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AG

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Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
« Reply #30 on: December 19, 2015, 10:41 »
its certainly a hard one.

You would have thought though that the UCI being the governing body for all of cycling would have had an enormous amount of consultation with its biggest stakeholder and biggest race organiser when proposing yet another set of reforms.

The fact that it has got to this does not speak well for Brian Cookson's management and consulting style.

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  • Kiwirider

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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #31 on: December 19, 2015, 13:24 »
    The debate reminds me of one that is going on at our client's site at the moment.

    Up in the oil sands, workers are paid Living On-site Allowance (LOA) to come in for the month or so at a time to work on large maintenance shuts. This is worth about $200/day to them - and is effectively a cash bonus, as they get it on top of the free accommodation and food that they get while living in camp. The argument is that it is necessary to get the best workers - however anyone who is familiar with well proven models like Herzberg's hygiene and motivation factors sees the flaw in that logic. Naturally enough, in the world of $35/bbl oil, questions are being asked about paying LOA - which hasn't always been a part of pay packages (only really hitting in at that scale since the world of > $100/bbl oil). The usual answer goes something along the lines of "the companies always say that they wont, but at the last minute cave in and pay what the unions ask". In the current depressed market where there are supply gluts and where oil companies are starting to realise that they need to change from their well established paradigm of throwing money at problems, we may see a change.

    To me, the situation is similar here.

    ASO owns some big races, and consequently thinks that it has all of the power. It has been holding the sport to ransom for the last few years because of its place as a media company and the various sponsorship rights that it has sold for its events. They reached that position of ascendancy largely on the back of Armstrong's results - with the rise in interest in the US and the typical market view there of paying over the odds for sporting events (price of a 30 second spot in the Superbowl anyone?). Prior to that, the Tour was really just the biggest stage race in France and a slightly bigger race than the Giro and some of the one day classics - as the (well deserved) fuss made over Roche's triple crown demonstrates.

    As a result of that overblown status for one of it's races, ASO thinks that it rules the roost and can dictate the shape of the sport. That is clear from their opposition to the concept of the World Tour reforms - regardless of whether the mechanics of those reforms are right or not. Adding more races means that sponsors will look to spread their advertising dollar around more - which is likely to remove sponsorship revenue from ASO and, consequently, its position of power. Given the apparent relative decline in interest in the Tour - it has been commented on often enough, and vainly "countered" by paid seals like Phil and Paul - they are, I am sure, understandably worried. Add to that the general decline in interest in road cycling relative to other disciplines, and the market is entering a time of change. ASO see the future, and it is the same as their medium term past, and they're not that interested in it.

    Someone needs to stand up to them and say "take your races, see what happens". And really, what could happen?

    I for one don't see any major impact, as the teams still need the races that will sit under the UCI banner. Remember that, while the big races like the classics and the GTs are the pointy end of the racing calendar, the teams make most of their sponsorship with the exposure that they get at the remaining couple of hundred days of racing across the season. I also doubt that the other race organisers will go with ASO - the latter have shown themselves to be sufficiently predatory in their efforts to sink other races and then buy them that it'd be like a swimmer siding with a crocodile or a shark.

    Remember as well that there are a good number of races outside of France that have a huge following that are crucially important to the teams that come from those countries. Could you imagine any Italian team saying "sorry, we're not going to race the Giro because we'd rather be friends with ASO?". Or a Belgian team wanting to miss RVV?

    The UCI also hold a trump card at the moment in that they administer cycling globally. For ASO to really break away from the UCI, they'd need to put in place the entire administrative structure for the sport - or pay someone else to do so. And remember, ASO isn't a race organising company - it's a media company. It owns those races solely to provide a basis to generate advertising revenue - not for some altruistic vision of making cycling a better place for all. The less that they need to be involved in actually running those races in order to generate their return, the better for them.

    So, even though overall I don't trust Cookson and don't really rate the UCI as being that different to our friends in FIFA, IAAF or IOC (or in fact it's own previous incarnations), I'm on their side in this battle ... They need to stand up to ASO and not blink ... and let's watch what follows ...
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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #32 on: December 19, 2015, 19:18 »
    its certainly a hard one.

    You would have thought though that the UCI being the governing body for all of cycling would have had an enormous amount of consultation with its biggest stakeholder and biggest race organiser when proposing yet another set of reforms.

    The fact that it has got to this does not speak well for Brian Cookson's management and consulting style.

    seems the UCI knew this was about to go down, there has been many a secret meeting to try and stop it

    The ASO is playing our way or we do our own thing
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    Carlo Algatrensig

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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #33 on: December 19, 2015, 23:49 »
    In this bun fight there is only one winner and that is ASO

    In terms of globalisation the UCI might be able to take the sport around the world to various countries to "globalise" it but while the main revenue stream to the sport is still team sponsorship there is only one race that matters and despite what some might want to think that race is the Tour de France. While the Tour de France is the main race and i cant see that changing for a long time basically the ASO will always have the upper hand in any argument/dispute with the UCI
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  • AG

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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #34 on: December 20, 2015, 00:16 »
    I dont agree with most of what you have said Kiwirider  :P

    ASO holds the trump cards in this game, and they know it.   The interest in the Tour is not declining ... and the interest in all the other races combined is not enough to cover the loss of the Tour (even without the Dauphine, PN, LBL etc)

    Yes the Belgian, Italian Dutch and Spanish teams wouldnt be super happy - but most of those teams still need the Tour exposure to attract sponsors.

    Even in those countries, the exposure of the Tour is still enormous, and the ASO owns enough races to cause issues for those teams.

    The other teams (Amercian, Aussie, UK and French especially) would all struggle a LOT without the ASO races. 



    Also its important to note that at this stage the ASO is not breaking away.  They are not setting uo their own Tour or anything of the like.  They are just saying we will be HC category ... and thus have more freedom as to who we invite to our races.

    The top Spanish, Italian, Belgian and Dutch teams would still get an invite to the Tour ... but some of the lesser performing teams might struggle to get an invite some years.



    I do agree that its important for our sport that the UCI not completely cave and just let ASO do whatever they want.  But I dont have any faith that the UCI are competent enough to negotiate through this.    :(
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  • Kiwirider

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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #35 on: December 20, 2015, 21:56 »
    I dont agree with most of what you have said Kiwirider  :P

    ASO holds the trump cards in this game, and they know it.   The interest in the Tour is not declining ... and the interest in all the other races combined is not enough to cover the loss of the Tour (even without the Dauphine, PN, LBL etc)

    Yes the Belgian, Italian Dutch and Spanish teams wouldnt be super happy - but most of those teams still need the Tour exposure to attract sponsors.

    Even in those countries, the exposure of the Tour is still enormous, and the ASO owns enough races to cause issues for those teams.

    The other teams (Amercian, Aussie, UK and French especially) would all struggle a LOT without the ASO races. 

    Computer crashed just as I posted a reply ... so here's the "I'm peeed off at IT - Abridged Version" ...

    ASO owns 15 of the 315 WT, Euro Tour and WC races held each year - about 5%

    The teams rely on time in front of their target markets to attract sponsors -and remember that sponsorship is the principal source of their income, not TV rights or prize money.

    Men's road cycling is still a primarily Euro sport, so the principal sponsors are also European. Lampre, Etixx, Movistar have no interest in you or I, since we don't buy their products.

    They are however very interested in Ma and Pa who's house the 300 or so non-ASO races go past - and of course those that the 15 ASO races pass - since they buy their toilets, vitamins, phones, etc ...

    The UCI model of increasing the scope and spread of races sits well with the team's needs in this regard.

    As an anglo, you - and I - get a warped view of the importance of Le Tour. That's primarily because the media in our part of the world has no knowledge of races outside of TdF.
    And where it does have some knowledge, they have a limited understanding of or regard for cycling fans -as the way that TSN puts adverts into its delayed coverage of all other races, but in doing so keeps playing the race in the background. (Makes cyclocross a pain - you got to ads with one rider leading and come back with them in 10th place!)

    ASO is however very interested in us, because they have a greater market for their product - namely television rights (most profitable income stream for them from a bike race). And because of various free to air rules in France and the ease of taking signals across Euro borders, their main interest is in spendy anglo countries - US, UK, Australia , Canada ....

    All that to say that, between their low proportion of races and the fact that I see a misalignment between benefits for teams and ASO, I think that the UCI case is stronger than most people give it credit for. The biggest challenge is that, as a media company, ASO has an advantage in the PR war that it can wage. And of course, the self serving teams - read JV - would support an ASO model if ASO would share their spoils ...(Again, swimming with sharks comes to mind ...)


    Comments about the Bore de France losing spectators are observational/anecdotal based on the coverage. For example, crowds on L'Alpe were much thinner around the top corners than previously. Even Dutch Corner looked like a 4 lane highway compared to its usual madness ...
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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #36 on: December 20, 2015, 22:09 »
    Computer crashed just as I posted a reply ... so here's the "I'm peeed off at IT - Abridged Version" ...

    if this happens ever again...posts are automatically saved as draft if you don't submit them within a couple of minutes (under profile -> my drafts)
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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #37 on: December 20, 2015, 22:50 »
    if this happens ever again...posts are automatically saved as draft if you don't submit them within a couple of minutes (under profile -> my drafts)

    Thanks Search ... although I also take it as an indication that the verbal diarrhea is in full swing ... and that maybe it's the universe's way of telling me to edit what I've written ...  :D :D :D :D
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  • AG

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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #38 on: December 21, 2015, 00:41 »
    you say TV audiences dont matter as money comes from sponsorship.

    I say TV audiences matter an enormous amount as money comes from sponsorship.

    Sponsors pay for coverage.  They pay for advertising, and that comes through TV audiences and TV media types talking about their races, their team, their rider.  It comes from people identifying their product from exposure .... which comes from the high profile races.

    It doesnt come from the likes of the Tour of Perth, Belgian kermisse races or the even the 3rd or 2nd tier races like Paris Brussels or Pais Basque - it comes from the races that the big names race to win.

    It comes from the Tour de France ... where all the big names want to ride and win. 


    ASO might only own 5% of races - but they own the top 5% ... which includes more than 50% of cycling coverage and advertising in many countries.     If you take away the coverage from the Tour and the other ASO races .... some teams wont care much - but many teams will disappear due to sponsors pulling out.   For many teams, the coverage gained from the Tour is their entire reason for sponsorship, and if the UCI cannot guarantee participation in the Tour, why would teams pay the UCI fees to be a WT team?

    I agree - the UCI needs to stand up and not take this ... but the ASO is holding the best hand here, and the UCI needs to include them in the planning and negotiations
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #39 on: December 21, 2015, 06:23 »
    ASO might only own 5% of races - but they own the top 5% ... which includes more than 50% of cycling coverage and advertising in many countries.
    Make that 80-90%.
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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #40 on: December 21, 2015, 08:50 »
    I'm all on ASO side in this case. They run a business project and they want to get as much money as possible from it which is no surprise. If they believe that Uci reforms (how many of these we've seen in recent years?) can bring down their earnings it's not a surprise that they decided to take an action. PR aside, not gonna comment on style as I believe they know what they doing and if they decided to make a public statement instead of discussion behind the scenes they are surely aware of how it will now looks like.

    Uci is still trying to create simple, recognizable series of races and name it (ProTour, World Tour, World Cup and so on...) involving ASO races and all the rest while ASO has a strong product set (Tour and the rest of races) which is very popular and is working well for many years. Not surprised they are not so open for any reforms.
    My sympathies lie with the ASO here as well. UCI has a long history of poor decision making and the ASO are taking measures to protect their product. If the UCI want to dismantle many of the sports most prestigious events they won't come out of it well.

    Rather than forcing wholesale change on to the sport they should be taking the grassroots approach. Races like the Abu Dhabi Tour, Beijing, Qatar etc were poorly thought out money grabs and not liked by teams or riders. If the UCI wants to make lasting change they need to target and grow races that will work, in regions where cycling is popular or growing - such as Langkawi, San Luis, Japan etc.
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  • 42x16ss

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    ASO will do anything to get a Frenchman to win the Tour!
    I hope that's TIC, it's probably the last thing on their minds. Not diluting the prestige of their races would come first.

    Post Merge: December 21, 2015, 08:57
    The debate reminds me of one that is going on at our client's site at the moment.

    Up in the oil sands, workers are paid Living On-site Allowance (LOA) to come in for the month or so at a time to work on large maintenance shuts. This is worth about $200/day to them - and is effectively a cash bonus, as they get it on top of the free accommodation and food that they get while living in camp. The argument is that it is necessary to get the best workers - however anyone who is familiar with well proven models like Herzberg's hygiene and motivation factors sees the flaw in that logic. Naturally enough, in the world of $35/bbl oil, questions are being asked about paying LOA - which hasn't always been a part of pay packages (only really hitting in at that scale since the world of > $100/bbl oil). The usual answer goes something along the lines of "the companies always say that they wont, but at the last minute cave in and pay what the unions ask". In the current depressed market where there are supply gluts and where oil companies are starting to realise that they need to change from their well established paradigm of throwing money at problems, we may see a change.

    To me, the situation is similar here.

    ASO owns some big races, and consequently thinks that it has all of the power. It has been holding the sport to ransom for the last few years because of its place as a media company and the various sponsorship rights that it has sold for its events. They reached that position of ascendancy largely on the back of Armstrong's results - with the rise in interest in the US and the typical market view there of paying over the odds for sporting events (price of a 30 second spot in the Superbowl anyone?). Prior to that, the Tour was really just the biggest stage race in France and a slightly bigger race than the Giro and some of the one day classics - as the (well deserved) fuss made over Roche's triple crown demonstrates.

    As a result of that overblown status for one of it's races, ASO thinks that it rules the roost and can dictate the shape of the sport. That is clear from their opposition to the concept of the World Tour reforms - regardless of whether the mechanics of those reforms are right or not. Adding more races means that sponsors will look to spread their advertising dollar around more - which is likely to remove sponsorship revenue from ASO and, consequently, its position of power. Given the apparent relative decline in interest in the Tour - it has been commented on often enough, and vainly "countered" by paid seals like Phil and Paul - they are, I am sure, understandably worried. Add to that the general decline in interest in road cycling relative to other disciplines, and the market is entering a time of change. ASO see the future, and it is the same as their medium term past, and they're not that interested in it.

    Someone needs to stand up to them and say "take your races, see what happens". And really, what could happen?

    I for one don't see any major impact, as the teams still need the races that will sit under the UCI banner. Remember that, while the big races like the classics and the GTs are the pointy end of the racing calendar, the teams make most of their sponsorship with the exposure that they get at the remaining couple of hundred days of racing across the season. I also doubt that the other race organisers will go with ASO - the latter have shown themselves to be sufficiently predatory in their efforts to sink other races and then buy them that it'd be like a swimmer siding with a crocodile or a shark.

    Remember as well that there are a good number of races outside of France that have a huge following that are crucially important to the teams that come from those countries. Could you imagine any Italian team saying "sorry, we're not going to race the Giro because we'd rather be friends with ASO?". Or a Belgian team wanting to miss RVV?

    The UCI also hold a trump card at the moment in that they administer cycling globally. For ASO to really break away from the UCI, they'd need to put in place the entire administrative structure for the sport - or pay someone else to do so. And remember, ASO isn't a race organising company - it's a media company. It owns those races solely to provide a basis to generate advertising revenue - not for some altruistic vision of making cycling a better place for all. The less that they need to be involved in actually running those races in order to generate their return, the better for them.

    So, even though overall I don't trust Cookson and don't really rate the UCI as being that different to our friends in FIFA, IAAF or IOC (or in fact it's own previous incarnations), I'm on their side in this battle ... They need to stand up to ASO and not blink ... and let's watch what follows ...
    One big problem, ASO doesn't think it owns the power, it DOES. Imagine a calendar with no TdF, Vuelta, Paris Roubaix, L-B-L, Paris Nice, Dauphine, Romandie..... Not much left.

    Last time we had a similar fiasco was in 2008, and Verbruggen realised ASO was too big an opponent. Cookson is about to learn the same thing.
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  • just some guy

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    just some guy

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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #43 on: December 21, 2015, 09:46 »
    CPA Chooses sides The ASO -
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  • Kiwirider

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    Imagine a calendar with no TdF, Vuelta, Paris Roubaix, L-B-L, Paris Nice, Dauphine, Romandie..... Not much left.

    You're right ... only another 300 of the 315 races left ... not many at all ...

    As for no TdF - it is boring and marked by negative racing from the teams who build their season on it. To me there's no loss if it goes - and yes, I really do mean that.

    The Vuelta was going broke a few years back - that's why ASO bought it. It has improved, but still suffers from its place on the calendar (compared to when it was held back in May and marked the start of the GT season).

    ASO don't own Romandie.

    The Dauphine is a good race, but low profile. Only reason that I got to see a stage a couple of years back was because I happened to pick up a copy of L'Equipe and discovered that it was due to pass within about 15km of Annecy where I was at the time ...

    Sure, missing LBL, La Fleche and PR would be a shame ... but we'd still have MSR, RVV, Strade Bianche (which I realise isn't world tour, but is a great race), San Sebastian, Lombardia - not to mention two of my favourites, due to their location, Quebec and Montreal. And there are a ton of great races at the next level down ...

    That's not to say that their wouldn't be an adjustment period - but no-one or nothing is indispensable ...
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  • LukasCPH

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    You're right ... only another 300 of the 315 races left ... not many at all ...
    The main issue isn't how many races would be left - there are lots of non-ASO races, far enough to have a good calendar.

    But it wouldn't be the same cycling as we see now. We - all of us here - are nerds. Big-time nerds, comparable to those who can list all pitchers of all World Series teams from the beginning of baseball to the present day.[1]
    Sponsors, especially the big sponsors cycling tries to attract, don't care particularly much about us happy few - they look at hard numbers. In terms of viewing numbers, but most importantly in terms of name recognition, the Tour de France trumps anything and everything else in cycling. That's the case even in Belgium, Italy, Spain, France - but much, much more so in the "new" markets like the UK, USA, Australia, China, Japan, Malaysia, Colombia etc. Go out on the street and ask random people to name 3-5 cycling races, the Tour will always be named, by everyone.

    That is why it has such overarching (and unhealthy) importance at the present time. It hasn't always been like that: In the 1970s, e.g. Merckx would skip the Tour to ride the Giro despite being defending champion - nobody would voluntarily do the same today.

    The Tour IS more important for cycling than any one race should be, and that does need to change. But, at the moment, it is how it is - and saying "we'll do just fine, better even, without it" is dangerous.
    I'm not at all into motorsports, but even I knew some names of the star drivers in Paris-Dakar when it was actually still Paris-Dakar, and I did watch Le Mans a couple of times because it is Le Mans. Now that the "Dakar Rallye" takes place somewhere in South America I barely raise an eyebrow - and if Le Mans were to be moved, for whatever reason, to Singapore, Vancouver or Johannesburg, it just wouldn't be Le -Mans anymore.
    The Tour, for now, is the single-most recognisable thing in road cycling, and trying to ignore that because you don't like it (I don't like it either) is a recipe for disaster. Other races have to be promoted to a bigger standing, but naturally the Tour organisers will oppose that, preferring to keep their dominant position: It's simply safer, and a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. ASO play their hand well, because they know that they have more leverage.

    Even if things were to get better in time after a break between ASO and UCI (and it's not certain they will), they will have gotten A LOT worse before that.
     1. OK, maybe I'm exaggerating slightly, but you get my point.
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  • Kiwirider

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    The main issue isn't how many races would be left - there are lots of non-ASO races, far enough to have a good calendar.

    But it wouldn't be the same cycling as we see now.

    That is why it has such overarching (and unhealthy) importance at the present time. It hasn't always been like that: In the 1970s, e.g. Merckx would skip the Tour to ride the Giro despite being defending champion - nobody would voluntarily do the same today.

    The Tour IS more important for cycling than any one race should be, and that does need to change. But, at the moment, it is how it is - and saying "we'll do just fine, better even, without it" is dangerous.

    The Tour, for now, is the single-most recognisable thing in road cycling, and trying to ignore that because you don't like it (I don't like it either) is a recipe for disaster.

    Other races have to be promoted to a bigger standing, but naturally the Tour organisers will oppose that, preferring to keep their dominant position: It's simply safer, and a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. ASO play their hand well, because they know that they have more leverage.

    Even if things were to get better in time after a break between ASO and UCI (and it's not certain they will), they will have gotten A LOT worse before that.

    I like your post - but disagree with it.

    I've done an edit of what I see as some of your main points.

    Basically you have summed up the typical mindset that keeps people stuck in the status quo - whatever that status quo may be. They reflect very well on the forces that oppose change - and the forces/arguments that are used very, very well by those who stand to lose the most if change occurs.

    In this case, ASO is very much in the latter category, and they are hoping that they can encourage as many of the stakeholders in road cycling to fit into the former category as possible.

    Basically, if we want to see the sort of changes that you quite rightly (in my opinion at least) identify as being needed, someone has to bite the bullet and take that risk. The time will never, ever be ideal for that change. And - from my experience as someone who goes into businesses and helps them to make the changes necessary to improve their performance -the more that the group who is being "changed against" stand there and make threats or other negative comments, the more that the time is actually right and the circumstances are against them.

    Now I know that this isn't easy ... and that it's easy to sit and say, but always harder to apply to our own lives. (For all of my comments here, I have a personal situation at the moment where I know that change is and will be good, but am still scared by it.) But sometimes we just need to listen to the Romans  ... Carpe diem!!   :D
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #47 on: December 22, 2015, 17:50 »
    An article (in French) on why the Giro shouldn't try to move to July from 2017:
    http://www.cyclingpro.net/velopro/road/pourquoi-mettre-le-giro-en-juillet-n-a-pas-de-sens

    Seeing as they're French, they're not entirely unbiased ;) - but there are some good points in it.
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #48 on: January 22, 2016, 14:50 »
    http://www.businessinsider.de/aso-uci-war-tour-de-france-pro-cycling-2016-1?op=1

    Business Insider with their take on the ASO-UCI spat. Haven't read it in full yet; I'll sum up some points when I have.
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  • just some guy

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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #49 on: January 22, 2016, 17:09 »
    Cookson told someone that him and Prudhomme would be talking at the TDU

    Prudhomme didn´t bother going to Australia  :lol
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  • Armchair Cyclist

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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #50 on: January 22, 2016, 20:20 »
    http://www.businessinsider.de/aso-uci-war-tour-de-france-pro-cycling-2016-1?op=1

    Business Insider with their take on the ASO-UCI spat. Haven't read it in full yet; I'll sum up some points when I have.

    Seems rather slanted towards the UCI/Vaughters point of view, and written with a poor understanding of what promotion/relegation entails in both WT/Pro conti terms and English football.
    " In actuality, it means that every year a few teams get relegated down to pro cycling's second division (Pro Continental)": not remotely true, only 4 teams have been relegated (one of them twice) since the introduction of WT status in 2009.

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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #51 on: January 23, 2016, 12:41 »
    Cookson says a lot on several topics:
    http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/cookson-on-uci-and-aso-standoff/

    And he utters his surprise that Froome isn't riding the TDU, but does ride the Herald Sun Tour:
    http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/news/latest-news/chris-froomes-absence-from-tour-down-under-puzzling-says-brian-cookson-208357
    Quote
    “In a way perhaps the Tour Down Under is a victim of its own success,” Cookson said.
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  • Leadbelly

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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #52 on: June 24, 2016, 05:34 »
    http://www.uci.ch/pressreleases/professional-cycling-council-agrees-next-steps-the-reform-and-approves-207-uci-worldtour-calendar/

    ...... and they're all friends again.  :)

    Quote
    The calendar will comprise all existing UCI WorldTour races – including those in the Amaury Sport Organisation (ASO) portfolio.

    In addition, the UCI WorldTour will welcome a number of other events in 2017 which will be awarded initial three-year licences. The full 2017 UCI WorldTour calendar, which will be announced shortly, features a wide range of top-level races that will further globalise the UCI WorldTour and strengthen the season-long narrative.

    UCI WorldTeams will be given a two-year licence for the 2017 and 2018 seasons. The number of UCI WorldTeams will be set at 17 for 2017, with the objective to reach 16 a year later. From the 2019 season onwards, the number of UCI WorldTeams will be set at 16. From the end of the 2018 season onwards, there will be an annual challenge system, based on an overall annual sporting classification, between the last ranked UCI WorldTeam and the top Pro Continental Team to enter as a UCI WorldTeam in the following season. In the event that a UCI WorldTeam drops out of the top tier, that team will have the right to participate in all the following season’s UCI WorldTour events, meaning that UCI WorldTeams will have stability for the three seasons 2017 to 2019.

    As of 2017 season, all existing UCI WordTour events will have all UCI WorldTeams participating and for new UCI WorldTour events, participation rules which will ensure that a minimum of 10 UCI WorldTeams take part will be proposed by the UCI for approval at the next meeting of the PCC.
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  • Carlo Algatrensig

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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #53 on: June 24, 2016, 20:59 »
    When it says the team that falls out of the WT stil has the right to participate in WT events does that mean that they have to ride them or does it mean that they are guaranteed an invite if they want them but not compelled to ride them.
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  • Slow Rider

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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #54 on: June 24, 2016, 21:05 »
    So that creates an interesting situation where - unless another team folds or steps down - one of Bora and Bahrein will miss out on WT status. So after years of the UCI begging teams to step up to WT even if they're not really ready for it (see also: IAM), now there is competition again. Not a bad thing.

    Nothing still, unfortunately, about making teams at races smaller. Which is far more important I think than all these discussions on how many WT teams there should be.
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #55 on: June 24, 2016, 21:20 »
    When it says the team that falls out of the WT stil has the right to participate in WT events does that mean that they have to ride them or does it mean that they are guaranteed an invite if they want them but not compelled to ride them.
    The latter.
    They have the right to participate, not an obligation to participate.
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  • Carlo Algatrensig

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    Re: ASO V World Tour Reforms..
    « Reply #56 on: June 24, 2016, 21:24 »
    The latter.
    They have the right to participate, not an obligation to participate.

    That actually sounds like a sweet deal to me. Not the hassle of having to ride them all and pick and choose the ones that you have riders with a genuine chance in or give you the best return from any sponsorship deals.
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