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Claudio Cappuccino

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Your finest cycling moments in video or pictures
« on: June 06, 2015, 11:45 »
It is pretty simple, what is/are your best cycling moment(s)? When where you jumping up and down the couch from excitement?

I'll put up a few of mine first:

1: Tour de France 1984 stage 18 Le Bourg-d'Oisans – La Plagne

After 'stealing' - at that time it feld like that for the young Claudio Cappuccino - the 1983 Tour de France from Pascal Simon who heroicly rode till 'his death' with a broken collarbone Laurent Fignon absolutely destroyed the peloton with an unseen vengiance after he had been robbed from the Giro win by a very good Francesco Moser and his splendid preparatore.

This stage is so awesome with a capital A.


Here he just rides away:
https://youtu.be/FTg4fgZIjgI?t=773

Still, just WOW! Mind you, this stage was over the Galibier, and Madeleine too. To top things off Grand Fignon won another mountainstage and the second ITT after having allready won the first ITT as well as the TTT with the Renault - Elf Team.

(The climb to la Plagne will feature more in this topic, you can be sure of that.)



time on la Plagne:
52.41

R.I.P. Hero.


2: 1987 Paris - Roubaix

An absolute cracker victory by Eric Vanderaerden, closing a gap off about a minute and sprinting to victory here, I am stealing here from the excellent Echoes bio on Eric:
http://velorooms.com/index.php?topic=6647.0

Quote
In Paris-Roubaix 4 Belgian journeymen had a shot at victory: Versluys, Dhaenens, Lieckens and Vandenbrande. In the group with the top favourites they all were giving a sharp eye each other because of the fierce rivalry between Vanderaerden and Kelly. So when Van Hooydonck he could hear a rider say “let him go!”And indeed he would remain “en chasse-patate” for the rest of the race. Only on the Carrefour de l’Arbre Kelly and Van der Poel crashed, which benefitted Vanderaerden<. First Eric caught Lieckens from the lead group who had crashed with Dhaenens and was exhausted. Then Vanderaerden joined Edwig. Vanderaerden would later tell Michel Wuyts (in 2010): “Edwig was the type of rider that could keep the same pace the whole day but I had the acceleration in my legs.” Planckaert would say: “Van Hooydonck was a flat iron. He phoned hundreds of meters in advance when he attacked.” So when he joined him, he accelerated straight and dropped him. In the streets of Paris-Roubaix Vanderaerden joined the 3 leaders, so that a surprise win was avoided. There was a controversy round his win because you could clearly saw him talk with his break mates, who eventually did not even sprint. Vanderaerden denied any financial arrangement but he encouraged to ride along “because Van Hooydonck and Kelly weren’t far away”, he said, which he admits was poker because he did not know what was going on behind.

Eric’s only regret about this victory is that it was not on the Velodrome. Between 1986 and 1988, the organizers decided to move the finish line in a street of Roubaix: the “Rue des Nations-Unies” (what a name for a tradition breaking operation!) because it was where the mail order selling company “La Redoute” - co-sponsor of the race – had its registered office. Publicity is the enemy! The irony being that in the meantime the amateur Paris-Roubaix still ended on the velodrome. In September 1988, Jean-Marie Leblanc wrote an article in L’Équipe (he was a journalist then, and not ASO’s President yet) headlined “The Nostalgy of the Velodrome”, pleading for a return of the track. He’s been listened to (source: “Paris-Roubaix, une journée en enfer”, L’Équipe 2006)



Sorry for the abismall commentary there.

3: 1989 Tour de France Versailles – Paris (Champs-Élysées) ITT

The mother of all the drama cycling can be. A hardfought batlle between the two former teammates Fignon and Lemond culminating at this short TT in Paris. Fignon had let LeMond win the last mountainstage and was so overconfident of his third to be Tour de France win - after his brilliant Giro win earlier that year - he didnt even bother to put on an aero helmet, he wanted to show his ponytail to his fellow Parisiens. Well, we all know what happened there.



Yet, Fignon actually rode the TT of his life and would have beaten LeMond if he would have used the tri bars himself:
http://www.cycling-inform.com/time-trialing-how-to-get-free-speed-from-your-cycling-equipment
Quote
A November 1989 Bicycling Magazine article, supported by wind-tunnel data, estimated that LeMond may have gained 1 minute on Fignon through the use of the new aerobars. He also could have gained 16 seconds by wearing his aero helmet with a slightly elongated tail section for better aerodynamics, while Fignon rode bare-headed with his ponytail exposed to the wind. Fignon did perhaps gain a 5-second advantage by using a disk front wheel, while LeMond used a 24-spoke bladed radially spoked front wheel. Fignon finished third in the final time trial with an average speed of 53.59 kilometres per hour (33.30 mph)…

That, the first TT and his crutch injury (no uierzalf?) makes the sum not very difficult make who was the better in 1989.




Still the best Tour I have ever seen.



4: Tour de France 1990 Blagnac – Luz Ardiden

This is the year (dont forget the Giro) where my new hero burst into the scene, out of nothing basicly, my friend Claudio Cappuccino
http://articles.latimes.com/1990-07-20/sports/sp-363_1_southern-france

The year before this little hero came in at the 81th place in the Tour, in 1990 he was so close winning it. Okay, he gained 10 minutes on stage 1 but without that he would still be in the top ten on GC, in front of Hampsten, Philipot, Delion and many other more talented riders. The Italian/Spanish Renaissance.

I have stolen the race summary from
http://www.bikeraceinfo.com/tdf/tdf1990.html#story
because I am getting lazy by now.
Quote
Stage 16 to Luz Ardiden with the Aspin and the Tourmalet in the middle decided the Tour and showed that both LeMond and Chiappucci were athletes worthy of admiration.

Chiappucci decided on a gigantic roll of the dice. He couldn't let LeMond and Breukink continue to ride their race, forcing him to give up time each stage. He attacked as soon as the race hit the first major climb, the Aspin, taking 6 others with him. Again Chiappucci was stuck, being forced to do all the work. He took off and was first over the summit, 34 seconds ahead of the first group. Chiappucci pressed on and by the time he was halfway up the Tourmalet he had extended his lead to 3 minutes, 20 seconds. LeMond grew alarmed. If Chiappucci held this much lead by the end of the day he would probably be able to withstand any assault LeMond could mount with only 1 mountain stage and 1 time trial left.

LeMond dropped all but Delgado and Indurain as he attacked to get back on terms with the small, tough Italian. By distancing himself from Breukink at this point, he potentially eliminated his only other real threat.

LeMond did a kamikaze descent, making up a whole minute, and closed the gap to Chiappucci. There was now a small group in the lead that included Indurain, Fabio Parra and Marino Lejarreta. On the final climb to Luz Ardiden, after riding hard at the front as long as he could, Chiappucci had to surrender when Fabio Parra attacked. LeMond and Indurain were among the small group who went with Parra. Near the finish Indurain attacked and LeMond had to let him go.

Indurain won the stage with LeMond only 6 seconds back. Chiappucci came in fourteenth, 2 minutes, 25 seconds behind Indurain. That left Chiappucci with only a 5-second lead, a very slim hold on the Yellow Jersey with a time trial coming up.



https://youtu.be/XHM-HMnw-bw?t=1346

time on Luz Ardiden:
39.46



More to come...





 
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  • « Last Edit: June 06, 2015, 17:52 by Claudio Cappuccino »

    L'arri

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    My favourite photos taken by me:

    The later very dopey Bo Hamburger as a neo-pro in the 1991 Tour of Britain:



    A rare photo of Robert Millar on clipless pedals, 1992 Leeds Classic:



    Same race, this one's for you, Claudio! (plus the pre-Conconi Fondriest in his last season at Panasonic)



    Here you can see the blood and spit, but no tears yet: Wes Sulzberger at Omloop Het Nieuwsblad 2010:



    Y'all have seen this already, Stannard in his breakthrough race, the apocalyptic KBK 2010:



    Why they should bring back the Muur, Ronde 2010:




    Waking up a wintry Flanders, OHN 2012...



    ... and 2013:



    That awesome edition of OHN in 2014:




    When you gotta run, you gotta run, OHN Ladies 2015:



    Heavy artillery, OHN 2015:



    All-star cast, LBL 2015:

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  • Cycling is a Europe thing only and I only watch from Omloop on cause I am cool and sh*t
    RIP Craig1985 / Craig Walsh
    RIP KeithJamesMc / Keith McMahon / Larry Sarni

    Drummer Boy

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    There was that one time when I...

    Oh. You meant as a fan:flustered

    This one wasn't bad.
    July 20, 2006






    [What's with all the typos in the OP?]
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  • Flo

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    RIP Keith
    RIP krebs

    L'arri

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    [Tirreno 2014, 5th Stage]

    Great ride, that. One of the bravest AC performances I have ever seen. :cool
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  • L'arri

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    Perennial favourite:

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  • Claudio Cappuccino

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    5: Paris - Roubaix 1993





    The old fox, le tricheur, almost begging Franco Ballerini to take him to the finishline, spend he was, spend. Twice already the old fox came in second in Roubaix, won the year before. Surely he couldnt do that again at the age of 38.7? Well, uh, he did:


    A dusty, dusty edition of Roubaix, great race, great winner, great runner up, who later went on to win to editions of Roubaix as well.





    Ciao a tutti, RIP warrior.


    6: la Fleche Wallone 1994

    The day cycling lost its virginity for the grand public. Does this one need any more explanation?


    See Cappuccino suffer there:


    Pandora's Box opened that day.


    7: Giro d'Italia 1994 Merano - Aprica

    Couldnt see this one live but this day is the day the loyal lieutenant of Cappuccino showed the world what he was capable of. Forget the day before to Merano, this was a stage over the Stelvio and Mortirolo, hard men's labour. See Franco Vona - a year before the surprise on the Sestriere stage in the Tour, where he outclimbed Big Mig - struggle on that Mortirolo, unhuman, beastly climb, see uncle Bjarne work for Yevgeni, and then:

    UNLEASHED

    right at this time:

    https://youtu.be/wNdkpEvXE-g?t=374

    The Magical Mortirolo, the climb that made Pantani who he became, the greatest mystical climber of his generation.



    climbing time:
    43.50





    RIP poor fellow



    8: Tour de France 1994 Cahors to Hautacam


    A special one for me. My diseased mum and dad bragged about it for months, and afterwards, they were going to be there for that stage on their holiday. It was the first time the Tour went to Lourdes, the village of wonders. And, a wonder happened. Big Mig found his inner God and destroyed everyone par Luc Leblanc and made the rest of the peloton cry like little schoolgirls. Incredible stuff.



    Climbing time:
    35.24

    My hate for Mig grew and grew on that day.

    Big Mig going for it:
    https://youtu.be/gAx5JVW7iis?t=1025




    More to come....
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  • « Last Edit: June 07, 2015, 14:12 by Claudio Cappuccino »

    Kiwirider

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    For me I'd put in:

    Roche's triple crown:
    Best way to show that is his interview from 1988:




    For me, his humility, the adversity that he faced - in particular in the Giro, his tenacity and the fact that his success came towards the end of the age of relative innocence in cycling that will never be regained all make it very special.
    (And please note that I say "relative innocence". I know that there were drugs and corruption then - but relatively speaking to what followed and what persists today they were "innocent" times.)

    1989 Tour de France:
    Not for LeMond's victory - which I actually think ended up doing more damage to men's road cycling than good - but for the way that Fignon animated the race. I think especially of his attack on "le 16 juillet" (Bastille Day) and on stage 19 to Villard-de-Lans when he attacked the other leaders on his own and gained time.




    Mountain Bike World Cup XC - Mont Sainte-Anne 2012:
    We were there watching the races and the standout was the Junior men and U-23 women - which were won by Anton Cooper and Samara Sheppard (both Kiwis, in case anyone couldn't guess  ;) ) The weekend marked something of a coming of age for Cooper in particular. He was 16 and his time would've had him top 10 amongst the men. He went on to win at Windham shortly after, and then claimed the Junior World Champs jersey later that year. The kid (OK, so he's now 18) is pure class ... and will hopefully one day be NZ's first XC world champ.

    I have some photos somewhere, but not sure where ... so you'll just have to imagine them.  :s :s

    Cyclocross World Championships 1991

    This was the first time that I'd seen cyclocross in any form - and sadly was only on video - but it started the love affair that I have with the sport ... Frischknecht in the amateur race was the highlight ...





    That'll do for now ...

     :D
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  • Drummer Boy

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    1989 Tour de France:
    Not for LeMond's victory - which I actually think ended up doing more damage to men's road cycling than good
    Elaborate, please.  :)


    This one still gets me out of my chair.

    Phil & Paul actually don't embarrass themselves either. One of their better moments too.  :shh
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  • Claudio Cappuccino

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    9: Giro d'Italia 1988 Stage 14, Chiesa Valmalenco - Bormio, The day the big men cried

    First of all, it was pretty special to be able to see this one live, Dutch tv never broadcasted anything about the Giro, I dont even recall any highlights, but young Dutch upcoming man Breuking was doing very well, so that must have been the reason. This stage was so epic, Gent Wevelgem this year doesnt even come close.

    I'll let Hampsten do the talking:
    Quote
    June 5th 1988: The Day the Strong Men Cried

    Below is a great account of the Gavia Pass stage of the 1988 Giro `d Italia by stage + GC (overall) winner, Andy Hampsten. His performance on the Gavia that day might be one of the greatest ever by an American in any European Grand Tour. Andy was a humble, North Dakota everyman capable of suffering to depths few could. His account describes weather reminiscent of the early days of `08 Divide Racing. Andy was Divide Racing material, to be sure.

    By Andy Hampsten

    From the start of the Giro, I knew the Gavia Pass was going to be the key stage. The 1966 winner of the Giro, Italian Gianni Motta had befriended our team and throughout the early stages of the Giro he kept telling me "Andy, the Gavia is your stage to take the pink jersey". It was really cool that an Italian was so supportive of an American and an American team trying to win his national race.

    We knew that the conditions were going to be pretty bad on the Gavia Pass. The morning of the stage, the race director held a meeting with all the team managers and he told them that it was snowing on top of the pass but the road was clear. Armed with that information, our support personnel scoured the shops in Sondrio, where we were staying and bought all the warm gloves and wool hats they could find. Each rider was then asked to pack a special mussette bag which was to be handed to the rider 1/2mi before the summit of the pass. All our warmest clothes including the hats and gloves went into the bag.

    The stage had two climbs, the relatively minor Passo Aprica, a 2000 foot climb followed by a 1500 foot descent then a long, gradual 2000 foot ascent up a valley to the 4500 foot, 10 mile climb over the Gavia Pass (8599 ft above sea level) followed by a 15 mile, 4500 foot descent into Bormio and the stage finish.

    Things started to look grim on the descent of the Aprica. I was wearing tons of clothes, but the rain had been coming down in buckets from the start of the stage and I was shaking badly from the wet and cold. In the valley going up to the base of the Gavia I was upset because this was going to be my big day and it appeared that it was not going to happen. Slowly, I began to accept that it was going to be bad and that it was going to be bad for everyone else. I convinced myself that I should just stick to the plan that we had hatched weeks before. I had a good relationship with my coach, Mike Neel, and I trusted him. In 1985, my first Giro, he and I had driven the route of my first stage win in the morning before the stage started. Mike had shown me the exact spot to make my attack and I went on to win the stage.

    I realized that I had to go 100% on the attack and hold nothing back. I had about 10 kilos of wet clothing from the weather, but I had to get rid of everything. I dumped my leg warmers and 2 extra jerseys. I was down to shoes and socks, shorts, 1 undershirt, a thin ong-sleeve polypro top and clear Oakleys. I was wearing the "performance" jersey which is the rider with the best combined point totals in sprints, climbing and overall classification made of pretty thick wool, which was nice! My biggest asset was that I kept my neoprene gloves. I realized that I had to keep my hands warm or I couldn't function.

    Going up the valley, the "boys" (i.e. my teammates) were doing everything they possibly could for me; bringing me hot tea every 5 minutes; taking my clothes, etc. I was not sure how much I would have to suffer, but I felt that we were all going to have to go to a new limit to get over the pass. I knew I could suffer, but I also knew it would be very hard for my teammates so I was trying to psyche them up as well. I remember telling Bob Roll that this would probably be the hardest day on the bike in our lives.

    At the bottom of the climb, the Del Tongo team was at the front riding tempo for their race leader, Chioccioli, but, everybody knew I was going to attack. When the road steepened, I went to the front and all the climbers marked my wheel. I could hear them muttering "Hampsten is going to attack" and trying to discourage me. At this point the road was still paved, but when I came around a left-hand switchback and saw the road turn to dirt and the 16% sign, I punched it. I was definitely playing head games. I wanted the other riders to be afraid of both my strength and of the height of the climb. The other riders knew I was strong, I had won the mountain stage to Selvino two days before. I was putting my cards on the table now, so early on the climb, because on the valley approaching the Gavia, I had re-affirmed my commitment to attack on this day.

    I was prepared to attack multiple times, but I was relieved to see it break up so quickly into little groups. Zimmermann, Breukink, Chioccioli and Delgado were all chasing, but it was definitely breaking up. There was a small breakaway of minor riders up the road that was coming apart so I concentrated on picking off those riders. I was glad to finally be going hard again because I was still cold from the descent off the Aprica some 10 miles back.

    Because of all the rain, the dirt was really shaky. It was pretty soft, each tire left a groove mark. I had to use my 39x25 to make progress. I think I was more comfortable on the dirt than everyone else; I trained a lot on dirt in Colorado and I had ridden a lot in the snow in Colorado and in winters in North Dakota, I had ridden my bike 3 miles each way to school in the snow.

    As I climbed higher and higher, my mind started wandering and the psychological aspects of what was happening started to creep into my mind. I felt that I had achieved my results, to date, without taking any shortcuts, but when it started getting bad, I thought about what I could do to make things better. I gave up on asking God for any help, I was blessed already having the privilege of racing, instead I speculated on what I would bargain for if the devil showed up. Demoralized by this chain of thought, I realized that at the beginning of the day, I had relied only on myself to get me through the stage. On the Gavia, as always, there where no shortcuts and I had never looked for help from pills or other aids, although I was in such a mental state that I doubt I would have resisted any temptation that delivered me to Bormio. I must rely on myself to see me through.

    At 4mi to go to the summit, my mind started going into a fog. I was going hard, but it was not like I was murdering anyone, Breukink was the closest behind at about 1 minute back. I started thinking about how cold I was now and the 15mi descent from the summit and the doubts started creeping in..... were the team cars going to get through? Would the soigneur be there at 2.5 mi to go with hot tea? Would Och be there at 1km to go with my bag? What would I do when I got my bag? I realized that if I stopped to put something on, I probably wouldn't keep going, so I decided to just take the bag and keep riding.

    About 3mi from the top, I went to put on a wool hat but decided first to brush the water out of my hair, but my hand went 'thunk' on a huge snowball that fell onto my back.

    I got a bottle of hot tea from our soigneur ET at the point of the climb that was carved out of the ountain-side, which is about 2.5 miles below the summit. I tried to hug the mountainside and get a moment of shelter but the spectators where more determined to shelter themselves than move. At 1mi to go, the wind picked up and the snow was blowing hard into my face.

    I was creating tracks in the snow from my tires, but the traction was OK. Now I really started thinking about the 15mi of descending and how cold I was and how much colder I could get.

    At 1/2mi to go, I took my special bag with a jacket and gloves from Och. The wind was blowing so hard that I could barely keep the bike going and put my jacket on, no-hands. In retrospect, I should have just stopped and put the jacket on since I lost 40-50 seconds to Breukink and he eventually caught me at the top, but if I had stopped, I may never have started again!

    When I saw the buildings I thought that was the top of the climb (it was!) and if I was going to stop, I should do so here. But I really wanted to race at that point. It wasn't survival yet.

    By the way it was snowing and the way the flakes were coming down, I figured the storm was coming from the north so I reckoned that the conditions would be much worse on the descent. Because of this, I didn't fly over the top but held back to save some energy for the descent.

    When Breukink caught me at the top, at first, I thought I would follow him on the descent but he was going so slowly when the descent started that I figured I should go in front and make my own mistakes. I learned later that Breukink never put on a jacket. Instead, his team manager, Peter Post followed him down the descent and kept him alert by yelling and cursing at him.

    I only had one gear for the descent, all the others had iced up and I kept thinking that I must keep pedaling to keep that one gear free of ice. The road at the top of the descent was gravel. It was better for descending than asphalt as it did not ice up. I tested it a couple of times to see if it was solid and it was. The spectators on the descent did not know if the race had been cancelled so they were wandering all over the road. On one turn, I almost hit a Carerra team mechanic holding a spare pair of wheels and walking down the middle of the road. I remember he was wearing this beautiful gore-tex full body suit and I really wanted to have it on me!

    As I descended, I got colder and colder. I tried to shut out the cold and concentrate on the road ahead. It was asphalt now, but luckily it was not icy. I tried not to break too hard. When I used the brakes, first I had to break the ice from the rims, then scrape the water off before I got any stopping power.

    I was concerned about hypothermia and just how much colder I could get before I was no longer able to pedal the bike. My arms were basically locked up from the start of the descent, I just tried to keep pedaling to keep my legs moving. At one point, I looked down at my legs and through a layer of ice and lanolin grease, I could see that they were bright red. After that, I didn't look at my legs again.

    About 10km into the descent, Mike Neel in the team car caught up with me. There wasn't much he could do, the snow had turned to a cold rain, all I cared about was getting down to a place which was warm and I could stop.

    At about 6km to go, Breukink caught me, but I was totally blocked and could not respond. Breukink had no rain jacket on, just a jersey, so he could descend faster on the long straight drop into Bormio. There was no bloody way I was going to take my jacket off.

    After I crossed the finish line, I headed straight for our our soigneur, Julie. I was in such a rage trying to get down the mountain in one piece that when our team doctor, Max Testa, came up behind me and tried to put his jacket around me, I didn't realize who it was and since he was keeping me from Julie and my warm clothes, I started punching him. Mike Neel came over and straightened me out and got me in the team car, which was running it's heater full blast! When I started to warm up the pain started to come back. Mike then told me I had the jersey and the pain and the euphoria swept over me and I just started crying, laughing and shaking. A whole wave of emotions covering the rage to finish the stage to the realization that I would survive me a brief and refreshing emotional meltdown.

    Within 10 minutes of the finish, I was up on the podium. The pink jersey felt good. I slipped it on and all my doubts went away. The TV interviews began and I remember saying "Incredible, I have never seen conditions like this, even in Colorado. Today it was not sport, it was something beyond sport."

    Everyone who made it over the Gavia that day was a winner. Even to this day, there is a clique of riders whose bond is that they rode over the Gavia that day.

    On this unforgettable day, which La Gazzetta dello Sport dubbed "The day the big men cried," conditions were so extreme, and time gaps so massive, that organizers did away with the time limit and allowed all who finished to remain classified.





    Johan van de Velde, without any protection, he will pay for it later on...


    Perico after the finish.


    Hampsten


    10: Liège–Bastogne–Liège 1997

    Michele Bartoli making two of the best riders of the world look like schoolboys. Zulle and Jalabert trying to loose the Italian but time after time Bartoli reacts and in the end just rides away on Ans.



    How the race was won is probably another story but boy, that was something special.


    The decisive moment.

    So sorry for Jaja...

     :s


    11: Tour de France 1995 Le Grand-Bornand – La Plagne

    There it is again, that climb to la Plagne. Some miracles have happened here.
    Situation: Big Mig has factually already won his 5th consecutive Tour de France with his coup d'etat stage to Liege - nobody believes Bjarne Riis to be a real contender, yet - so he lets Once in person of Alex Zulle take off, with about 100K to ride.
    On the bottom of la Plagne Zulle has around five minutes on Indurain, who stays tranquilo and just takes of when his time is there:
    https://youtu.be/TvHMSyxAfCw?t=1304

    What a show de force!



    Zulle still won the stage, Indurain put more than 2 minutes into the other GC candidates.

    Climbing time:
    Zulle 48.40
    Rocket Mig 45.40

     :S
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  • « Last Edit: June 07, 2015, 14:14 by Claudio Cappuccino »

    Kiwirider

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    Elaborate, please.  :)

    Sure ....  :)

    Lemond's victory brought two things to men's road cycling:
    - the idea of not racing a full season, but instead focusing on certain major events. This was a necessary consequence of his hunting accident, as his attempts the year prior to race a fuller season showed that he lacked the physical resources to be able to do so.
    - bringing big money into the sport. After the win, he became cycling's first "million dollar man" with a salary that was for the time enormous and was, more importantly, significantly greater than the salaries of the domestiques and roleurs (which I use to mean the second level riders, rather than the true sense of roleurs).

    As for how they are negative ...

    As I said in another post, to me the high salaries and the disparity that exists between stars and water carriers are the cause of much of the cheating (drugs, corruption - whatever form of cheating you want to list) that continue to plague men's road cycling. EPO is a symptom, million dollar salaries are the cause. As evidence, I offer the relative lack of cheating in those codes that lack the significant financial incentives that men's road does.

    As for the "periodization", I see that as negative for a number of reasons. The lack of a full season presence allows more opportunities for "preparation" for significant races. I know that there is non-race, random testing, but we all know that they aren't 100% effective. A rider who races all year round sets, by definition, a clear baseline so that any outliers in performance are easier to spot. That's not the case with a rider who shows up for June and July.

    By a like token, the focus on certain races has allowed the media and promoters to over-blow the importance of those races, to the detriment of the calendar as a whole. And yes, I am talking primarily about TdF and ASO. When I started watching cycling, certainly the TdF was a season highlight - but was basically on a par with the classics, the Giro and the Worlds in terms of the prestige of victory. (Hence the importance of the Triple Crown.) Now, it has been blown out of all proportion to the rest of the calendar. As a result, other races have suffered and have either folded or been brought into the ASO portfolio. The fact that we can have discussions about whether (or when??) ASO will own all three major tours is very scary ... and hugely negative for the sport.

    I think that periodization has also been largely responsible for creating a peloton that is basically prissy. Whining about racing in the cold and wet in spring is pathetic - and is only really possible if you know that you have the ability to not race for part of the year and still hold down a job. Put another way, could you ever imagine Sean Kelly whining about rain or snow on Turchino the way that the MSR peloton have done for the past few years?

    Oh, and I should say - I don't "blame" Lemond for this (not least because he hasn't wronged me in any way). He simply did what made sense for him and took advantage of the circumstances that presented themselves to him - as any rational individual would. I do however think that part of the reason for his continued outspokenness on the sport is because he feels some sort of responsibility as being the father of much of which followed ...

    ... or maybe that's just me being arrogant enough to think that Lemond would agree with me if we were to sit down and discuss this over a beer or two ...  ;)
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  • LukasCPH

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    Sure ....  :)

    Lemond's victory brought two things to men's road cycling:
    *snip*
    Can I like this half a dozen times, please? :cool :cool :cool
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  • Cyclingnews Women's Pro Cycling Correspondent
    2018 Synergy Baku Press Officer; 2017 0711|CYCLING PR Manager; 2016 Stölting Content Editor
    Views presented are my own. RIP Keith & Sean

    Claudio Cappuccino

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    @ Kiwirider:

    LeMonds's 1989 win didnt make him the first million dollar racer, he allready was that at PDM, 1988.

    edit: sorry, it were Dutch guilders..
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  • Kiwirider

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    @ Kiwirider:

    LeMonds's 1989 win didnt make him the first million dollar racer, he allready was that at PDM, 1988.

    edit: sorry, it were Dutch guilders..
    Yeah, it was his salary when he moved to Z in 1990 that cracked the magic million ...

    BTW - thanks for posting the stuff about the Gavia in the 1988 Giro. I'm embarrassed to admit that I forgot about it when I posted my fave's last night.
    That was the first grand tour that I followed - again sadly only in the media - and to me that day is legendary!! I love stories about pain, suffering and perseverance to achieve goals (that's part of why I started mountaineering) so that stage cemented my love of cycling. It is also one of the reasons why to me the Giro will always be a better race than the Tour.   :D

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  • Claudio Cappuccino

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    12: the 1987 Giro d'Italia

    Was this as good as the Tour de France 1986 where Hinault and LeMond fought a battle as teammates? Visentini was definitely not of the grandeur of Hinault but to attack an Italian teammate in Italy was pretty undone, still is.



    A downhill TT on the Poggio  :D

    The story:
    http://redkiteprayer.com/2012/06/the-story-of-the-1987-giro-ditalia/
    Quote
    Before the 1987 Giro started it was thought that this edition was going to be a battle between Roberto Visentini and Giambattista Baronchelli. This Giro was in fact contested by Visentini, the 1986 Giro champion, and Stephen Roche, both members of Boifava’s Carrera team. It is strange that such a vicious intra-team rivalry was allowed to occur just after the 1985–1986 La Vie Claire bloodletting between Greg LeMond and Bernard Hinault that made those Tours de France such soap operas.

    Roche had suffered his ups and downs. In 1981, not long after winning Paris–Nice, a blood disorder stalled his career. As he was starting to hit his stride, he crashed in the 1985 Paris Six-Day, badly injuring his knee. His 1986 was forgettable (probably not to the people paying his salary), prompting him to have knee surgery. The repaired Stephen Roche was a new man. In early 1987 he showed good form with firsts in the Tours of Valencia and Romandie and seconds in Liège–Bastogne–Liège and the Critérium International.

    Visentini was the returning Giro champion but had attained no notable successes that spring. Writer Beppe Conti observed that the two riders were much alike, terrific in time trials and on the climbs and both difficult to manage. Roche in particular didn’t get along with his directors and he didn’t get along with Visentini. Visentini reciprocated the Irishman’s dislike.

    The official line from the team was that Carrera had two leaders and that team support would go to the rider most worthy of help. As far as Visentini was concerned, the team had only one leader and that was Roberto. Roche was resentful of what he saw as a loaded deck of cards. He was supposed to be available to support Visentini, but during that spring, Visentini had never turned a pedal to help Roche. Roche felt this arrangement was unfair because he was riding wonderfully well, bringing in high-value wins and placings for Carrera while Visentini so far had nothing to show for the season.

    Visentini argued that Roche was focusing on the Tour and that he would be happy to help Roche win in France in July. But…Visentini had already booked a July vacation and Roche knew it. Roche had no plans to sacrifice his own chances to help a man who refused to reciprocate. Furthermore, Visentini hated riding the Tour.

    The air was poisonous even before the race began. Visentini let it be known that if necessary to win the Giro, he would attack Roche. Now let’s be fair. Visentini was the reigning Giro champion returning to defend his title and fully expected to have a unified team help him. He certainly had every right to that expectation. The failing was Carrera’s in creating this dilemma.

    Roche was almost completely isolated on the team, having his dedicated Belgian friend and gregario Eddy Schepers and mechanic Patrick Valcke as his only trustworthy support.

    Visentini drew the first blood by winning the 4-kilometer prologue in San Remo. The next day Erik Breukink won the 31-kilometer half-stage, a ride from San Remo up to San Romolo, beating the pack by 19 seconds. Breukink was now in pink. That afternoon Roche won the 8-kilometer downhill San Remo time trial, beating Breukink by 6 seconds and Visentini by 7. Breukink remained the leader with a 14-second lead over Roche.

    The Giro headed south via the Ligurian coast. At Lido di Camaiore, the Carrera team showed that they had the most horsepower when they won the 43-kilometer team time trial, beating second-place Del Tongo by 54 seconds. Baronchelli crashed near the end of the event, finishing well after his team, putting him out of contention.

    After stage three the General Classification stood thus:

    1. Stephen Roche

    2. Roberto Visentini @ 15 seconds

    3. Davide Cassani @ 52 seconds

    4. Erik Breukink @ 53 seconds

    The race continued its southward march with Roche in the lead. According to Roche, rather than acting as a loyal teammate, Visentini just rode on Roche’s wheel, highlighting the adversarial relationship. In the rush to Montalcino in Tuscany, the Irishman was able to pad his lead a little, to 32 seconds.

    By stage nine, the race had reached its southernmost point, Bari, and still it was Roche in the lead with Visentini at 32 seconds. Scottish climbing ace Robert Millar, riding for Panasonic, with Breukink and Phil Anderson for teammates, had been first over the majority of the rated climbs, earning him the green climber’s jersey.

    In three leaps the race made it to Rimini on the Adriatic coast for the first big event in the drama, an individual time trial up Monte Titano to San Marino. Visentini won the 46-kilometer event and took the lead. Roche’s ride was dreadful. Blaming race jitters and a crash three days before, he came in twelfth, losing 2 minutes 47 seconds.

    The new General Classification:

    1. Roberto Visentini

    2. Stephen Roche @ 2 minutes 42 seconds

    3. Tony Rominger @ 3 minutes 12 seconds

    4. Erik Breukink @ 3 minutes 30 seconds

    5. Robert Millar @ 4 minutes 55 seconds

    At this point everyone except Roche and Eddy Schepers thought the Carrera family fight, if not the Giro itself, was over. Visentini again announced that he would work for Roche in the Tour de France.

    Roche, an intensely driven man, was burning with indignation and ambition and with Schepers he planned his revolt. They picked stage fifteen to put their plan into action, the first mountain stage with its three major ascents: Monte Rest, Sella Valcalda and a finish at the top of the Cima Sappada.

    The story of the Sappada stage is one of the most famous in the modern history of the Giro. An aggressive descent of Monte Rest allowed Roche to separate himself from the pack, taking along Ennio Salvador and Jean-Claude Bagot (whose loyalty had been purchased earlier when Schepers helped him win a stage). Boifava knew immediately what Roche was up to and was having none of it. He drove alongside the fleeing Irishman and told him to stop the attack. Roche refused, telling Boifava that if the other teams didn’t mount a chase, he would win the stage by ten minutes and Carrera would win the Giro. Boifava was unmoved and ordered the Carrera team to bridge up to Roche. The Carrera squad buried itself working to close the gap and Visentini, a high-strung rider, seemed to be having an off-day and suffered badly during the pursuit.

    The team chased like fiends, and finally, exhausted, they dropped out of the chase while Roche kept his escape going, leaving Visentini alone to try to salvage his jersey. Eventually a small group caught Roche, but Visentini was not among them. Phil Anderson and Jean-François Bernard were among those who did make the connection, then unsuccessfully tried to get away.

    Johan Van der Velde won the stage with Roche in the second chase group, 46 seconds behind. A broken Visentini came in 58th, 6 minutes 50 seconds after Van der Velde. Roche now had a slender 5-second lead over neo-pro Tony Rominger while Visentini was sitting in seventh place, 3 minutes 12 seconds down.

    All Italy erupted with fury. The Italian papers blared what they believed was Roche’s betrayal of a teammate who was in pink and who had deserved the unstinting support of all members of the Carrera team. Moreover, Roche had been insubordinate. He had been given a direct order by his director to stop the break and Roche had refused. Carrera management was furious and threatened to keep Roche out of the Tour if he insisted upon winning the Giro. That evening team director Boifava, beside himself with anger over Roche’s buccaneering, reminded Roche that before the stage, Carrera had a five-minute lead on Rominger, now they had only five seconds (thanks in no small part to Boifava’s chasing the Roche break).

    Visentini told the papers that someone (meaning Roche) was going home that evening and Boifava ordered Roche not to speak to the press. Roche ignored the command, feeling that if he didn’t speak, no one else would present his case.

    Roche’s taking the Pink Jersey so enraged the tifosi that Roche was given police protection. He even went on television to plead for sanity. He later wrote that he was frightened as the fans spit on him and even hit him. Because of the inflamed passions, that day after the Sappada stage is called the “Marmolada Massacre”. It had five big climbs, the final one being the Marmolada, also called the Passo Fedaia. Visentini tried to get away, but Roche marked his every move. While Roche was obviously protecting his lead, another day of what appeared to the Italians of riding against his teammate cost Roche dearly in the eyes of the Italian fans. Second place Rominger lost time that day, but there was no other serious change to the standings.

    On the big climbs that followed the Sappada stage, Millar stayed with Roche, riding at his side to protect him from assault while Eddy Schepers did the same. Visentini tried to make Schepers crash, even boasting about his attempted mayhem. The feelings on both sides were raw.

    Stage seventeen was the last day in the Dolomites and again, the situation was unchanged. Heading to the Alps and the final time trial, the General Classification stood thus:

    1. Stephen Roche

    2. Erik Breukink @ 33 seconds

    3. Robert Millar @ 2 minutes 8 seconds

    4. Flavio Giupponi @ 2 minutes 45 seconds

    5. Marco Giovannetti @ 3 minutes 8 seconds

    6. Marino Lejarreta @ 3 minutes 12 seconds

    7. Roberto Visentini @ 3 minutes 24 seconds

    During this Carrera family fight, Torriani and the Giro management were reasonably impartial. Roche said the Giro boss whispered encouragement to him when they would meet. In any case, the incredible drama was selling papers and riveting everyone’s attention to his race. Torriani probably couldn’t believe his good fortune.

    The equilibrium remained over the Alpine climbs of stage nineteen and Roche’s slim lead held. It was the twenty-first stage to Pila that Roche showed he was deserving of the maglia rosa when he, Robert Millar and Marino Lejarreta broke clear and arrived in Pila over two minutes ahead of the first group of chasers. This moved Millar into second place. Visentini, suffering a terrible loss of morale, lost another six minutes.

    The 1987 Giro ended with a 32-kilometer time trial. Visentini didn’t start, having broken his wrist in a fall in the penultimate stage. Roche won it, cementing his ownership of the lead. While his Carrera team had been deeply divided, especially after Roche’s attack on the Sappada stage, the squad slowly came around to the fact that he would probably win the Giro and therefore yield a good payday for all of them. Roche says that in the final stages he had plenty of support from the team.

    But he didn’t get it from the tifosi. To this day the Italians speak bitterly of Roche’s betrayal of Visentini.

    Final 1987 Giro d’Italia General Classification:

    1. Stephen Roche (Carrera) 105 hours 39 minutes 40 seconds

    2. Robert Millar (Panasonic) @ 3 minutes 40 seconds

    3. Erik Breukink (Panasonic) @ 4 minutes 17 seconds

    4. Marino Lejarreta (Orbea-Caja Rural) @ 5 minutes 11 seconds

    5. Flavio Giupponi (Del Tongo-Colnago) @ 7 minutes 42 seconds

    Climbers’ Competition

    1. Robert Millar: (Panasonic) 97 points

    2. Jean-Claude Bagot (Fagor): 53

    3. Johan Van der Velde (Gis Gelati): 32

    Points Competition:

    1. Johan Van der Velde (Gis Gelati): 175 points

    2. Paolo Rosola (Gewiss-Bianchi): 171

    3. Stephen Roche (Carrera): 153

    Visentini began his racing career by going from one triumph to another, including being Amateur Italian Road Champion and Amateur World Time Trial Champion, his promise being fulfilled with his 1986 Giro win. After the Sappada stage he never again won an important race. He retired to run the family funeral home in 1990 and has had little contact with the cycling world ever since.

    Roche, on the other hand, had a brilliant 1987. For all of his trouble with Carrera, Roche, with grudging and equivocal support from his team, was the leader of their Tour de France contingent and raced to a brilliant win. He capped the Giro/Tour double with victory at the World Championships. He joined Merckx as the second rider in cycling history to win the Giro, Tour and World Championship in the same year.

    Early the next year he re-injured his knee and from that point he was never a contender for overall victory in Grand Tours. He won several important shorter stage races before retiring in 1993.

    The Judas Stage:


    And how about this stage, the next day, over Croce Comelico, Gardena, Sella, Pordoi, Marmolada?


    More on the 1987 Giro here:
    http://cyclinghistorybyfbs.blogspot.nl/2013/04/sappada-87-roche-and-visentini-famous.html
    http://www.podiumcafe.com/2011/6/6/2209374/Stephen-Roche


    13 & 14: Tour de France 1986 Bayonne - Pau



    The mother of all betrayals.



    [so funny those cycling books full of mistakes]


    Followed by the next day's stage Pau-Superbagnères



    Quote
    Stage 13 only got harder with 4 major climbs: the Tourmalet, the Aspin, the Peyresourde and the final Hors Category climb to Superbagnères. On the descent of the Tourmalet Hinault attacked and got away. At the bottom he had a lead of 1 minute, 43 seconds. Again LeMond was stuck, unable to race. He had to let the others do the chasing. By the bottom of the Aspin, the gap between Hinault and about 30 chasers was 2 minutes, 54 seconds.

    On the Peyresourde, Hinault started to show signs of fatigue. A much reduced chase group of Zimmermann, LeMond, Hampsten, Millar and Herrera had cut the lead to 25 seconds. On the descent of the Peyresourde, Hinault was caught.

    The final climb to the ski station of Superbagnères is 16 kilometers of Hors Category work. Hinault rode with the group that had caught him, totaling 9 riders. On the climb he attacked again and got away. Now it was just Hampsten, LeMond, Zimmermann, Millar and Herrera chasing and with 10 kilometers to go, Hinault was caught.

    With 7 kilometers to go Hampsten attacked and took LeMond with him. Hampsten pounded up the mountain for all he was worth, while LeMond still hesitated, sitting on Hampsten's wheel. Then, as Hampsten could no longer keep up the infernal pace, he yelled at LeMond to take off and win the stage. LeMond finally shed his hesitancy and raced up the mountain for a great stage win as Hinault was being passed by rider after rider further down the mountain. LeMond's gain on Hinault that day was 4 minutes, 39 seconds, almost the same amount of time he lost the day before. Hinault was in Yellow but LeMond had shown that he had the ability to win the Tour, sitting only 40 seconds behind the fading leader.



    Rooks:
    Quote
    Clavve, difficult name

     :D

    The rest is history...
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  • just some guy

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    Painted the mother in-laws kitchen roof and watched this



    there was still paint on the Kitchen TV when it broke, a couple of years later :D

    Sure it is recent but what a day to watch cycling
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  • « Last Edit: June 08, 2015, 11:18 by just some guy »
    Of course, if this turns out someday to be the industry standard integrated handlebar-computer-braking solution then I'll eat my kevlar-reinforced aerodynamic hat.

    Larri Nov 12, 2014

    Flo

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    @Claudio
    Why are all your finest cycling moments from 20+ years back?
    Really there was not a single moment since 1997 that was memorable?
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  • just some guy

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    Any time the 4 man 100 km TTT was on

    Olympics


    can´t find 1984


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  • Claudio Cappuccino

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    @Claudio
    Why are all your finest cycling moments from 20+ years back?
    Really there was not a single moment since 1997 that was memorable?
    Patience is a virtue...


    15: Paris Roubaix 1990

    The funniest man in cycling wins his most wanted race, just beating Steve Bauer in the sprint after a suicide attack just after the forest of Wallers. Insane.



    Eddy himself on the matter:





    Panasonic were so strong that day, almost Mapei-esque.



    for Flo

    16: Tour de France 2013 Montpellier – Albi

    The new golden boy of cycling Peto Sagan who toyed with everyone where and whenever the year before, still didnt have a win at this year's tour. Got beaten left right and centre in the sprints, even by Simon Gerrans. So? Solution? Get rid of the other sprinters so they cant beat ya. Sounds pretty simple. Just let your team put on the throttle. Even Jens's legs couldnt resist the power of Cannondale that day.

    A TTT of what? 120K?



    Quote
    While it was, as anticipated, a sprint finish, many of the marquee names were missing in the finale in Albi. Cannondale took to the front on the second climb of the day, the Col de la Croix de Mounis, and blew most of the fast men out of the back of the peloton. Despite the best efforts of their teams, they sat up after the final climb of the day, and Greipel and Mark Cavendish (Omega Pharma-QuickStep) crossed the line more than 14 minutes behind Sagan.



    Too bad I couldnt find the entire stage.



    17: Tour de France 2013 Tours - Saint-Amand-Montrond

    The echelon stage where Valverde got caught out due to a flat tire, no Aussie to help him out there. Great stuff, with the topping coming when Saxo ripped an extra echelon in the latter stages.



    Saxo:





    Teamwork.



    18: Tour de France 2013 Saint-Girons - Bagnères-de-Bigorre


    Mayhem, mayhem, mayhem.



    Cycling in its best imho.



    Cant find a better video helais.

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  • L'arri

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    I didn't much care for Haussler, a rider I didn't even know when he soloed to Stage 13 of the 2009 Tour de France, but this was the day I came back to cycling after ten years in the wilderness.

    I had just arrived in a small hotel room in Arles, southern France, and I turned on the TV for a moment, somewhat haphazardly. Haussler was alone in the peeing rain with about 40km to go and I was supposed to go check out the town but I didn't leave the room until Barbie had crossed the line.
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  • L'arri

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    Before Cannondale-Garmin, there was Novémail-Histor...

    The beginning of 1993 was a gloomy time for me. During the off-season, my favourite team Panasonic-Sportlife, and with it a decade of bad haircut excellence, had all but disappeared and I had seen my heroes Ludwig and Fondriest head off into the sunset to pursue a dopier dream in different kits.

    The fallout of an early 90s economic recession, which saw massive pelotonic shrinkage un peu partout, was one of cycling's strangest mergers: the Frencher-than-French temp agency RMO and the remnants of Peter Post's outfit starting over in this grave new world with two sponsors, paint brands Novémail and Histor, giving the whole mess, well, a new coat of paint.

    Quoi? Debonair French climbing talent mixing with Belgo-Dutch classics hardmen? Wat? How could a team harmonise such a clash of colours as Charly Mottet and Marc Sergeant, now that they were forced to brush together?

    Well, it couldn't, really. But before that became all too apparent, the young, ephedrine chugging sprinter Wilfried Nelissen whitewashed the field at Het Volk (then named for the now-defunct lefty rag that sponsored what is now the Omloop Het Nieuwsblad).


    And just look at who the limbering Limburger beat... Moncassin, Museeuw, Abdoujaparov and Zabel. And Moncassin might have won this (as if he ever won anything) if he, unlike the other more pro pros pictured here, had bothered to jettison that last bottle before the kite...

    By 1994, that which was obvious was written all over the walls and no amount of paint could hide it. And yet Nelissen managed to do a Stannard before Stannard, winning the same race again again.

     :P
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  • « Last Edit: June 08, 2015, 15:47 by L'arri »

    Claudio Cappuccino

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    19: Tour de France 2009 Marseille - La Grande-Motte

    Echelons, I seem to like them?





    https://youtu.be/LCR_gbofC4Y?t=884

    Bert caught napping, Armstrong taking 41 seconds and the rest of the Tour we were enjoyed by the battle that never was a real battle.



    ''There is no I in team Bert!"
    ''I'm on twitter, are u2 Bert?''
    ''Blablabert''
    ''Hope rides again Bert''

    All in all an entertaining Tour.



    Quote
    and no amount of paint could hide it.
    Now that was funny  :cool

    Wilfried 'Jerommeke'  will be a feature soon.
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  • just some guy

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    I didn't much care for Haussler, a rider I didn't even know when he soloed to Stage 13 of the 2009 Tour de France, but this was the day I came back to cycling after ten years in the wilderness.

    I had just arrived in a small hotel room in Arles, southern France, and I turned on the TV for a moment, somewhat haphazardly. Haussler was alone in the peeing rain with about 40km to go and I was supposed to go check out the town but I didn't leave the room until Barbie had crossed the line.

    A little of me died on the inside  :(
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  • just some guy

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    Critérium du Dauphiné  2004 the whole race

    Iban Mayo won the lot

    GC
    1   Iban Mayo
    2   Tyler Hamilton   
    3   Óscar Sevilla   
    4   Lance Armstrong
    5   Juan Miguel Mercado   
    6   José Enrique Gutiérrez   
    7   Michael Rasmussen   
    8   Levi Leipheimer
    9   Óscar Pereiro   
    10   Iñigo Landaluze

    Video really hard to come by


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  • Drummer Boy

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    Before Cannondale-Garmin, there was Novémail-Histor...
    I don't know about any of that, but that was some damn fine writing.  :cool   :D
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  • DB-Coop

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    I thought about posting this moment in this thread so many times now that I might as well get it over with, it is just that every time I go to find the picture I still get upset about what followed, but anyways...

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  • Claudio Cappuccino

    • National Champion
    • Country: nl
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    • Venga! Venga! Venga!
    20: Tour de France 1994 Lille to Armentières



    Allright, here we go. By this time I had lost a lot of intrest in de Tour which had - like Echoes uses to call it - become a Bore. Big Mig really killed it since 1991. Or should I say since the famous TT in Luxembourg in 1992 where he put the number 2 de las Cuevas on three minutes, leMond on four.

    Also, my favourite team, of all time btw, Team Post, was struggling to survive in this ever harder becoming peloton. 1992 was still a good year:



    with Olaf Ludwig, Mo Fondriest and the two up and coming young riders Wilfried Nelissen and Eddy Bouwmans.

    30 victories including a terrific win by Ludwig on the Champs Elyssees and yet main sponsor Panasonic stopped.

    On came Novemail - Histor, like Larry has put it here above:


    that shirt  :(



    Not that bad when one realizes what whas going on in the peloton at that time.

    In the middle of that a new favourite rider of mine was 'born': Wilfried ''Jerommeke'' Nelissen, the successor of King Eric Vanderaerden. Fearless sprinter was his profession.





    Good on the Belgian and French roads, and by 1994 he was ready to rock and roll in the Tour against the like of Jaja, Cipo and Svorada, untill that policeman came along:





    After this crash Jaja decided to become a stage racer, with some succes. Jerommeke kept on being a fearless sprinter untill that dreadfull Gent Wevelgem 1996:



    where his carreer ended, age 26  :(



    Still sad about this one.
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  • « Last Edit: June 14, 2015, 14:14 by Claudio Cappuccino »

     



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