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just some guy

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Q & A Marco Pinotti
« on: January 08, 2015, 09:02 »
Q & A Marco Pinotti

Marco will ne no stranger to any cycling fan, and he has kindly offered to answer a few questions from us. It will not be a live Q&A but I will email Marco with the Questions which he will respond too via email and then I will post here. So get your question in so they can be sent to Marco early next week.



Marco Pinotti (born 25 February 1976 in Osio Sotto, Lombardy) is an Italian former road racing cyclist, who competed as a professional between 1999 and 2013.[2] An individual time trial specialist, Pinotti was a six-time Italian Time Trial Champion (2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2013

As an amateur he won 28 races before turneding professional in 1999 with the Lampre-Daikin team. He won the Grand Prix d'Europa in 1999 together with his teammate Raivis Belohvoščiks and the 5th stage of the 2000 Tour de Pologne.

In 2001 he finished second in stage 15 of the Tour de France behind Belgian Rik Verbrugghe. He had surgery on his ulna in November 2001 and started training again only in February 2002. He returned to competition in April 2002.

The 2003 season brought some victories as he won the 4th stage in the Tour of the Basque Country and the King of the Mountains classification. In the Bici Vasca he crashed and broke his pelvis, forcing recuperation. He has since fully recovered. His speciality is in individual time trials.

Pinotti joined the then newly formed Spanish team Saunier Duval-Prodir team in 2005. He won the Italian National Time Trial Championship in 2005. Pinotti came second to Luca Ascani in the 2007 Italian National time trials[3] but Ascani was found to have tested positive for EPO and Pinotti was awarded the jersey.[4] Pinotti retained the title in 2008.

At the 2007 Giro d'Italia, Pinotti placed second in stage six to Spoleto and took over the leader's pink jersey. He held it for four stages. In 2008, he won the final stage time trial, and again in 2012. In 2009 and 2011, he help his teams win the team time trial. The result in 2011 helped him take over the pink jersey for one day.

In 2008, Pinotti joined team Highroad, which became Columbia HighRoad in 2009 and HTC-Columbia in 2010.

Pinotti joined the BMC Racing Team for 2012 following the disbanding of the HTC-Highroad team. At the end of the year, he released a book, Il Mestiere Del Ciclista Una Vita In Bicicletta (The Cycling Professor).

In October 2013 Pinotti announced that he would retire from racing after competing in the Tour of Beijing and Chrono des Nations, transitioning to a position in the Sports Science division of BMC Racing Team.
SOURCE

Professional team(s)
1998 –→ Polti (stagiaire)
1999-2004Lampre-Daikin
2005–2006Saunier Duval-Prodir
2007–2011 T-Mobile Team
2012–2013 BMC Racing Team[1]

 
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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #2 on: January 08, 2015, 09:40 »
    You once posted a photo of you with Bob Stapleton on twitter, with a cooment the man who changed my view on cycling - or something like that

    I have always wanted to more, the hiow and the why of that statement
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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #3 on: January 08, 2015, 16:08 »
    What is your current role at BMC it says trainer but what does that involve day to day, week to week, and do you still look after Linda Villumsen?
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  • Leadbelly

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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #4 on: January 08, 2015, 18:51 »
    If the hour record rules had changed a few years back, would you have been interested in making an attempt?

    Have the changes to the rules spoilt the concept of the challenge in your opinion?
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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #5 on: January 09, 2015, 07:19 »
    I had forgotten you road for Saunier Duval-Prodir, how hard was it seeing the going on and not yelling it from the tree tops. I guess that question can be expanded to generalise , how hard was it being an Italian cyclist and riding for some of your early teams and not to dope or  tell the world about it?
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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #6 on: January 09, 2015, 09:39 »
    Looking from the outside, the BMC team feels quite different from 2012 (when you joined as a rider) to now in 2015.

    Do you feel it has changed, and if so can you tell us a bit about Allan Peiper's effect on this? Is it an oversimplification to say that before he joined, the team had too many chiefs and not enough braves? Is it unfair to say the team is now more professional than it was in 2012?
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  • froome19

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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #7 on: January 09, 2015, 10:35 »
    This maybe a rather unoriginal question and I admittedly haven't read your book. But what do you think of the climbing times being posted in today's world of cycling. Are they believable?

    Also as mentioned above, the BMC team from the exterior appeared to be one of the most unstructured teams in the World Tour just a year or two ago. Was that the impression you got? And what has been the defining change? Did you see other team's blueprints for success and base your own strategy on theirs?
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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #8 on: January 09, 2015, 16:00 »
    It's the time of year when cyclists start pulling on their new kit and riding their new bikes. And then posting it all on Twitter and Instagram.

    But just how much kit does a pro-cyclist get each season. And what happens to it at the end of the year?
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  • He shook his head sadly and told me that endemic drug use had compelled him to give up a promising career. "Even one small local race, prize was a salami, and I see doping!" - Tim Moore: Gironimo (Riding the Very Terrible 1914 Tour of Italy)

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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #9 on: January 09, 2015, 19:49 »
    Some simple ones

    Best rider that youve ever had as a teammate
    Best team boss youve ever riden under
    Best DS youve worked with

    And slightly more in-depth.

    Youve mentioned in a few interviews that Chris Horner was someone who taught you a lot and you admired as a rider. When he won the Vuelta obviously a lot of eyebrows were raised, and questions were raised about his blood profile for the race, etc.

    Not asking for an opinion on that, but how difficult is it, or how do you seperate the person from the situation, ie. being friends with or admiring someone as an individual, but also having to deal with accusations etc that come up. And how hard is that generally, and also the general pressure from social media,  im thinking the issue with Tejay being paced by Armstrong which brought attention to Tejay.

    With so much focus on the sport now, from both traditional media and social media, for instance balancing friendships while at the same time thinking "sh*t, if im photographed talking to that person" rumours/stories etc will start.

    I guess what im saying is how do you deal with the issue of intrusion from press and social media,
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  • Vimto

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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #10 on: January 09, 2015, 20:54 »
    My questions are about Team Time Trials. 

    Congratulations on winning the World Championships this year! I really enjoyed watching it but sometimes I feel like I'm the only one. 

    Do you think they are worth having at the World Championships? I ask because I understand they are quite expensive to attend and I wondered if the team management and riders think it's worthwhile (for sponsorship exposure etc.)

    How do you pick and train a team for the Team Time Trials?
    For GT's, do you pick a squad with with consideration for the Team Time Trial, or is that not necessary for the overall race? 
    Do you have special camps during the year which focus on it?

    I hope that's not too much to ask...
    I read your book and really enjoyed it so thank you for taking the time to answer questions here... :cool
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  • al_pacino

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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #11 on: January 10, 2015, 11:49 »
    Most of your successes have been in individual events but do you get anything like the same satisfaction in playing more of a team role in helping a team-mate  win? (honestly)
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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #12 on: January 10, 2015, 11:50 »
    Much of what makes you interesting, indeed something of an enigma, for many fans of our sport is expressed here:



    Since then, you've retired. Some questions on the topic of retirement ...

    Retirement is of course inevitable for all pro cyclists and your sixteen seasons represent a long career by most riders' standards.

    - At what point did retirement start to enter your mind or were you always somehow ready for it?

    - When Flecha quit, he went surfing. Did you actually take a break between racing and your new career at BMC?

    - Do you think that some pros find it hard to adapt to life after racing?

    - In your new role, you seem almost to be as mobile as you were when racing, meanwhile you have a young family. Is it easier to balance your work and personal life nowadays?
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  • Cycling is a Europe thing only and I only watch from Omloop on cause I am cool and sh*t
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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #13 on: January 10, 2015, 17:16 »
    Do you think that some pros find it hard to adapt to life after racing?

    On a related note, do you think there are things that teams can do (or is there anything teams are doing) to help prepare riders for a life after cycling.

    I see sometimes for instance in football where players are given time by their clubs to pursue their coaching badges prior to retirement. Weve seen some situations in cycling where riders have been able to pursue degrees while also competing to give them a basis for a career after the sport.

    There seem to be various paths after cycling.
    There is of course the downward path weve seen many times of riders struggling to adapt to "normal" life
    Some go into roles as director sportif's
    Some go into the media
    Some employed by cycling manufacturers either in a technical aspect or as a "brand"

    But in general these represent a very small percentage of proffessional cyclists.

    Are there any instances of things that teams are actually doing to prepare riders for a life after the sport, and is there anything the teams could be doing in this respect.

    (one thing occurs to me with reduced race days proposed by the UCI is there is room for some of the younger riders to ride an easier schedule and balance it with some form of education)

    One area ive noticed there seems to be no movement from cyclist to post cycling is mechanics, i can think of very few cyclists that after their career have gone on to be mechanics
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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #14 on: January 11, 2015, 17:20 »
    Hi Marco,
    Some of these questions might be extensions of those already asked.

    - what do you regret most about your career?

    - what have you learned from working with Julich?

    - what rider(s) do you look forward to working with most this year?

    - do you aspire to become a DS?  What will Cadel's role be?

    - who does Jim O. consult with when adding riders or planning teams future?

    I'll need to pick up your book.
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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #15 on: January 12, 2015, 09:27 »
    last 24 hours until I send the questions to Marco
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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #16 on: January 12, 2015, 09:44 »
    Hello Marco, thanks for your time,  I have two questions for you

    when you crashed out of the 2012 time trial at the Limburg World Championships, you were on track to finish that race on the podium for the first time in your career - and as we know now, it also was your last chance to do so. Is "what could have been" something a cyclist thinks about in hindsight, or doesn't it bother you at all?


    and the second one: last year at the start of the Tour de France you have been to the Leeds University for the "World Congress of Cycling Science". As a team, do you make use of such an input of knowledge and ideas, and work together with Universities?
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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #18 on: January 12, 2015, 20:23 »
    How do you see the current state of Italian cycling? This year there is only one Italian team at the highest level. Without looking at the numbers, I don't think this has been that low in many years. And that is despite Nibali becoming one of the biggest stars of the sport. What do you think will it take to 'revive' cycling in Italy?

    As far as I know you've never ridden Ronde van Vlaanderen or Paris-Roubaix - though correct me if I'm wrong. For me, and many other fans of the sport, those are the two biggest races of the year. Don't you regret never having ridden them?

    When are you going to run for UCI president?

    Are you a cyclocross fan / follower? If so, who is your bet for the world championships?
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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #19 on: January 13, 2015, 02:41 »
    I like (and repeat) slow riders question

    "when are you going to run for UCI president?'


    Do you think you will be given an opportunity to take charge of the italian national team?   Is your outspoken anti-doping stance a factor in whether or not you would be considered?

    Do you think race radio's should be allowed?
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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #20 on: January 13, 2015, 09:16 »
    Questions closed email being sent ....
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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #21 on: January 14, 2015, 09:59 »
    MARCO PINOTTI INTERVIEW



    Marco Pinotti (MP)
    I’ve finished. After a long day at wind tunnel I find the time to answer. It was a pleasure. As big as the night sleep I will do in a few minutes.

    Thanks for all the fan for asking.

    Q1 What's the state of Italian cycling at the moment and how does he see its future in the next five years? - CafeRoubaix & SLOW RIDER

    it’s been healthier to use an euphemism… We have good young riders (Formolo the most known, but others are coming around) but what it misses is a certain development once they turned pro.

    Financial resources are missing to have good pro team that can guarantee a good racing program, a good structure and I am worried that this could have negative effects in the lower categories in the next 5 years. Lots of racing are disappearing (in junior&u23) so it’s difficult for young riders to take the time to see if they are good enough and mature. Sometimes they drop out before getting physically and mentally mature or /and for  school commitments. (MP)

    Q2 You once posted a photo of you with Bob Stapleton on twitter, with a cooment the man who changed my view on cycling - or something like that. I have always wanted to more, the how and the why of that statement - jsg


    First because he was the one to take me in T-mobile, second because he changed the structure of the team making a real change in cycling: strong anti doping commitments (with facts as well), in a time where it was not cool like today, evolution of how team is organized, focus on different area to improve performances, etc.. You can see my career step up after 2007. (MP)

    Q3 What is your current role at BMC it says trainer but what does that involve day to day, week to week, and do you still look after Linda Villumsen? - jsg


    I am a coach and member of Performance team. I train riders and together with other members of the group, implement strategies, organize camp, support riders to perform better.
    I still look after Linda, it’s 5 yrs now. She just won Nationals RR (MP)

    Q4 If the hour record rules had changed a few years back, would you have been interested in making an attempt? Leadbelly

    not a few years, 6-7 months would have been enough. I finished my career with 2 good tt: Firenze and GP Nations. Doing the trial after that with tt position would have been perfect and test done told me I could have done a good results.

    Have the changes to the rules spoilt the concept of the challenge in your opinion? - Leadbelly

    from one side it increased the interest and it makes people and the cycling world thinking about the record again. But it will be a temporary effect. Until someone will raise the bar again really high. (MP)


    Q5 I had forgotten you road for Saunier Duval-Prodir, how hard was it seeing the going on and not yelling it from the tree tops. I guess that question can be expanded to generalise , how hard was it being an Italian cyclist and riding for some of your early teams and not to dope or  tell the world about it? - jsg


    l forgot how hard it felt because I had my satisfactions later in my career. Back then the hardest part was to felt somehow unfit to race when it was not probably the case. And frustrating was going home and  being told to other people I wasn’t so good. (MP)

    Q6 Looking from the outside, the BMC team feels quite different from 2012 (when you joined as a rider) to now in 2015.

    Do you feel it has changed, and if so can you tell us a bit about Allan Peiper's effect on this? Is it an oversimplification to say that before he joined, the team had too many chiefs and not enough braves? Is it unfair to say the team is now more professional than it was in 2012? -Leadbelly


    it was professional as well when I joined them. Allan just brought back a little bit more structured program and a change in mentality.(MP)

    Q7 Also as mentioned above, the BMC team from the exterior appeared to be one of the most unstructured teams in the World Tour just a year or two ago. Was that the impression you got? And what has been the defining change? Did you see other team's blueprints for success and base your own strategy on theirs? - F19

    not I didnt have that impression. We didnt base our strategy on other teams. We probably tried to implement the mentality of HighRoad, in my opinion the team that was really innovative in the last decade or so.(MP)

    Q8 This maybe a rather unoriginal question and I admittedly haven't read your book. But what do you think of the climbing times being posted in today's world of cycling. Are they believable? - F19

    I can talk about the riders I have  contact and I believe their time are. When I was racing it seemed a certain power to weight ratio to perform in the same race was the same and this hasn’t changed.There are more riders achieving that level but this is due to an increase of the average level of the riders in World Tour. You have also to take account that the base of selection of athlete is now wider (cycling attracts more continent and more nations rather than  Eurocentric like it was 20 yrs ago). (MP)

    Q9 It's the time of year when cyclists start pulling on their new kit and riding their new bikes. And then posting it all on Twitter and Instagram.

    But just how much kit does a pro-cyclist get each season. And what happens to it at the end of the year? -CJ


    more or less 10 to 12 or 15 kit each year. It depends how many GT you do. New fabric (aero) doesn’t last months. At the end of the year you keep what’s left and you can give away a few.
    Depends. I have two brothers who rides bike too... (MP)

    Q10 Best rider that youve ever had as a teammate -DIM

    Belohvosciks  Raivis (MP)

    Q11 Best team boss youve ever riden under - DIM

    I’d say two: Stapleton and Ochowicz.(MP)

    Q12 Best DS youve worked with - DIM

    Valerio Piva (MP)

    Q13 And slightly more in-depth.

    Youve mentioned in a few interviews that Chris Horner was someone who taught you a lot and you admired as a rider. When he won the Vuelta obviously a lot of eyebrows were raised, and questions were raised about his blood profile for the race, etc.

    Not asking for an opinion on that, but how difficult is it, or how do you seperate the person from the situation, ie. being friends with or admiring someone as an individual, but also having to deal with accusations etc that come up. And how hard is that generally, and also the general pressure from social media,  im thinking the issue with Tejay being paced by Armstrong which brought attention to Tejay.

    With so much focus on the sport now, from both traditional media and social media, for instance balancing friendships while at the same time thinking "sh*t, if im photographed talking to that person" rumours/stories etc will start.

    I guess what im saying is how do you deal with the issue of intrusion from press and social media,- DIM


    I think it’s not how the media behave or intrude into your life. It’s how you respond to this eventual intrusion. If you really care about friendship you should not bother and do what you truly believe is important for you.
    But before that one should think that at a point you are a role model for young kids and not only, so every choice , decision or opinion should be well reasoned.(MP)

    My questions are about Team Time Trials.

    Congratulations on winning the World Championships this year! I really enjoyed watching it but sometimes I feel like I'm the only one.

    Q14 Do you think they are worth having at the World Championships? I ask because I understand they are quite expensive to attend and I wondered if the team management and riders think it's worthwhile (for sponsorship exposure etc.) - VIMTO


    For the sponsor, especially technical, it is a very important event. The quintessential event for a team in a sport where individual are always celebrated. They worth taking place.(MP)

    Q15 How do you pick and train a team for the Team Time Trials? - VIMTO

    choose the best motivated riders. Riders that alone are not winning machine. Riders that know that only riding together as a team they can ever be World Champion.(MP)

    Q16 For GT's, do you pick a squad with with consideration for the Team Time Trial, or is that not necessary for the overall race?  - VIMTO

    depends on how long is the TTT and how does its results weights on the general balance. How big of a difference you can make in a TTT.
    But if I were only me to decide I’d bring the best team to try to win the TTT. winning a GC in GT is very difficult and you need the right riders and a good luck.(MP)

    Q17 Do you have special camps during the year which focus on it? -VIMTO

    yes we have. Not many but very specific (MP)

    Q18 - Most of your successes have been in individual events but do you get anything like the same satisfaction in playing more of a team role in helping a team-mate  win? (honestly) - AL_PACINO

    There is nothing when you win as an individual in my opinion, except when you win a TTT.

    Much of what makes you interesting, indeed something of an enigma, for many fans of our sport is expressed here:



    Since then, you've retired. Some questions on the topic of retirement ...

    Retirement is of course inevitable for all pro cyclists and your sixteen seasons represent a long career by most riders' standards.

    Q19 - At what point did retirement start to enter your mind or were you always somehow ready for it? Larri


    when I crashed in Tour of Med February 2013 (MP)

    Q20 - When Flecha quit, he went surfing. Did you actually take a break between racing and your new career at BMC? larri

    not at all, I came back from Tour of Beijing on Wed directly to Grenchen, where the team got together and until Saturday I participated ( as a coach) to the the team meeting planning the following season.
    Then Saturday I left for France to partecipate to GP Nations (my last race). So there were no breaks, for a few days I was still a rider and a already a coach.. (MP)

    Q21 - Do you think that some pros find it hard to adapt to life after racing? - Larri

    yes, it’s such a nice life being  pro athlete , then it’s hard to find something as good and as motivational.  The thing is that it requires such dedications that you barely have time to cultivate  other interests and sometimes you don’t even want to., because you don’t feel the needs. It’s like transitioning from school (when you know you really finish it, I mean you can still do some courses but you know when school as you knew as a child, is never going to be the same). some days it seems you don’t like it, but once it’s finished you missed it so much (at least for me it was like this).(MP)

    Q22 - In your new role, you seem almost to be as mobile as you were when racing, meanwhile you have a young family. Is it easier to balance your work and personal life nowadays? -Larri

    At the moment I travel less than before. It’s not easy but I hope the family are happy and I hope to make them happy also in the future.(MP)

    Q23 - Do you think that some pros find it hard to adapt to life after racing?

    On a related note, do you think there are things that teams can do (or is there anything teams are doing) to help prepare riders for a life after cycling.

    I see sometimes for instance in football where players are given time by their clubs to pursue their coaching badges prior to retirement. Weve seen some situations in cycling where riders have been able to pursue degrees while also competing to give them a basis for a career after the sport.

    There seem to be various paths after cycling.
    There is of course the downward path weve seen many times of riders struggling to adapt to "normal" life
    Some go into roles as director sportif's
    Some go into the media
    Some employed by cycling manufacturers either in a technical aspect or as a "brand"

    But in general these represent a very small percentage of proffessional cyclists.

    Are there any instances of things that teams are actually doing to prepare riders for a life after the sport, and is there anything the teams could be doing in this respect.

    (one thing occurs to me with reduced race days proposed by the UCI is there is room for some of the younger riders to ride an easier schedule and balance it with some form of education)

    One area ive noticed there seems to be no movement from cyclist to post cycling is mechanics, i can think of very few cyclists that after their career have gone on to be mechanics - DIM


    Like you said many jobs are offered from the sport as whole itself and that is a very good thing. For the sport itself because it doesn’t throw away years of experience and a huge baggage of knowledge. For the person as well because it makes transition a little bit more less uncertain.
    One thing team can do is teach /force riders to  be proactive and problem solving oriented.
    Lots of riders becomes mechanics too, or carers, the transition is not immediate as it requires some time to learn the job.(MP)

    Hi Marco,
    Some of these questions might be extensions of those already asked.

    Q25 - what do you regret most about your career? - BLACKBANDIT


    1) a results I regret: WC 2013 in Limburg, see below
    2) something I regret not to have done: not having moved to a warmer place to train in winter (rent or buy a small apartment ) so that I didnt need to suffer cold and train in a better environment (MP)

    Q26 - what have you learned from working with Julich? - BLACKBANDIT

    that some former pro have coaching skills and mindset already inside them and they don’t know it until they start doing it.(MP)

    Q27 - what rider(s) do you look forward to working with most this year? - BLACKBANDIT

    the youngest(s) ones (MP)

    Q28 - do you aspire to become a DS?  What will Cadel's role be? - BLACKBANDIT

    It is not a priority at the moment. Cadel will be BMC world ambassador.

    Q29 - who does Jim O. consult with when adding riders or planning teams future? - BLACKBANDIT

    with Peiper and the DS group

    Q30 Hello Marco, thanks for your time,  I have two questions for you

    when you crashed out of the 2012 time trial at the Limburg World Championships, you were on track to finish that race on the podium for the first time in your career - and as we know now, it also was your last chance to do so. Is "what could have been" something a cyclist thinks about in hindsight, or doesn't it bother you at all? - Search


    goddam if it bothers me. That could have been the DAY in my career...

    Q31 and the second one: last year at the start of the Tour de France you have been to the Leeds University for the "World Congress of Cycling Science". As a team, do you make use of such an input of knowledge and ideas, and work together with Universities? - SEARCH

    yes we do. we look at studies and see if they have practical application. Most of the times tough, real world is already doing what science finds out works later

    Q32 - Any tips to the young cyclists who want to be like you ? - @_AlyaaNajwa19

    I have two
    1 Have fun during training, make it like your playtime.
    2 Avoid negative people.

    Q33 - What inspired you to start cycling? - @_AlyaaNajwa19

    my grandfather

    Q34 As far as I know you've never ridden Ronde van Vlaanderen or Paris-Roubaix - though correct me if I'm wrong. For me, and many other fans of the sport, those are the two biggest races of the year. Don't you regret never having ridden them? SLOW RIDER

    no regrets. I wasn’t a rider for those races. And me racing there meant taking a place (a dream) to someone more apt than me to start.

    Q35 When are you going to run for UCI president? SLOW RIDER & AG

    when my kid is older so that I can move to Switzerland to live

    Q36 Are you a cyclocross fan / follower? If so, who is your bet for the world championships? SLOW RIDER

    not really.  a belgian rider ??

    Q37 Do you think you will be given an opportunity to take charge of the italian national team?   Is your outspoken anti-doping stance a factor in whether or not you would be considered? -AG

    This question should be asked to people that decide. I can only say in the future I’d consider the option seriously

    Q38 Do you think race radio's should be allowed? - AG

    yes.

    Thanks Marco for the interview and time and good luck with the newish career and future JSG c/o Velorooms
  • ReplyReply
  • « Last Edit: January 14, 2015, 22:36 by froome19, Reason: In process of cleaning up ;) »

    search

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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #22 on: January 14, 2015, 11:47 »
    Thanks a lot for organizing it, jsg, and also to Marco of course, for answering so many question. Very interesting, indeed
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  • Capt_Cavman

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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #23 on: January 14, 2015, 12:12 »
    Wow, I wasn't expecting such a comprehensive set of answers. Many thanks to JSG and of course, MP.
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  • AG

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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #24 on: January 14, 2015, 12:18 »
    Thanks so much Marco.


    Best wishes for your future - with BMC and beyond.



    and thanks heaps to JSG for all his work in this.  It is great to be able to have things like this happening on our forum   :cool
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  • L'arri

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    Re: Q & A Marco Pinotti
    « Reply #25 on: January 14, 2015, 13:21 »
    Looking forward to the follow-up already!  :P

    Thanks, Marco and JSG!
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