoff, the tutor and in fact all of the staff, were really keen and helpful and wanted to see how we were getting on with things.

    So at the end of day four, I ended up with what I can only describe as something approximating a bike frame and 26 years of dithering about trying to get to this point.

    As well as a lot of advice, 40 years of framebuilding for Geoff had quite a few anecdotes in there so it was not like we were doing anything that hadn't been done before, good or bad. Largely, whether because we had actually done a good job or because we were paying for a course,  everyone was supportive and agreed we'd not done bad.

    So, at this point, we only had cleaning up to do. However, its not quite that simple.

    * pics are a little out of sequence, the headtube being cut to square and the BB tool, whilst some of the cleaning had already been done.




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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #6 on: November 18, 2014, 01:06 »
    Very nice! :)

    Everyone interested in bespoke bicycles - actually, everyone interested in bicycles, period - should read Robert Penn's It's All About the Bike. The Pursuit of Happiness on Two Wheels. A lovely account of a man's quest to have the 'perfect' bike, and with a lot of the bicycle's history intervowen with that story.
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    Sauna in Duvel

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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #7 on: November 18, 2014, 01:13 »
    So, as they say, day five. The last day. Final day. Don't mess up.

    In fact we were quite a bit ahead, certainly if the stories of people finishing their frames late on the last day were anything to go by. Enigma had discussed our enthusiasm and decided that as there was basically not a great deal to do for us on the Friday, we'd get a chance to do the next step, which involved the paint booth.

    So today we were dressed up in paper suits, masks, gloves to ensure that our mucky selves were not going to contaminate their paint shop and also our frames. Dressed like something out of an early 90's Rave video, we mixed etching primer and got the chance with some more guidance to put that onto the frame.

    After spending an age sanding and filing and cleaning everything, then doing it again, then some more, it was quite strange to see the shiny steel finally turn a shade of.... green, which was the base coat of primer. We had cleaned the hell out of the frames and now was the moment where we'd start to see if we'd really tidied things up properly.

    As humans, we are messy things, fluff, grease, hair, allsorts, really contaminates paint unless you prep for it. Hence the funky outfits we had to wear, with hats and masks etc.

    The frame will probably have something like 6 - 9 coats of primer, paint and clear laquer and we'll not be doing all of that but we at least got to start on it.

     
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  • Sauna in Duvel

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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #8 on: November 18, 2014, 01:30 »
    So finally for now, the frame, some info on it.

    Its a lugged Columbus Zona tubeset which is oversized. They do two sizes and this is the smaller size where the top tube is equivalent to an older downtube (don't ask me the sizes as I can't remember!). Its 73 degrees at teh headtube and seat tube and has a parallel top tube. Frame is 57.5 centre to centre on the seat tube, 57 C-C on the top tube. It'll have about 20 mm of spacers on the steering column, of which  at least one spacer will be made of silver and custom cut and engraved by my dearest.

    The top tube is different - its a Columbus SL tube with Gilco type profile (star shaped) which is like those seem on Colnago's and other similar bikes. This is an old downtube due to the oversizing and its probably a bit on the over-engineered side, but having seen it, I asked if I could build with it. The frame will have steel forks that will be built by the tutor due to time and safety constraints.

    Underside of the top tube is the rear brake cable mounts, 2 bottle cages, lugged rear brake stay, chain holder and front mech hanger sized up for 53 tooth chainring. Rear dropouts are Ritchey vertical style and the lugs are made by IS. Paint will be 3 colours (and my own design which I'll not show yet until its done). Build took 4 days in total and whilst its probably not the lightest thing in the world or perhaps the most accurate, it should be the sort of frame I wanted.

    Heres a few pics.


    Its now away for two weeks being painted, then its going to be a few more weeks while a build the wheels and get the groupset ready. Will update more when progress continues.

    Thanks for reading!

    Thanks go to Enigma Bicycles their staff, Geoff Roberts and Les Rigden that inspired me a long time ago.
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  • Sauna in Duvel

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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #9 on: November 18, 2014, 01:45 »
    This is beyond cool.  :P Hoping there will be a complete story right up to the built bike.

    it'll be a few weeks but yes I will aim to update it when I have a bit more to it. Thanks :)
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  • Sauna in Duvel

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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #10 on: November 18, 2014, 01:49 »
    Very nice! :)

    Everyone interested in bespoke bicycles - actually, everyone interested in bicycles, period - should read Robert Penn's It's All About the Bike. The Pursuit of Happiness on Two Wheels. A lovely account of a man's quest to have the 'perfect' bike, and with a lot of the bicycle's history intervowen with that story.

    I have the book and the video of the TV program that I watch occasionally - they are both really good and were inspiring... Not least that Rob's original around the world bike was also a Roberts. I'm trying also to get as many bits for the bike sourced from Europe too, Unlikely that I can do it all but I'll give it a go. :)
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  • « Last Edit: November 18, 2014, 01:59 by Sauna in Duvel »

    L'arri

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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #11 on: November 18, 2014, 09:03 »
    My fervent hopes of a full story were realised! :lol

    Thanks so much, SiD. That was a joy to read.

    So you basically pay Enigma for the time and the tuition, in addition to the materials, and they let you roll up your sleeves.

    That's brilliant. It's like those vineyards they have in France where you get together with friends and produce your own wine, from the vine husbandry right down to the label on the bottle. Most people do that for fun but I know of one little group that actually sells theirs to restaurants.

    But I digress. Tell us, what is that top tube. It looks terribly familiar but I can't quite place it!

    I laughed when you described the pain of demanding down tube lever braze-ons. I'd have thought a lot of people going for the 'vintage look' would be interested in those, so it was a surprise to read that they're so uncommon these days. Lucky you found some anyway!

    Can't wait to see the paintjob.
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  • ebandit

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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #12 on: November 18, 2014, 09:23 »
    Brilliant......I know of quite a few people who have done the Dave Yates course with the sound of Typhoons roaring overhead but the Enigma one is new to me.........I believe they have a guy welding in Ti now......did you get to have a look around?

    Mark L
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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #13 on: November 18, 2014, 09:27 »
    Read this over b-fast, great way to start the day
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  • Of course, if this turns out someday to be the industry standard integrated handlebar-computer-braking solution then I'll eat my kevlar-reinforced aerodynamic hat.

    Larri Nov 12, 2014

    Sauna in Duvel

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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #14 on: November 18, 2014, 10:28 »

    But I digress. Tell us, what is that top tube. It looks terribly familiar but I can't quite place it!



    I've always known of it as 'Columbus Gilco' and I'd remembered the tubes from Colnago frames. Its actually a Columbus SL tube and then it looks like its formed into shape in a press (one end of the tube has what appear to be roller marks on it). There are some Columbus stickers that mention Gilco and some that mention Gilco and 'design for Colnago' so I don't know what the origins are as yet. I also think there might have been more profiles and doing an image search on a popular search engine, it seems that there are quite a lot of different makes of frames built with it.

    As mentioned its actually a downtube that was re-used, as it fits with the oversized lugs so therefore it was a bit over-engineered for the task its set for now, excepting that I'm not the lightest rider to grace a bike.

    As they had a fair bit of tubing onsite, including some 753, it was nice to compare them - the 753 tube was actually interesting because its diameter is small and the thickness at the ends make it look quite stout compared to a modern tube, plus, it had to be silver soldered, so its impressive the way things move on.


     
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  • L'arri

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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #15 on: November 18, 2014, 10:46 »
    I've always known of it as 'Columbus Gilco' and I'd remembered the tubes from Colnago frames. Its actually a Columbus SL tube and then it looks like its formed into shape in a press (one end of the tube has what appear to be roller marks on it). There are some Columbus stickers that mention Gilco and some that mention Gilco and 'design for Colnago' so I don't know what the origins are as yet. I also think there might have been more profiles and doing an image search on a popular search engine, it seems that there are quite a lot of different makes of frames built with it.

    As mentioned its actually a downtube that was re-used, as it fits with the oversized lugs so therefore it was a bit over-engineered for the task its set for now, excepting that I'm not the lightest rider to grace a bike.

    As they had a fair bit of tubing onsite, including some 753, it was nice to compare them - the 753 tube was actually interesting because its diameter is small and the thickness at the ends make it look quite stout compared to a modern tube, plus, it had to be silver soldered, so its impressive the way things move on.

    Yeah! I wondered if it was on Colnagos that I'd seen that tubing.

    I read someplace that it freaks you out how thin the steel tubing is when you look at the cross-section, especially given how solid it all looks once put together. That said, I feel rather the same about carbon when I doorknock it with my knuckles (a ridiculous habit I picked up from my father who used to do it to the walls on the building sites where he worked).
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  • Sauna in Duvel

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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #16 on: November 18, 2014, 10:48 »
    Brilliant......I know of quite a few people who have done the Dave Yates course with the sound of Typhoons roaring overhead but the Enigma one is new to me.........I believe they have a guy welding in Ti now......did you get to have a look around?

    Mark L

    The Dave Yates course was recommended to me a few years back by a few people and it seemed to have quite a waiting list, so I knew of it but hadn't really checked back on availability. This one was driveable distance so I didn't have to stay nearby but I've heard and read good things on the Yates one.

    I didn't know much about the company until about a 2 years ago, plus a friend has one of their bikes - I believe they were set up as a TI frame producer and did steel too. We got the factory tour as part of the course, the thing I like about framebuilders is all the weird tools that would only serve one purpose in one industry such as a front mech holder that allows you to braze (pic below).

    So as a bit of a geek on all of it, it was a really good week. Another thing I didn't appreciate was that they go through a lot of cutters and so on as TI is really hard to work with, so yes you have a nice posh frame but engineering wise, its quite tough to make.

    All in all, I'd recommend considering any such course if you ever felt the need to put your own name on a headtube.



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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #17 on: November 18, 2014, 11:12 »
    Yeah! I wondered if it was on Colnagos that I'd seen that tubing.

    I read someplace that it freaks you out how thin the steel tubing is when you look at the cross-section, especially given how solid it all looks once put together. That said, I feel rather the same about carbon when I doorknock it with my knuckles (a ridiculous habit I picked up from my father who used to do it to the walls on the building sites where he worked).
    Yep sometimes Physics flips with your head

    had they been the same thickness materal but flat not round, you could have probably bent it with your fingers
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  • Sauna in Duvel

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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #18 on: November 18, 2014, 11:19 »
    Well a good example is that its pretty tough to drill, but really realy easy to dent outwards the other side of the tube when the drill finally goes through the frame.

    I did this on the seat tube at the top where we had to drill a release hole for the gasses when brazing (it hides in the seat lug, most bikes have them). So I was drilling and putting on pressure for that, it took an age and sure enough, drill finally goes through the tube and leaves a nice little protruding lump on the other side, despite me being warned that could happen. Not really a problem as that bit got removed as the seatclamp sits there.

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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #19 on: November 18, 2014, 14:14 »
    That said, I feel rather the same about carbon when I doorknock it with my knuckles (a ridiculous habit I picked up from my father who used to do it to the walls on the building sites where he worked).
    Nothing ridiculous about it, I do it as well. That lovely sound a carbon bike - and of course a steel bike, even more so! - makes when you knock on it ... :Heart:
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  • al_pacino

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    Re: On which side does Sir or Madame... Braze?
    « Reply #20 on: November 18, 2014, 15:30 »
    Who after reading that isn't empted to have a go themselves?

    An excellent read.
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  • Sauna in Duvel

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    Re: On which side..?
    « Reply #21 on: December 11, 2014, 21:04 »
    So here is an update.

    I have spent a few weeks finding the gears and bits for the bike. I decided that as I wanted a bike that was more classic in appearance, that a silver groupset was going to be the thing to have. I also decided that as far as possible, I would aim for products that at least, were seen to be from Europe. Mostly I wanted Campagnolo, Mavic, Cinelli etc (not that I have anything against other brands, quite the opposite in fact).

    I also had a friend who helped me out by designing me a headbadge. And, with the colours I chose, the last 2 weeks has seen the frame being sprayed.

    Next Wednesday, I finally take all the bits and hopefully end up with the finished product at the end.

    Heres a sneak pic of the forks...

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  • Sauna in Duvel

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    Re: On which side..?
    « Reply #22 on: December 11, 2014, 21:31 »
    Other things that needed to be done were to find the little items.

    The downtube adapters for brake-shifters are easily bought but usually they are from Shimano or CSN. Obviously with my *ahem* european parts rule this would not do. So I searched and noted that Campagnolo did make those in the past and having found a part number, also found they were pretty scarce.

    Luckily, campyoldy.co.uk came to the rescue again, as they had some. This was about 3 hours of bits finding for something pretty simple to get elsewhere but I knew it was going to bug me if I didn't sort it.

    This was similar with the seatpost bolt (Campag) which was out of stock in a lot of places whilst finding a stepped ferrule for the gearcable on the chainstay was also fun as they are getting more scarce - typically I had chosen the awkward frame mount for this.

    I also dusted off (if you can do that with a PDF document) my copy of a wheelbuilding book by Roger Musson, and started putting together the wheels which were Campag / Mavic and Sapim. They are largely round and will get tidied up when the bike is built next week hopefully.

    So other than that, I really can't wait to get stuck in and build it, which should be pretty soon..

    http://instagram.com/p/wZzuHJxoYr/?modal=true

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  • L'arri

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    Re: On which side..?
    « Reply #23 on: December 11, 2014, 21:48 »
    This is just brill. Can't wait for the pics.  :cool
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: On which side..?
    « Reply #24 on: December 11, 2014, 21:52 »
    the wheels are largely round
    How fortunate! :D




    ;)
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  • Sauna in Duvel

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    Re: On which side..?
    « Reply #25 on: December 18, 2014, 18:03 »
    So, largely we're done :)

    Yesterday I turned up at Enigma with a box of bits and some high hopes. Hopeful that I would have a bike at the end of the day and that I hadn't managed to order a load of ill-fitting parts or bits that were not going to connect and so on.

    Also sometimes it is quite easy to build a bike from bits when the frame is there and you can see whats missing and although I know that I needed everything, I also knew I was likely to forget something too.

    So where do we start. Well, the first thing was as I had built the wheels which were round (ish), once they went on the wheel jig it was obvious that they were not all that round after all. They were close but not good enough, This was my first time using a wheel jig and this one had dial guages as well which measure in 10ths of mm so that dial kept bouncing around convincing me that 1) it was probably the workman and not the tool and 2) wheelbuilding is for people with patience levels that I don't currently have.

    Whilst I got some useful tips from the mechanic, he did gleefully let me finish the wheels myself and eventually after a while, they were actually round and actually straight (well very close). In honesty they were not going to be perfect by me and I was pleased with the result, largely that the dial gauges were not going like a seismograph in that film where the seismograph goes wild. I was then allowed to open the box, fit the tyres and the cassette, so at this point I had actually made a whole set of wheels.

    Next was the headset which is a hope unit and very nicely made but we did have to do a little bit of extra reaming on the frame as they can be a little tight to fit. The headset cutting tool is a bit of a beast compared to the home unit I had and the reaming adds a bit of heat to the frame so we had to keep calm and stop to allow the metal to cool - it can bubble the paint if not done with a bit of patience. Thus after probably an hour of carefully working on all the bits, I finally had a frame and forks joined up.



     

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  • L'arri

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    Re: On which side..?
    « Reply #26 on: December 18, 2014, 18:09 »
    ... Awesomeness ....

    Probably you're going to give us a full spec but what are those Mavic rims?
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  • Sauna in Duvel

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    Re: On which side..?
    « Reply #27 on: December 18, 2014, 18:24 »
    So next I was left by Greg my able mechanic to my own devices for a while, I did some really important fitting of, err, the seatpost bolt, the downtube bosses, the cable guides etc. As the paint was new and quite thick in places (it had several coats for the colours) I had to do a little trimming of the paint with a scalpel to getthings to fit nicely and not bunch up a load of paint behind things.

    I put in the brake calipers and now as we were approaching fitting bars etc, we put some protective sleeves on the frame. (largely as I have a habit of scratching newly painted frames).

    I had not done a Campagnolo BB fitting before so I asked for a little help with this and duly got it. This took a little while as fitting and re-fitting it was necessary and an adjustment to the frame indent was also needed as things were a bit tight. With a few slighly troubled brows working on it, it passed without a drama and no frames were harmed in the adjustment, nor was the paint.

    Back on the workstand and the day was getting on and I was still faffing about taking my time with everything but realising that I needed to get on with it. I still had cables and gears to fit and set up, bar tape and so on.

    Whilst largely I can and have put a lot of bikes together, it was probably the first time I had worked with someone who's job it was to do this so again, it was interesting to hear what works and what doesn't. It was nice to know some of the things I do were the right way to do it and some perhaps not!.


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  • Sauna in Duvel

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    Re: On which side..?
    « Reply #28 on: December 18, 2014, 18:42 »
    Ok so as things got a bit fast and furious as the day went on, the picture count dropped and assistance levels went up - not that there was a problem with the help just that I wanted to do as much as possible.

    As you may recall (there is an exam at the end for you who weren't paying attention) I wanted a 'classic' looking bike with Campagnolo / other parts that are *cough* made in europe (largely ignoring the made in china stickers on a euro-badged few bits).

    We fiddled with the gear cable outers and cut them to length whilst also routing things, generally trying to not annoy each other as we both worked on the bike. Getting the brake levers not only level but pleasing was of course important as was the seat angle and how far back it was on the stem.

    This was of course in contrary to a few of the bike fit measurements but I'm sure I'll grow into them just fine ;) Its no use if it looks wrong obviously. (OK, it fits fine).

    The one thing I did not do was the bar tape. I figured that in the future I'll be doing that again anyhow so left it with the expert who did a really nice job and showed me how to finish it properly.

    Having not been able to find a silver bar / stem / post combo, I opted for white. This stuff is probably the only few bits I'd change really but they look OK and if I find something more suitable I can do that later.

    The final part of the day was a very slight ream of the seat tube to clear out a bit of paint and get in the seatpost. at this point the bike touched the floor with the wheels for the first time and I was getting pretty impatient to jump on it but we needed to get the post right, which took a little while.

    JOB DONE.

    Thinking I was holding everyone up, I was asked if I wouldn't mind them taking a few photo's and so on so that was fine with me..
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  • Sauna in Duvel

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    Re: On which side..?
    « Reply #29 on: December 18, 2014, 18:53 »
    So Finally.. a bike. How does it ride? well thats for another day. I will find a nice day for that. So instead, here are a few pics that I took, back at the bench it was made on and on the bike stand.

    I'll do a spec list and a thanks list later, but thank you for reading I hope it was interesting :)
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