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Womens Cycling Round table
« on: November 26, 2015, 08:16 »
Similar in format to the Interview the interviewers Q & A we have asked a group of womens cycling commentators their views by asking 5 questions, by Commentators in this case people who are on social media discussing the ins and outs of womens´ cycling some are paid others do it for the Love. 

Question 1.
In Cookson's Manifesto, one of the main pledges was minimum wages in women's cycling, In a video via Sky news published on the 25th of November 2015 he hopped to 'have a minimum wage in 2 to 3 years', which will be approximately 5 years after being elected, we have the new womens' road commission, we have the expanded World Cup re branded as the Women's World Tour , but once you scratch the surface what has the UCI changed in Women's cycling? Where could the UCI take on a bigger role?

Question 2.
You have been given the keys to the Palace and have and can make 2 changes to Womens´cycling in 1 hour you can make 1 short term change ie to be implemented on the spot and 1 long term change ie to the implemented over the next 3 year to the way the UCI runs Womens cycling/or a change provided by the private sector what would you do?

Question 3.
The dinner party question! If you could have a dinner party with 5 people from the world of cycling past or present, who would they be and why? Doesn´t have to be Women´s cycling only but .....

Question 4.
Much of the promotion of Women's cycling comes from people like yourselves. What could "we" do better? How can The Social media sector/teams/sponsors/races promote women's cycling in a better way?

Question 5.
In 5 years’ time, what will be the biggest issue in women´s cycling? Who will be the riders  (female) – that we will be discussing as the stars of the sport?

The People are

Stuart Pickering aka Cycling Direct @CyclingDirectSA
I am a writer, photographer, author, journalist, editor and owner of the Cycling Direct news and information website based out of South Africa.
I am also a cyclist!  I wrote and published my book about my return to cycling at age of 50 (called Downhills are Your Friends).
I then realised I could write and enjoyed it so I started Cycling Direct to follow my passion four years ago.
In four years Cycling Direct has become one of Africa's biggest cycling news services and growing on a daily basis both in Africa and globally.

I saw how much I enjoyed women's cycling and how much support it needed. This was when I made a conscious decision to give women's racing as much of that support as I could.

Twitter: @CyclingDirectSA
www.cyclingdirect.co.za
www.flowerdewmedia.com


Stefan Wyman @ds_stef
Team Owner of Matrix Pro Cycling. A long association with women’s cycling, formerly from the business world, now combining the two. Spend my winters in the muddy fields of flanders.





Guy Elliot @guy_elliot
Guy Elliott joined SweetSpot in 2013 following a career in the international logistics industry where he was CEO for DHL Supply Chain Northern Europe.

Guy was instrumental, along with his SweetSpot colleagues,  in setting up The Aviva Women's Tour in Britain which this year ran for the second time and is now firmly established on the UCI Women's Calendar




Yolanda Álvarez aka @babelia1
(written by JSG )If you want Spanish cycling news then the one stop place for all is @babelia1





Karl Lima @Karl_Lima_Hitec
Bio;
Sex: Male
Born: 1964
Height: 175 cm
Weight: Super Welterweight
Profession: Technical Manager at Hitec Products, Team Manager for Team Hitec Products
Marital Status: Married to Tone
Children: 2 boys and a girl (from former marriage)
Sports: Football (Soccer), Boxing, Cycling, Chess (All mediocre)
Music: Hard Rock
Favorite Sport outside Cycling: Hockey!!!
Worst Ability: No patience


Sean aka @velofocus
( written by JSG ) Sean runs the Velofocus sight and does amazing race previews, many a team have been know to use his for the race bible as the maps are more accurate than the races. Velofocus is the website of choice for womens cycling calender's and race photo´s. I look forward to watching Where Sean takes his cycling based career with interest  http://velofocus.com/









Sarah Connolly aka @_pigeons_
Sarah Connolly runs a women's cycling website http://www.prowomenscycling.com which is the home of her podcasts, rider interviews, collections of race videos, guides to watching live cycling, and other things that catch her attention around the sport.  You might know her as http://www.twitter.com/_pigeons_  on twitter, where she can always be found talking about the sport, and occasionally popping up on the radio and in media publications.

Sarah has recently posted her 2015 articles on how the women's UCI cycling calendar has changed, and you can find that here:
http://prowomenscycling.com/tag/2016-calendar/

Her other social media homes are:
http://womenscycling.tumblr.com/
https://soundcloud.com/prowomenscycling

SuzeCY aka @festinagirl
Suze Clemitson writes about cycling for the Guardian Sports Network amongst other things. She is the author of P is for Peloton: An A-Z of Cycling (illustrated by renowned cycling artist Mark Fairhurst) and contributing editor of Ride the Revolution: the Inside Stories of Women in Cycling. She is currently working on a history of cycling in 100 objects and a novel based on the exploits of Marie Marvingt, the first woman to ride the entire route of the Tour de France.

P is for Peloton is available from Bloomsbury http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/p-is-for-peloton-9781472912855/ and Amazon http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/bestsellers/books/10193911/ref=sr_bs_1
Ride the Revolution is available from Bloomsbury http://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/ride-the-revolution-9781472912916/ and Amazon  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Ride-Revolution-Inside-Stories-Cycling-ebook/dp/B015D2C9UI/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1450195593&sr=1-1&keywords=ride+the+revolution

Jessi Braverman @JessiBraverman
Jessi Braverman has worked in cycling for nearly a decade – with a focus on women’s cycling. Following eight years working in-house for teams, Jessi made the move to focus on women’s cycling journalism, overseeing the launch of Ella CyclingTips. She recently founded Recon Communications, a cycling-specific communications agency, with cyclocross pro Meredith Miller. The duo’s flagship clients include an eclectic assortment of teams, riders, brand and publications – including Bicycling and CyclingNews. Follow Jessi on Twitter at @JessiBraverman (and give Meredith a follow, too, at @mmcyclist).



Thank you all for taking part, sorry for bugging some of you.
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  • « Last Edit: December 17, 2015, 13:11 by just some guy »
    Of course, if this turns out someday to be the industry standard integrated handlebar-computer-braking solution then I'll eat my kevlar-reinforced aerodynamic hat.

    Larri Nov 12, 2014

    just some guy

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    Re: Women´s Cycling Round table
    « Reply #1 on: December 15, 2015, 11:45 »
    Question 1.
    In Cookson's Manifesto, one of the main pledges was minimum wages in women's cycling, In a video via Sky news published on the 25th of November 2015 he hopped to 'have a minimum wage in 2 to 3 years', which will be approximately 5 years after being elected, we have the new womens' road commission, we have the expanded World Cup re branded as the Women's World Tour , but once you scratch the surface what has the UCI changed in Women's cycling? Where could the UCI take on a bigger role?


    Cycling Direct Stuart
    If you look at all my answers, sponsorship and the money into women's cycling is key to its future. I agree with Brian's minimum wage comments, now is not the time more money is needed in the sport first.
    The WWT is a great step forward as long as this 2016 base is grown upon in a way that can sustain the sport.
    The UCI need to look into the protection of women riders against the personal abuses that are sadly prevalent with urgency.
    Very little has really changed and what does the women's road commission do?  Are we seeing results, if there are they are failing to get that message across?
    We still need a proper U23 classification for the road as soon as possible, we now have it in CX so why not the road?


    Stefan Wyman
    I don’t feel there have been many real physical changes in women’s cycling since September 2013, certainly not that have been implemented by the UCI.  However that’s
    not for lack or discussion.  I’m sure that’s not what Mr Cookson hoped for when he was elected but it is the reality.

    Certainly over that period the top end of the sport has grown stronger with the might of teams like Wiggle Honda.  However that growth and strength of the top 8 or 10 teams has lead to the weakening of the bottom of the sport as the two halves are driven further and further apart.  That golf between the top and bottom is wider than ever and unless action is taken to ensure a strong future for both parts of the sport I fear for the depth of the sport. 

    A strong World Tour when it launches in 2017 is essential.  That’s the sports front end, what people will see and understand.  But that part of the sport needs a strong 2nd division. There needs to be competition for places for the World Tour very soon after it’s launched. Presently however, as far as I see it, no thought and time whatsoever has been put into the regulations and purpose of the 2nd division. 

    The sport has too many teams at the moment, too many weak and underfunded teams.  We have to be prepared for a time of change, with short-term difficulty for the long term good.  Strong decision-making is needed.  Introducing a Minimum salary takes a strong person, who will be drawing a line in the sand for every single female cyclist from that day forward. I haven’t been part of any debate on it, but I’ve seen a lot of random figure and debates batted around on news sites.  Personally, I’d have had the minimum salary coming in at the same time as the World Tour.  I feel that a World Tour without this is simply a change of name and removes some of the legitimacy it could have had. It removes its impact, which really disappoints me.


    Guy Elliot
    I think the Women's Road Commission is a great thing.  We now have a group of very knowledgeable and respected individuals taking balanced decisions for the long-term future of women's racing and getting the full and direct public support of the UCI President.  It it unrealistic to change everything in a day and I can see the validity of the argument "What has changed?" but I believe things ARE moving in the right direction.  There seems to be much more focus on changing women's cycling and a recognition right across the sport that everyone needs to get behind change.

    It would be easy for Brian Cookson, who I respect,  to say minimum wage standards are introduced from 2016 but that would simply mean the collapse of many teams. You often find the UCI being criticised for not doing this or that but the fact is that if only modest amounts of sponsorship are coming in, compared with men's sport, there's not a lot anyone can do and I would try and go back to the root causes and try and influence them.  I am not sure the minimum wage is the real issue anyway - over the years I have had several male riders seeking places on pro teams calling me to ask if I can help raise the money they need to pay the team to be allowed to ride. The women I speak to seem most interested in being treated with respect in terms of quality of race organisation, security of contract, actual payment of prize-money that has been earned, decent accommodation on the races, decent prize money (without necessarily being exactly the same as men's events), TV coverage and race safety. I agree it is great to have it as an aspiration but I would be very, very cautious about formalising it whilst everything else is evolving. 

    I would rather insist on men's World Tour teams creating women's teams as part of the conditions of being awarded a ProTour licence. I know there would be a lot of protests but commercial organisations all over the world are committing to, and sometimes being forced to commit to, far greater levels of diversity. 

    I think where the UCI could help, and it's a tough task, is to appoint some sort of Commercial Director focussed solely on bringing sponsorship into women's pro cycling.  It needs careful thought about exactly what that role would entail and where to target any inflow of funds but we know that many organisers are running on a shoestring - often with an organisational team of volunteers with full-time jobs - and I think this is the area I would like to explore in more detail.  I would also like to see the UCI drive through change with regard to race organisation of major tours which I discuss later.


    Yolanda Álvarez
    Up to now, Cookson's promises have been introduced too slowly. For years we have been promised that all World Cup races would be televised, and every season we see it not happening. Women are still the second course for UCI and plenty of times it seems as if women are a nuisance they have to deal with.

    Regarding UCI's social media, their contribution to women's cycling is most of the times ridiculously scarce. We fans are lucky that some organizers, teams and riders themselves invest time and money in that fundamental aspect


    Karl Lima
    There are positive signs and development every year. I dont expect giant leaps. UCI can help to get more TV coverage. If something annoyed me this year it was their (lack of) coverage  in China World Cup, yet they published an utter false report, wonder who wrote that piece of crap.

    Velofocus
    Women's cycling is definitely changing for the better and it feels like there is real momentum right now. It never happens as quickly as we'd all like, but it's important to bring people with you in the progression of the sport rather than force them out by implementing rules that can't be achieved by most today.

    The Women's WorldTour (WWT) hasn't even started yet but it's already starting to have a positive impact. Emakumeen Bira is a great example of this. It's a fantastic race but is very low key in terms of coverage. Following the announcement of races included in the WWT reports from Spain suggested that the race organisers were clearly disappointed about their race not being included. After the initial disappointment of not being selected they seem to be putting in place measures to help them be more likely to be included in the future: Moving the race in the calendar to avoid conflicts with other WWT events and securing TV coverage with a combination of highlights packages and some live broadcasts. Would that have happened without the introduction of the WWT? Probably not. It's encouraging races to be better and not be happy with the status quo.

    From my viewpoint, encouraging race organisers to not be content with the current situation, and breaking the thinking of 'well thats how we've always done it' is critical to the growth of women's cycling. The Women's Tour in the UK is an often used example but there are lower budget races that are doing great work, like the Ladies Tour of Norway. They're a relatively new race but are setting a standard others would do well to follow. They have a great social presence, a simple but effective website, live streaming of the races, making great efforts to engage fans at home and abroad and take on any feedback like a sponge. It's not perfect but they're looking to be better every year and that can only be a good thing.

    Well organised races that are easy to follow helps grow the fan base for women's cycling, which will eventually attract additional investment. With new investment there's more available for rider salaries and hopefully a minimum wage will become a non issue.


    Sarah Connolly
    This is a hard one to answer, as a lot of what they're working on is happening behind the scenes.  Personally, I think the Commission has been doing so much - the World Tour, the plans that are in place to change the team structure, some resolution of irritating difficulties that have been plaguing the sport.  I loved that immediately Cookson & Gaudry came in to the UCI, they got rid of the counter-productive average-age issues.  The World Tour is the biggest one, but the whole 2016 road calendar, for example, has solved a lot of the issues we complained about in previous years, and with the talk of more changes to be rolled out over the next few years, about adding another layer of teams and races etc, I feel really confident that things are going in the right direction.  (Want more

    And it's not just in road - I love the changes for women's cyclocross, for example, about lengthening races, and making race organisers take the women's racing seriously.  And on the track, extending the Team Pursuit to 4 riders & 4km for equality with the men (I'm hoping they'll change the IP, team sprint and 500m too).

    The biggest change, for me, has been how the UCI's moved into the 21st century, in terms of publicising the sport.  I love that we can now watch all the CX and MTB World Cups live, and there's the twitter and instagram and youtube clips to watch the races.  I love that they made a very easy win by taking road World Cups that were streaming live *somewhere* and adding them to the YT as well.  Of course I want bigger and better social media, but it's a huge change that helps all the stakeholders everywhere. 

    I do appreciate that lots of people want more change, faster, but I think their timescale has been very realistic for bringing stakeholders on board, and not completely freaking out the often-"traditional" cycling world.  I think the biggest change has been that the UCI is showing it CAN change, inviting opinions, involving women riders, and when they get things wrong (eg Paralympic track cycling) taking a long hard look, admitting it, and doing more. 

    Where can they take a bigger role?  Do more of what they're doing.  The pressing new thing, for me, is supporting riders when they're in dispute with teams etc - I hate that we're still hearing about riders not being paid contracted wages, and riders being mistreated (and hints of abuse).  I'd like to see the UCI clamp down publicly on teams - eg next time a team doesn't pay a rider, take the money out of the team bond, give it to the rider, and not let the team operate the next year.  I'd also like to see more done about the doctors, coaches etc who provide riders with drugs - especially the young, vulnerable riders.  Ban the riders, for sure, but when there are teenagers and young 20s riders especially, go after the suppliers super-hard, involve local law enforcement, and take that head off the monster for good.


    Suze Clemitson
    I'm reminded of my interview with Brian Cookson http://www.theguardian.com/sport/100-tours-100-tales/2014/oct/10/brian-cookson-interview-the-uci-president-discusses-womens-cycling on the subject of the minimum wage - he didn't seem unduly upset by the fact that he'd defaulted on his manifesto promise regarding the women's minimum wage. After talking to his VP Tracey Gaudry, I was persuaded of the validity of her approach - to raise the level of women's cycling, to professionalise it and to ensure that women were getting paid and to ensure their health and safety - but her job is akin to that of a captain at the helm of a supertanker. That she is frustrated by the slow pace of change speaks volumes. And this is where I think Cookson could be taking on a far greater leadership role - safeguarding women in the sport and ensuring men's teams either directly sponsor a women's team or take some kind of role in sharing advice and resources. Easy wins that he seems happy to turn a blind eye to.

    Jessi Braverman
    This question outlines the major changes that the UCI has implemented under Cookson. Could they have done more? Of course. Is this more than they’ve done in the past? Absolutely.

    I’ve heard riders talk about the fine line between being grateful for the change that’s happening and speaking up for the progress they are desperate to see happen more quickly than it is. At the risk of sounding too optimistic or naïve, I see a genuine commitment to change. I just don’t see it happening at the pace many of us would like. And I think that’s related to bureaucratic nonsense much more so than a lack of intent or will or caring.

    In saying that, I think the most pivotal role the UCI can play right now is threefold:
    1. increased standards that race organisations must meet before receiving UCI status – this applies to rider safety, doping controls, digital content, live race coverage, prize money, accommodation, etc.
    +increased communications with all relevant parties on the changes currently underway and the progress still to come – this includes riders, teams, race organisers, media and, to a certain degree, fans
    +embrace every opportunity for equality that doesn’t require a slow roll-out – example; this can range from broad initiatives like pre-season medical tests for all our female athletes (just like the male athletes are required to get) to smaller but equally important initiatives such as using “women” (rather than “girls”) when they would say “men” (rather than “boys”)
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  • « Last Edit: December 17, 2015, 10:07 by just some guy »

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    Re: Women´s Cycling Round table
    « Reply #2 on: December 15, 2015, 11:49 »
    Question 2.
    You have been given the keys to the Palace and have and can make 2 changes to Womens´cycling in 1 hour you can make 1 short term change ie to be implemented on the spot and 1 long term change ie to the implemented over the next 3 year to the way the UCI runs Womens cycling/or a change provided by the private sector what would you do?


    Cycling Direct Stuart
    Immediate change would be to make the UCI Women's Cycling media effective and provide much better coverage for sponsors, teams and riders alike.   There are plenty of us out there who know what can and needs to be done to create that effectiveness but the UCI seems reluctant to use our resources.
    Long term change would be to use the UCI global footprint to create proper long term sponsorship within women's cycling by offering proper benefits to potential sponsors.


    Stefan Wyman
    Based on my experiences of 2015 in the professional end of the sport, I’d immediately change the entry rules to UCI races, especially the lower lever ones, the .2 races.  These races have an essential role in our sport, but they are turning into a very odd circus which lack regulation as the sports develops.  There are too many teams, not enough focus on quality, far too many non-professional teams (Removing the legitimacy of being a UCI team in the first place), and not enough safety controls. 

    So my immediate change would be limit the number of club teams in UCI events, and remove national teams from any events from .1 upwards.  We need a sport which fans can relate to.  In Men’s cycling, that’s easy as you have your set of teams, and fans, media and commercial sponsors understand and relate to those participating in the events.   In women’s cycling, you can have 30 plus teams, and the following week, another totally different set of 30 plus teams; it’s no wonder people don’t understand our sport. 


    As for a long-term change, I’d like a lot of focus to be put onto the entry requirements for the World Tour.  With a clear balance between declared budget and UCI points being the deciding factor.  Part of this would also require a change in the rules to see points scored by a rider remaining with the team they were scored with to stop the ability to purchase a leading team over one winter.  I feel that everything over the next ten years for women’s cycling needs to be about creating a sustainable sport, with increased media and a vastly increased and more visible fan base.  Teams developing riders and then loosing them after being out-bid, should not loose their reward, which is the points they won. 

    I’d make this change as I feel if we can create a sport of true worth, the World Tour license of a team should be the item of value, the same as it is in men’s cycling. These licenses should be the trading commodity, not the rider points. 

    Eventually, if the sport can grow and develop in a sustainable fashion, I see no reason why we shouldn’t have a UCI Women’s Cycling President, as well as a Men’s President.  These should both be huge sports, and certainly the combined worth of the two elements will be much bigger than when the role of president was created.  Is it still fair to judge one person on their development of two sports, going in slightly different directions, covering a huge number of disciplines.



    Guy Elliot
    The short term change I would make is for a far greater degree of coordination of the women's race calendar.  It is impossible for a new race organiser - such as The Women's Tour -  to get a decent slot on the calendar where it can evolve and grow and meanwhile we have some quite poor quality events continuing to exist. We need to be bold enough to get rid of  some of these weaker races from the elite calendar. For example we would have liked to extend The Women's Tour from 5 to 6 days in 2016 but this was not possible due to calendar congestion.  I absolutely accept that the UCI made the right decision to protect the well-established and respected race taking place the week before us so have no problem with their decision but I do feel we should  have fewer, and/or better coordinated, events overall.  I believe this is what the UCI is trying to achieve with its Women's World Tour Calendar where we will see two levels of races developing.  But it is a tremendous frustration to SweetSpot at the moment as we have had to turn away many towns who wanted to host the race at a time when women's racing could do with some longer stage races. 

    The long term change I would make is to make it obligatory for World Tour teams to run a professional women's team.  I appreciate that there are arguments for and against forcing change rather than encouraging it but the fact is that there are a considerable number of comparatively well-funded teams bidding for World Tour licences each year. These are typically funded by large corporate organisations, of one sort or another, and it seems inconceivable to me that they can simply ignore women.  If you extrapolate the situation only slightly it is like a major corporation saying they will only employ, or discriminate in favour of,  men.    Women's cycling is now well established but needs a helping hand.  You could start off with fairly modest ambitions and standards and say, for example,  that the minimum budget for each team needs to be 500,000 Euros per annum which is not a mind-blowing amount for a Pro Tour team.  It might mean a slightly smaller budget for male riders - but so what if every team had the same conditions? And I accept that it would not be true equality but I believe that after a while teams would start to develop and expand the budgets of their women's teams to get the best riders and levels of professionalism.  I also believe that the high standards and professionalism of the men's teams filters down to the women - United HealthCare are a great example of where enlightened attitudes make good things possible.

    I know you only asked for one long-term action but I would like another.   I would introduce a policy where every major stage race - let's say national tours just to be very simplistic in this interview - would be obliged to organise a high quality women's stage race (with broadly similar levels of infrastructure to their men's event) or, if that was totally impractical, create a partnership with an existing women's race and make a substantial contribution in terms of cost or infrastructure to that race.  Again talking very simplistically you would then in one hit have women's stage races (of say five days) of:  Spain, Italy, Switzerland, France, Belgium, Netherlands, USA, Poland, Australia, New Zealand, China, Qatar, GB, Norway, Denmark and others.  If those were organised to a high level using the expertise of national stage race organisers you would immediately have a truly elite World Tour calendar with the classics added on.  I don't think we need these massive fields of nearly 200 riders that we see in women's racing.  You could run these events with a super-elite field of 100 riders - to make them truly marketable and keep costs manageable for organisers - some of these races could be Women's World Tour level and some "development" level.  I also think if you created these World Tour "National Tours" you would have something logical and tangible to offer an overall Series Sponsor who could clearly understand what he was getting - a series of the very best national races from all over the world organised to a high level - and each country would have a pretty good value proposition for national sponsors.  The elite 100 would ride each major tour with wild card invitations going out to the "second division" developmental teams in the host country.  You could copy football and have two relegations and promotions a year so the focus would be on the top and bottom.  I believe all of this is achievable with the right commitment and, importantly, a level of investment in terms of cost and the political will to take some tough decisions.  I know it needs to be properly thought through but this is where my thoughts currently lie.


    Yolanda Álvarez
    Short term: televising all important races, not accepting organizers which do not give decent and up-to-date informations via social media and web page. Minimum wage and equal prize money.

    Long term: all men's pro teams to have a women's pro team. Cycling schools to get more promotion and funds so that more young girls get involved in the sport.


    Karl Lima
    Change 1: Prohibit Mix Teams, that often destroy the races, and definitely add a big touch of amateurism to women cycling. If a team cannot afford to go to a race, they shouldnt be able to get a win by placing their best rider for free into a club team or similar.
    Change 2: All World Tour Teams need to have a womens team, and all the World Tours have to show at least the last hour of the womens races instead of showing men eating bars and smiling of mickey mouse breaks that can never succeed :-)


    Velofocus
    .On a quick wins, requiring national bodies to use their allocation of places at World Championships would be an obvious one. Or providing simple website templates for races to use and publish press releases and results within a reasonable time frame after the conclusion of races would be a great starting point.

    Longer term goals are tough as the women's side of the sport especially seems to be progressing so fast right now. A raising of the maximum length of races, not necessarily in their stage length but number of stages could be a great step. Three weeks for a Grand Tour is probably excessive but having more stage races that are longer than a week (or at least having the option) allows a greater story to be told of the races and the contenders as the race unfolds.


    Sarah Connolly
    Short-term is improve communication.  Ask stakeholders (riders, teams, races, media, fans etc) what they want, and get more staff in place to implement it.  I suspect the comms issue is linked to not having enough staff on it, and there are some fantastic things they do (thinking of how the CX and MTB twitters engage, eg) but it needs to be a key priority - if you're doing the best work in the world, what does it matter if no one knows about it?  I'd definitely include making sure teams know about new races ASAP as that doesn't seem to happen.

    Long term (and they might already be doing this) - more television/internet streaming for races.  And make it mainstream/easy to find.


    Suze Clemitson
    Immediately - root out all the bad coaches and directeur sportifs and team bosses: the ones who see their team as a sexual smorgasbord, or who are using the women's sport as a way into the men's sport. As a longer term change I'd like to see all the Classics offering a women's race. A women's Paris-Roubaix, for example, would be an incredible showcase for women riders - for their toughness, their competitiveness and for the beauty of the women's sport in an easily digestible, TV and audience friendly chunk.

    Jessi Braverman
    Without a doubt, the long-term change I would make would be increased television coverage and/or other sources of live (unblocked) streams of women’s race. I likely wouldn’t have said this with such conviction before the last year, but it’s becoming abundantly clear that live broadcast is a clear path toward measurable change that paths the way for change in other areas.

    Assuming I have to be realistic in terms of the short-term change (ie. that it’s change that, in theory, could happen on the spot), the immediate change I would make would be to eliminate podium girls (both at the men’s races and the women’s race). This would be symbolic change more than anything but demonstrates that our governing body and race organisations understand the message they send by using women as on-stage accessories and would prefer to send the opposite message.

    In the words of Julie Leth, who I just spoke with about this very issue: “How can we expect people to take us seriously when even our governing body does not?”
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  • « Last Edit: December 17, 2015, 11:02 by just some guy »

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    Re: Women´s Cycling Round table
    « Reply #3 on: December 15, 2015, 11:51 »
    Question 3.
    The dinner party question! If you could have a dinner party with 5 people from the world of cycling past or present, who would they be and why? Doesn´t have to be Women´s cycling only but .....


    Cycling Direct Stuart
    1. Brian Cookson. To sit him down and get replies that we could openly discuss about his vision for cycling.
    2. Rochelle Gilmore. Learn how she has done so much to promote women's cycling.
    3. Beryl Burton. One of the all-time great women's cyclists
    4. Ottilie Quince.   Kidney recipient, multiple world transplant games champion and all round good egg.
    5. Helen Wyman.  From the road to CX to a DS's wife a great insight with all the great work she has done.


    Stefan Wyman
    Nicole Cooke – The best rider I’ve ever worked with on the road. I’ve had many dinners with Nicole, but I’d love to know her thoughts on the sport going forward. 

    Hanka Kupfernagel – She’s knows this sport inside out. If there was one rider I’d like to collaborate with on a team it’s Hanka.

    Sharron Fuller – A BBC employee, who could help change the media fortunes of the sport if we’d embrace the knowledge of such people.

    Alan Sugar – As I think I’d like to pitch to him my idea for a team, and be his apprentice.  And more seriously, I’d like a real business perspective to balance discussions going forward, from someone who loves cycling.   

    Martyn Ashton – He’s there to provide the after dinner speech.  He’s the best in the business at it, loves cycling, has so much passion.  The best.



    Guy Elliot
    The first person I would invite is Marianne Vos and not because of her athletic ability.  She spent a week with us at The Women's Tour and is highly intelligent, measured and articulate and cares about the wider development of the sport.  She is a fantastic ambassador and as her career draws to a close (at some stage and not soon I hope!) we need to use her to her full potential to help drive the sport forward.  When I first got to her know she seemed a little reserved perhaps as she meets so many people but the more you get to know her the more you appreciate what good company she is.  (I would also ask her Father by the way as he is a top guy)

    Then I would invite Eddie Jordan from Formula One.  I am not remotely interested in motor racing but he is a man of vision and has great clarity of thought in a global sports environment.  I believe someone like that could make a massive difference to women's cycling.  He is also the drummer in his band Eddie and The Robbers and seems pretty good company.  He rides a bike and like most of the Formula 1 guys is very fit and knows the bike scene.

    Then Tracey Gaudry who spent some time with us at The Women's Tour.  She has the ability to change our sport and I would like to get to know her better and ask how I could help her.  She is a tough woman and I think we have the right leader for women's cycling there.

    Kristy Scrymgeour because I admire what she has achieved and I would like to ask her hundreds of questions to help me better understand women's cycling.

    Finally I would invite Rochelle Gilmore.  She is a woman who can make things happen and doesn't accept no for an answer and pushes boundaries.  We need people like her.

    If anyone dropped out I would then ask Marv Barras.  I don't know him well but he impresses me.


    Yolanda Álvarez
    Hanka Kupfernagel: a living cycling legend

    Helen Wyman: she is fun

    Marianne Vos: thanks to her I am a women's cycling fan

    Judith Ardnt: a fighter against all odds

    Joane Somarriba: a Spanish cycling legend


    Karl Lima
    - Ina Yoko Teutenberg: Because she was a great sprinter and everybody likes her
    - Anna van Der Breggen: Because my wife wanted me to sign her some years ago and I replied: She have not enough points.
    - Leontin Van Moorsel: Because she was the greatest, and she made a great team too
    - Monica Valen: Beacuse she was the only Norwegian World champ so far
    - Pauline Ferrand Prevot: Because I like the French people and I hope she get Olympic MTB Champion


    Velofocus
    That's a tough one... I think I'd have to make it a 'thank you' dinner for some of the people who've been so supportive whilst I've been establishing myself as a photographer in women's cycling. They may not realise it but their words of encouragement or little chats on race days have spurred me on, and hopefully made me a better photographer for it. If I have to limit it to just five, it'd be 'The Pasio's' (Carl and Ashleigh-Moolman), Carlee Taylor, Annemiek van Vleuten and Stef Wyman. But there are so many more, perhaps I could make it an open buffet rather than a sit down meal for five? :)

    Sarah Connolly
    Hmmm....  I'd want people who've been around in modern times but for a long time, to hear how thing have changed - and to definitely hear all their stories!  I'd like Ina-Yoko Teutenberg, Judith Arndt, Hanka Kupfernagel, and Emma Pooley, Martine Bras and Marijn de Vries because they tell great stories!  I know that's 6, but you know they're ALL my favourites!

    Suze Clemitson
    I would love to sit down to dinner with Jean Robic and Rene Vietto because their characters absolutely fascinate me, Ottavio Bottechia to solve definitely one of cycling's greatest mysteries, Marie Marvingt (the woman who rode the route of the 1908 Tour de France amongst her many other extraordinary accomplishments) just to listen in awe to what she managed to achieve in the era she achieved it and Jacques Anquetil to talk astronomy, time trialling and Raymond Poulidor. Hopefully Hannah Grant will be in the kitchen and Hugo Koblet can be our waiter de charme. But there are really too many I'd love to hear their stories from first hand - Coppi, Bobet, Ocana, Desgrange etc etc etc etc

    Jessi Braverman
    I’ve worked for (and travelled with) women’s teams for going on ten years, and I live in Girona, so I get to have dinner with a lot of the current or recently retired stars of our sport on a fairly regular basis - which I genuinely appreciate There's no one (or five) people that initially jump to mind over others in terms of current or former athletes.

    I would love to swap tricks of the trade with Bonnie Ford or Juliet Macur. Anytime I have an in-depth conversation with Kristy Scrymgeour, I always walk away feeling energized. I also will never forget the feeling of speaking with Mel Hoskins and Nettie Edmondson immediately after they won team pursuit gold at the 2015 Track World Championships, so I would say dinner with anyone after they accomplished something huge ranks high on the list.

    Also – I am so incredibly impressed with what Brandon Stanton has been able to do with storytelling through Humans of New York and would love to find a way to incorporate his model into telling the stories of the various people that make up women’s cycling.

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  • « Last Edit: December 17, 2015, 12:22 by just some guy »

    just some guy

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    Re: Women´s Cycling Round table
    « Reply #4 on: December 15, 2015, 11:58 »
    Question 4.
    Much of the promotion of Women's cycling comes from people like yourselves. What could "we" do better? How can The Social media sector/teams/sponsors/races promote women's cycling in a better way?


    Cycling Direct Stuart
    We could be far more pro-active and work between ourselves in a far more open fashion to better the sport.  Currently it's all so secret and intrinsic "jobs for the in few" at the expense of the sport.

    Stefan Wyman
    I think it needs to a far more joined up approach.  Some teams are good at social media, some aren’t. The good ones all have their niche. Races at the top end, especially some in the USA have fantastic websites, and use of social media.  I see under the WT proposals a minimum amount of video coverage needs to be produced, but I think we will see a vast array of quality and types of coverage. 

    Some kind of review of current practice needs to be carried out and a standard formula (Minimum standards) put in place as part of the registration process of a race.  For example, every race should have a website with a minimum amount of information on it….like a start time, a sheet of places and times the race passes, results.   

    A simple central twitter account with someone travelling the World Tour Scene tweeting directly from races would be easy, cheap (ish) and hugely productive.  A central pool of photo’s for teams/press etc to use, timing chips so results are quickly published.  Simple things, huge benefits. 

    In women’s cycling, teams are good at highlighting their own achievements, but actually, we all need to be a little less self-focused, and try to grow the sport in general.  Each slice of bigger cake is going to be much more fulfilling than a big wedge of the tiny little cup cake we have now.


    Guy Elliot
    In SweetSpot we have a great PR team led by Pete Hodges with Grace Metcalf.  They focus heavily on social media right across the year and especially in the build up to the race in June.  They find it tremendously frustrating getting teams to even reply to e mails asking for information that we could use on social media for their benefit.  When I mention this I often hear "Oh teams have limited resources" but failing to reply to simple e mails asking for very basic information makes life difficult for them - so for example we want to put out pre-race publicity on all teams and they are trying to hit print deadlines only to tell me despite several e mail reminders quite a few teams have not even replied or called.  I also have to say I find (some) riders' agents very difficult to deal with on occasion - simply not answering e mails or returning calls; there have been many occasions when I have thought I am totally wasting my time trying to contact them.

    It would be better if we were all joined up on a social media strategy but I am not sure how we could make that happen.  If we could somehow work better as organisers, teams, riders etc that would help and I think if the UCI appointed someone like Sarah Connelly as a Social Media guru that would make significant progress - she does a massive amount of work, entirely unpaid as a supporter, and attacks everything with such boundless enthusiasm and knows everyone.  We should be using that  talent and enthusiasm. She is slightly eccentric which is a plus as she looks at things in a different way which is just what we need.   I also get mildly frustrated at initiatives that are launched to change women's sport which then fade away.  Purely as an example, when a recent women's cycling initiative was about to be launched in London I heard about it just by chance and was approached by several major national sports marketing companies asking what it was and whether  they should attend.  I tried to get information on what the launch was about but could not get anything and so the marketing companies didn't turn up.  Some of these initiatives seem like a series of well intentioned actions that no proper Marketing Director would sign off as they claim they are going to change the world whilst we all know they won't.  That creates an own goal.

    If you look at Rabobank and Wiggle Honda they pretty much tick all the boxes in the way social media works and interfaces with organisers.  They contact us before The Women's Tour agreeing a communications and marketing strategy  with Pete and Grace and they get it bang on so I would say they are the benchmark for what we need and they prove it can be done.  I also like and respect the way Bigla handle their social media and several other teams do their best on limited budgets but Rabobank and Wiggle Honda set the standard.


    Yolanda Álvarez
    I think we cannot do better as most of us do this out of any economical interest. On top of that, more than often we see how official sources use our information, time and work and claim it is theirs! We could report this aloud and proud so that sponsors, promoters etc do not take advantage of out time and effort and concentrate in their own stuff.

    Social media sector has contributed a great deal to women's cycling growth. Still, a better way could be paying more attention to riders. Most have interesting personal and/ or professional stories which pass unnoticed


    Karl Lima
    Focus on the positive sides of women cycling instead of looking for problems. I have been guilty of the latter myself.

    Velofocus
    Fan-made media is great but I think the real potential is in the teams and races engaging with the public better. Some teams are great and they're hard to fault, given their limited resources but some could do so much more. Perhaps teams 'buddying up' with their 'home' races for cross-promotion would help. Or races pooling their resources for race communications on social channels. To build a following for a group of races rather than races acting in silos. The potential fans are there, it just needs to be easier to access for everyone.

    Sarah Connolly
    Grow our audiences, and keep the emphasis on what newbies need to know.  I don't always live by this, but making it easy for new fans is the primary thing.  I remember how weird I found everything, and cycling *is* complicated.  I personally struggle with my balance of anger and  positivity, and it can be super-hard to have to explain to people when they get to the "WTAF?" stage of understanding the sport, especially when (like I was) new fans know about sports that have more equality, like athletics, or swimming, or triathlon. 

    And we should promote each other more.  Again, it can be hard if one feels that other people don't promote you, or seem to actively not want to share an audience, but it's the right thing to do - someone might not like my "voice" or approach or whatever, but they could follow a link and find someone who is perfect for them.  Yeah, they're not following me, but they wouldn't be anyway, and now they're following the sport.  Races & teams can do the same - share, share, share, and everyone benefits. 

    Re races and teams - there's some great examples of this - I love how Boels, as just one example, help fans follow races via Richard Steege's livetweeting, and Bigla had a great social media strategy as a brand new team, and how Vårgårda grew their media coverage, from a live ticker & radio, to fixed cameras on finish-line, to adding fixed cameras on the hill too, to live stream, un-geo-restricted.  If a race or a team thinks "well, I don't have the money", talk to other places that do it well - Energiewacht Tour, for example, is completely staffed by volunteers, and have wonderful internet coverage and social media.   Ask for advice, and for teams, see if any riders are up for getting involved (paying them a bit more, of course).  I have always had a dream of the UCI doing this, pulling together a set of examples of where promotion is done well, with tips on how races/teams made it happen, but until then, keep reaching out until someone answers!


    Suze Clemitson
    It would be great to see the UCI really up their social media presence as far as women's cycling is concerned and become a real part of the social media conversation around the sport. I'd love to see teams/sponsors providing social media hubs at races so fans could get connected at races and really build the narrative around a race. More fan consultation run in real time through social media to build the level of engagement and give fans the sense they're being listened to. Sponsors to make special offers linked to riders and races they're involved with - giving away freebies to fans who have the codeword posted on social media, for example.

    Jessi Braverman
    Promote each others’ work. Ask good questions. Give good answers. Challenge teams and race organisations to set a high standard. Hold the governing bodies and the media and brands accountable (over and over and over again). Celebrate the change we see (yay to female sport director course with scholarships on offer!) while pointing to places where we still hope to see change (boo to riders that haven’t been paid and are without recourse to have their contracts enforced).

    Frame it all as an equality issue. To me – that’s the biggest difference between women’s cycling and men’s cycling. The latter is sport and entertainment. The former, as the Aviva Women’s Tour so aptly demonstrates, is a social movement.

    I will never forget when Guy Elliott of Aviva Women’s Tour said to me: “The disparity between what is on offer for men and what is on offer for women at the highest level of cycling is a commentary on the inequality endemic in our society. There are moral and social reasons for promoting equality. The objective of the Women’s Tour is to send a strong message that women do not have to be second best.”

    It is a sentiment I share but have never so eloquently articulated. And I thought yes. This. This is it.

    Rinse. Repeat.
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  • « Last Edit: December 17, 2015, 10:13 by just some guy »

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    Re: Women´s Cycling Round table
    « Reply #5 on: December 15, 2015, 12:00 »
    Question 5.
    In 5 years’ time, what will be the biggest issue in women´s cycling? Who will be the riders  (female) – that we will be discussing as the stars of the sport?


    Cycling Direct Stuart
    The biggest issue will still be the lack of sponsorship unless the UCI can find a way to provide a return to teams and sponsors.  Velon has some good ideas although not convinced the way those ideas are being implemented is correct. Even Oleg Tinkovs vision about financial returns has merit that women's cycling needs.   Both in the men's and women's disciplines there cannot be this continuous money pit, sucking sponsors dry for no hard returns.

    Biggest stars - So much young talent out there it is so difficult to pick them out

    Katarzyna Niewiadoma
    Hazel Magill (RSA) - My outsider pick
    Yolanda Neff
    Hannah Barnes
    Floortje Mackaij
    Pauline Ferrand Prevot
    Elena Cecchini
    Clara Koppenburg


    Stefan Wyman
    I’d like to think that in 5 years we’d be discussing new riders that are youth riders right now, or perhaps who haven’t even picked up a bike.  I’d like to think that not many people have heard of them yet.  These riders can be inspired by the current generation, like Lizzie and Pauline, and hopefully get to fulfil their dreams of not only riding with these stars, but also beating them. 

    I’d also like to see these rider surrounded by the stars of today, who haven’t grown disillusioned and left the sport.  Riders that are enjoying a long and healthy career in supportive and dynamic environments.

    I’m confident the sport will get bigger and better, and the future for these riders will be excellent. I wouldn’t have a team with young promising riders if I didn’t feel they had a future.  So, you might even see one of them as a household name.   

    Guy Elliot
    I think in five years's time we will have made progress and there will be a good Women's World Tour with a second division of perfectly good "other races".  I would like to think that each year we will see good teams fighting to get a slot on the Women's World Tour and many women's teams operating with budgets similar to  the Pro Continental teams. I am not remotely bothered whether we have a three week Grand Tour on the race calendar as I don't see why we have to copy or replicate the men's calendar as women's racing should develop something different.  I hope we see well organised women's national tours in all major countries and that our female athletes are better recognised and appreciated.  I don't feel qualified to pick the best riders so far ahead but I think PFP, Elisa Longo Borghini and Anna van der Breggen have very bright futures.

    Yolanda Álvarez
    Guessing game: that the world of cycling talks about the greatness of this sport without gender differences.

    The riders to be the next stars will come from the U.S, UK and Australia. These countries are nurturing women's cycling in a clever way, so the future cycling stars talk English.


    Karl Lima
    In 5 years, we will probably still look for causes to complain about how everybody treat women cycling bad, even though it will probably be much better. The stars of the sport will be the likes of Susanne Andersen (Norway), Anna van der Breggen, Elisa Longo Borghini, Pauline Ferrand Prevot.

    Velofocus
    The breadth and depth of talent in women's cycling seems to be improving with every year that passes. I'm sure we'll be talking about riders that are starting to make their mark now, like Floortje Mackaij, Kasia Niewiadoma and Amalie Dideriksen. Then of course Chloe Dygert's performance in the Juniors at Worlds is hard to ignore.


    Sarah Connolly
    I have no idea how to answer that question!  I could go cynical or optimistic, but in 5 years' time, I hope the Olympics have really upped the profile of the sport, as they have done every time, we won't have any holes in the 2021 calendar, due to "pop-up" races appearing for 1 year (& Olympic qualification points) only, and I won't be doing all of the stuff I do, because the mainstream media will be covering women's cycling, & people won't need me!

    Stars of the future?  I am excited about Floortje Mackaij and Amalie Dideriksen, but I am terrible at 5 year predictions - so much can change, and young riders can disappear or take time to adjust to the elites - and of course we always have the influx of (relatively) late-comers into the sport.  I think in 5 years time the sport will still be dominated by Dutch and Italian riders as the big rider blocs, but I think it'll be much more international, and the inspiration provided by riders like Mayuko Hagiwara and Ashleigh Moolman-Pasio will mean there are more girls from Asia and Africa dreaming big cycling dreams - I hope there'll be amazing pathways into the sport for these women. 



    Suze Clemitson
    I hate to say it but probably the same issues that face it currently - we'll still be talking about the lack of a minimum wage if Cookson's time scale is to be believed. I'm notoriously lousy at predicting stars of the future, but in five years time we'll have undoubtedly seen a changing of the guard - and there's always someone flying on the radar who breaks through and leaves us all to lift our jaws off the floor. Hopefully, however, whoever the sport's new stars turn out to be they'll find themselves competing in a sport that is professional, well regulated, safe and has an exciting and challenging calendar worthy of their talents.

    Jessi Braverman
    Call me crazy but I genuinely believe this upswing in women’s cycling is a true indication of the progress to come. I was at the meeting last March in which the UCI revealed its long-term plans to professionalize women’s cycling, and the plan addressed all the major issues currently in play – the race calendar, television and digital coverage, the vulnerability of teams and riders under the current model, financial stability (including minimum wage and prize money), increased accountability and instruction for team staff, etc. I believe we can (and hope we will) make serious inroads on tackling these issues over the next five years.

    As the sport becomes more financially stable, the risk for doping increases. I hope women’s cycling never goes down the path that men’s cycling has gone done, but I think it’s something we need to actively monitor. The testing pool for women is so much smaller than the testing pool for men, and this needs to change as the sport grows.

    Who will we be discussing in five years? I’m going to limit myself to road racing only in my response - Pauline Ferrand-Prevot, Jolien d’Hoore, Jolanda Neff, Amalie Dideriksen, Kasia Niewiadoma and Coryn Rivera. If they’re still racing, Lizzie Armitstead and Marianne Vos make my list, too.

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  • « Last Edit: December 17, 2015, 10:15 by just some guy »

    just some guy

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    Re: Women´s Cycling Round table
    « Reply #6 on: December 15, 2015, 12:00 »
    1st thanks once again everyone who took the time to respond, as thanks to a tweet from Guy Elliot I have decided to answer the questions myself. No real need for a Bio JustSomeGuy was chosen as my handle because I didn´t really see the need to promote myself and pride myself on being the same as I would be in person behind a anon, but the way it has worked out many have my name and email address :fp  So anyways here is my answers, and as many of you already know all typo´s are mine and if you are new to here check out the womens section here and if you like what we do please get involved the more voices the more fun or follow us on Twitter :twitter



    Question 1.
    In Cookson's Manifesto, one of the main pledges was minimum wages in women's cycling, In a video via Sky news published on the 25th of November 2015 he hopped to 'have a minimum wage in 2 to 3 years', which will be approximately 5 years after being elected, we have the new womens' road commission, we have the expanded World Cup re branded as the Women's World Tour , but once you scratch the surface what has the UCI changed in Women's cycling? Where could the UCI take on a bigger role?

    The womens commission is great and important, but the speed on change is too slow, I think that by the start of 2017 the when the real Womens World Tour (WWT) starts ( hopefully with Bira and a few more climbing races ) there is a minimum wage, without it the changes become less valid, but to get more more money into the sport the UCI needs to be much more active.

    I call this the 20/20 Vision what the UCI needs to do with someone with common sense is look at ways to promote the sport even if no TV is available, and not wait for the private sector ie race organizers, teams and TV stations to do it. And most of this involves a greater Social media foot print, Every major race so the WWT and some others outside of the WWT gets 2 people sent to the race, they do video diaries from a team a day pre and post race ( a backstage pass if you will, called access all area´s ) they get a few minutes video on various aspects of a cyclists life, pre race meeting, and then post race interviews from the same team) also the 2 person team get post race video interviews with the riders who were important part of the day ie winners, breakaway riders, attackers etc - write a race report send a link to the website with all the info give them 3 hours before posting all info on the uci website. Basically do the job of the "news" website until 2020 1 so it is done , 2 so it is done properly and 3 make it easy for them to do it, during the race these 2 are in the race caravan live tweeting the race. More information free and easy to access equals more views and therefore will attract sponsors.

    At the moment the social media of @UCIWomensCycling is a disgrace and the live race tweeting is pathetic, it is a simple way to promote the sport. I would also suggest removing some of the rules the UCI have re social media as to give the twitter account some personality.( or as we would say where I am from remove the pole from it´s arse ;) )
    But that would mean that many of the people currently involved would need to go   



    Question 2.
    You have been given the keys to the Palace and have and can make 2 changes to Womens´cycling in 1 hour you can make 1 short term change ie to be implemented on the spot and 1 long term change ie to the implemented over the next 3 year to the way the UCI runs Womens cycling/or a change provided by the private sector what would you do?


    Quick change - would be the social media angles discussed above and yes I have more simple and reasonably cost effective ideas, but would get the RCS to have a womens Milano SanRemo and Lombardia and the ASO to have a womens Paris-Roubiax

     the long - a new Grand tour is started in North America ( by the ASO ) and La Course by Le Tour gets dropped by them, the race is run in the last 10 days of the tour and the live racing is shown straight after the highlights of the tour on Eurosport, sure the calendar would need changing and the Giro Donna need moving earlier etc


    Question 3.
    The dinner party question! If you could have a dinner party with 5 people from the world of cycling past or present, who would they be and why? Doesn´t have to be Women´s cycling only but .....

    Kathy Watt
    Anna Mearers
    Mara Abbott
    Evie Stevens
    Emma Johnasson

    and I am not telling why :P

    and Sarah Connolly we have had how should I put it discussions , heated chats, ummm arguments with Sarah but I did say one day we will have a beer and see that we are not that far away from each other in ideas re womens cycling so may as well be now




    Question 4.
    Much of the promotion of Women's cycling comes from people like yourselves. What could "we" do better? How can The Social media sector/teams/sponsors/races promote women's cycling in a better way?

    There is a massive click in cycling but the womens is pretty amazing, there needs to be a greater cross promotion and following and this is from teams and us on twitter etc. But there needs to be more open cross promotion. I also would like race organisations to make it easy to download maps and profiles, sure there might be some copyright issues, but every race thread that starts is promotion of the sport and more promotion is always better   

    Question 5.
    In 5 years’ time, what will be the biggest issue in women´s cycling? Who will be the riders  (female) – that we will be discussing as the stars of the sport?

    Doping , with more money there will be more cheating - human nature can be as ugly as good, I also think many of our current issues will be there ie less TV time , money etc

    As for the stars, I will leave the kiss of death to myself
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  • « Last Edit: December 17, 2015, 10:17 by just some guy »

     



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