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Poll

How much did your bike cost vs distance ridden on it so far? Cost ÷ miles (or KM)

Less than a pound, dollar, euro
Less than 5 pounds, 5 dollars, 5 euro's
Less than 10 £$€
Less than 30 £$€
Less than 50
Less than 100
Less than 300
Less than 500
Less than 1000
Less than 3000
*cough*
*splutter*
My chain cost 6000 quid, I used it for an hour.

hiero

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Oy, lemme see. Here, it all started here:

Wow, you're all so.. cyclingest.

What's wrong with spending a small or large fortune on a bike, hanging it on the wall and just staring at it?   ;)

To which I say: "Not my choice of action, but if it shakes somebody's tail to do that, no skin off my nose. Have at it."

But it got this response:
. . .

Post Merge: June 29, 2015, 23:20
No way! Bikes get sad when they are sitting on the wall gathering dust. They're supposed to be out doing what they were made for.

Which struck me as a bit more religious than I'd like to get over a machine - even though I do love the breed. Which is why I cringe just a little when I even see a big-box pile of junk on the junk heap. "If only there was a practical way to recycle them". But, recycling such is a real money pit - and they weren't even all that beautiful to begin with - it's not like finding a 1960's Paramount, or even a 2nd level Raleigh. (Switch up brand names to suit your own experience).

And this:
True, I get your point. But don't forget that bikes such as Hampsten's LandShark would have been raced harder than 99.9% of all bikes ever made. It got it's chance to LIVE!

When a top of the line bike is never ridden at all, I just can't help but die a little inside.  It's like using the latest model Ferrari to only go to the corner store, or never letting a prize thoroughbred leave the stables. Good race bikes have personalities, and each one should get a chance to express it.

I would have no qualms about using the hottest Ferrari to only go to the corner store - if I wanted a car just for name and looks. A thoroughbred is, imo, a bad example, since it is a living critter. The Ferrari is a good example. But that is a good reason I would never own a Ferrari (or any 50K + car) - the cost is way too high for the fun generated. Even if I had Bill Gates money, I would be unlikely to buy such a thing. Which also means I would not likely ever buy a bike just to hang on the wall. But, some people like to do such things. I can't see saying such a thing is WRONG - even though I know we are doing this somewhat tongue-in-cheek! ;)

And I like yer pov re Hampsten's #172 having had it's chance to live! Yes, it did! In fine fashion!
 
. . .

To come back to your example of Hampstens bike - or even better, since apparently it is regularly ridden today, one of Roche's triple crown bikes - you can guarantee that over 75% of that bike has been changed at various stages ...

Which makes me say "no" to Hiero and to say that, while I agree that there are bikes that are a thing of beauty, they are beautiful because of their functional form ... so use them as much as they are able to be. Subject to exceptional bikes where there is a historical significance in retiring them (eg., Coppi's Bianchi, complete with the dirt from the race), ride them until the small parts that keep them going are no longer available ... Then, and only then, should they become decorations ...

... or at least that's my point of view ...

 :D :D

Yeah - like the point about the beauty of a bicycle being integral to it's functional form - yup. Good point.

Lemme get back to the OP:
Wow, you're all so.. cyclingest.

What's wrong with spending a small or large fortune on a bike, hanging it on the wall and just staring at it?   ;)

Well, there ya go. Now we've seen a few reasons why someone might think it wrong, or at least misguided, to spend any amount on a bike to just hang it on a wall and just stare at it. I don't agree - if somebody wants to do that, no problems from me. I do hope they are riding their other bike, but whatever, eh?

So, GOOD reasons to hang a bike on a wall? Taking my cue from my cycling brethren in this thread: Historical significance - either technological or athletic performance related. Like Bob Howard's land speed record bike - I hope that is in a museum somewhere. Like Hampsten's Huffy-labeled Landshark. Lots of examples around. Or, if it was made strictly for looking at, and is technically not functional for some reason - that could be too. I could see swapping a working mtb for one of those wooden bike-like thingies you can find being made by folks in Africa who haven't the resources to afford or make something more practical. I could see putting one of those on display back in one of our respective locales - where technology is everyday, everywhere, and cheap. Back here it benefits us to remember what a man can make when living "the simple life". Or even the not so simple life - anybody take notice of the bicycle core of the man-powered helicopter I posted the vid of recently? Pretty ingenious device - and some hand-made parts as well! 

BTW - I've been having probs getting the preview to work - so I didn't proofread this. My apologies for any outright errors.
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  • « Last Edit: June 30, 2015, 20:13 by hiero »
    Ubi est ignis

    hiero

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    Oh, yeah, btw - ON TOPIC <<cough>> - I haven't the faintest idea how much my bikes have cost per mile any more. They've mostly gone too far, and over unrecorded mileages (and thus undetermined life span).

    I do know this - I still have a 1970's bike boom univega steel frame working as a single speed. That particular bike has, on the front, one of the first wheels I ever built. A 3-cross on a Normandy hub and a now unknown rim (approximately equivalent to Mavic alu quality). I would say 3-cross and 14g spokes was a little overkill - although that wheel was originally used for some Ld touring, on a custom steel touring bike with wraparound seatstays (I forget the frame-maker's name, but it was a relatively well known name). That would have been the mid 80's. The rear brother to this wheel was respoked at least once, until the rim failed due to age and stress.

    That bike gets ridden occasionally. The bike I ride most is a modest "cross-over" city bike type that only sees low mileage at any one time, but gets used thru wind, rain, snow, and hail. And sunshine. I gave it a spring cleaning this year - but I think the derailleurs went overly long without sufficient maintenance - they ain't workin' so good no more. But its not like the DuraAce on my old race steed (an alu frame that I don't really trust for serious mileage - too old).

    And we haven't even gotten to my commuting frame - which is sitting hanging in the backroom - waiting for a decent commute to happen in my life again. That is an even earlier steel Carlton frame made for Raleigh - sand-blasted and coated and refurbed w/ decent Shimano stuff.

    Cost per mile? Haven't the faintest! 

    Btw - the Univega single speed is my icon/avatar here.

    Cheers!
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  • « Last Edit: July 02, 2015, 00:27 by hiero, Reason: spelling fix »

    Sauna in Duvel

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    The Stephen Roche story is interesting and I didn't allude to it previously but...

    When he had his Battaglin refurbed he mentioned it on Eurosport 2 years ago I think,  he refered to a guy called Mark who did the work on it.

    Mark likes bikes! He has a *cough* small collection of, you know, a few bikes kicking around...

    There's a few pics missing but here is a link: http://www.retrobike.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=90743&p=659245#p659245

    If you are of a sensitive nature, it my be better to turn away now if bicycle pictures count as, well, filth. ;)

    Mr Roche signed one of his bikes too :)

    Edited to add: He doesn't intend to ride any of them. And I kind of agree there is space in the world for them all.

    Finally, it's not a serious thread per se. Joe Breeze has Breezer #1 in the Smithsonian, a used, Iconic bike that is probably priceless as 'the first' mountain bike we could recognise as being purpose built.

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  • « Last Edit: June 30, 2015, 20:41 by Sauna in Duvel »

    Sauna in Duvel

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    I also went to a talk with Michael Hutchinson, author of 'Faster'. He's an interesting man and quite dry humoured and self deprecating. He apparently picked up a Lotus 110 time trial bike for about 100 quid, which apparently split in half down the middle (which is how it was bonded).

    But he thought it was pretty fast and iconic, apart from the bit where it broke!
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  • Francois the Postman

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    Still got an old Raleigh that I got when I went to secondary school (and was bought with an eye of growing into it, or probably better phrased: onto it), which is still my steed of choice when I visit the home country. It's a bit tiny now, and I am probably more retro than the bike, but I wouldn't part with it for anything in the world. That one I am riding into the ground, or me into the grave, whatever comes first.

    My ma had a mild heart attack when she saw what her cheery "you will get a new bike for turning 12" promise set her back for. And if my dad hadn't fancied one for himself (triggering another attack in my ma's other heart...wait, lung?) I would never even have gotten near that part of the showroom, let alone walked out with one (two).

    But amazingly it is still going, and I stopped counting kms when I had managed to clock up enough of them to circumvent the earth assuming it had a dutch prologue stage profile and the bike was able to cross water.

    That was 20 over years ago. It has seen quite a few rides and cycling holidays since, so it's safe to put that one in the books as less than 1 Euro/km, less than 1 Eurocent even. Making it my ma's best investment in her lifetime.

    My dad's bike however only started to be used properly when my partner also needed a bike on our family trips and Euro cycling holidays. I doubt if he ever got close to clocking up a 1000km on his own. Making that bike her worst investment. Well, cough, it prob wasn't my dad's bike but my dad himself that turned out to be her worst investment, but at least you can divorce people, whilst divorcing a bike is like, uhm, you can't, because it is family, really.

    My pleasure ride here has also firmly dipped below the £1/mile mark, but I have got quite a few Grand Tour prologues to go before getting even near another technical trip around planet earth.
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  • Francois the Postman

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    BTW, historically important bikes don't go onto a home walls, they get pinned up in their own church. Ask any Italian. 

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/violentgrind/sets/72157602436988016
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  • Sauna in Duvel

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    P.s. Adrian Timmis bought back his TDF ANC  Peugeot bike and restored it. A pretty photogenic bike as you'd probably remember the Time Trial pics of him going through the sunflower fields on it with Campag rear disc wheel.
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  • Kiwirider

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    The Stephen Roche story is interesting and I didn't allude to it previously but...

    When he had his Battaglin refurbed he mentioned it on Eurosport 2 years ago I think,  he refered to a guy called Mark who did the work on it.

    Mark likes bikes! He has a *cough* small collection of, you know, a few bikes kicking around...

    There's a few pics missing but here is a link: http://www.retrobike.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=90743&p=659245#p659245

    Looks nice, but I have to say that I prefer the following images of Roche's bike   :D



    Definitely a thing of beauty, and a piece of history. I realise what I said a couple of posts back about historical bikes - and totally acknowledge FTP's post about the Madonna del Ghisallo - but that bike clearly deserves to still be in daily service!

    Given that I started serious cycling around 1986 and that my dream bike of the day was a steel framed bike with full Record (which I bought, for the princely sum of NZ$3000), seeing that bike being ridden like that actually makes me want to repaint my 653 frame (currently used, in a very stripped down form, as an indoor trainer bike), update the derailleurs and cranks to 10 speed - with the current downtube shifters - and get out on the roads on it ...   :D

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  • hiero

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    Looks nice, but I have to say that I prefer the following images of Roche's bike   :D

     . . .

    Pretty nice. Steel is always amazingly resilient and durable. However, I would never ride 30 year old tires. Afaik, after about 5 years, a tire is irretrievably aged and no longer quite safe, even under the best storage conditions. I know I just threw out a couple of 15 year+ old tires that were never ridden, and always stored in the dark - but the sidewalls on one were all crusty and gummy, and the tread rubber on the other gone quite hard. Not to be trusted, I think.

    But a nice vid! Fun.
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  • MathewVare

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    Ive done 10-15 on a number of occasions, but the most I ever did was 20lbs. Ive seen people cut more and can only imagine how much it sucked. I know I spent a few hours at the gym going in and out of the sauna the day of weigh ins
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