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just some guy

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Ioannis Tamouridis Q and A
« on: February 03, 2016, 10:57 »
Ioannis Tamouridis Q and A
If there was a Greek God of Cycling*  Ioannis Tamouridis just might be it, He won his 1st National title as a Junior in 1996 and since then has won MTB, Track and Road National titles, and a Silver at the World points race in 2005 for many of us Ioannis became a name when his UCI points saved Euskaltel WT in 2013, The team dropped the all Basque team and Ioannis was one of the riders signed, it didn´t take long for him to show the world of WT Road racing he was not there just for his UCI points and to make up the numbers, he was here to race and attack. Soon us fans were enjoying his attacking style and seeing him in breaks in Spring classics and stage races where unless the road was going upwards seeing the Euskaltel Orange was a bit odd, then you would notice the Greek flag.



But once the team folder Many of us wondered where Ioannis would end, he had shown himself a strong rider, would he be signed by a WT team, unfortunately not and he was re-signed by  SP Tableware the Greece conti team for 1 year and since then signed to Synergy Baku Cycling Project

and we get to see and read a little more of the Greek God of cycling. Ioannis as I am sure you are aware has just started his 2nd year at Baku and Ioannis will be representing Greece at the Olypmics in Rio his 2nd Olympics 

Thanks to The Baku Cycling Project, Ioannis and Susan Westemeyer for helping with the latest Velorooms Q&A season,

Give the team :twitter and Ioannis :twitter a follow if not alreadyand of course Susan or Aunt Susan as some of us know her as  :) :twitter

We will be sending about 10 questions to Ioannis via email , so please get your questions in and the best 10 ish will be sent, end of next week 12th is the deadline. So get your questions in to one of the most interesting Pro riders racing today.



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* there maybe but I have so many tabs open with research stuff so just not looking  :D
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  • « Last Edit: February 03, 2016, 11:08 by just some guy »
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    just some guy

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    Re: Ioannis Tamouridis Q and A
    « Reply #1 on: February 03, 2016, 11:31 »
    How were the 1st few months at Euskaltel ? Were you made welcome and part of the team, not just due to language, but culture and your sytle of racing verse the EE racing style ?
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    Re: Ioannis Tamouridis Q and A
    « Reply #2 on: February 03, 2016, 14:26 »
    You started your pro career at SP Tableware which was probably Greece's top team until it ended in 2014. Since that year, there have been no teams at UCI CT level or above registered in Greece.

    As one of the most successful riders ever to come out of Greece, can you offer a brief survey of the sport in your country?

    This might include:

    Are there certain regions or clubs where the cycling infrastructure is well established?

    How has the financial crisis affected sponsorship opportunities?

    How do talented young riders today find their way to your level?
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    Re: Ioannis Tamouridis Q and A
    « Reply #3 on: February 03, 2016, 21:32 »
    I'm sure you know that the Rio Olympic course is very tough and realistically a very small percentage of the peloton have a chance of getting anywhere near the podium, but do you still go into races like this with the mind frame of "I can win!" or do you set yourself other targets? Is finishing enough? Do you try and get in the break of the day and show off the Greek colours?

    Best of luck anyway!
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  • AG

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    Re: Ioannis Tamouridis Q and A
    « Reply #4 on: February 04, 2016, 01:01 »
    The teams you have been a part of are so incredibly different in culture and beginnings.  How has that translated to the feel of the team and racing?   Is it really different on the road, or pretty much still just racing a bike, just with a different bunch of guys?
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    Re: Ioannis Tamouridis Q and A
    « Reply #5 on: February 04, 2016, 08:53 »
    Over your career so far ( more to come we hope ) you must have raced in some amazing countries How does say riding the Eneco Tour differ from say Azerbajdzjan or another country not from the traditional heart of cycling. Any crazy stories ?
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    Re: Ioannis Tamouridis Q and A
    « Reply #6 on: February 04, 2016, 15:57 »
    What do you typically eat for breakfast before an exhaustive training session?

    Hi Matt :welcome
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  • papasmourf

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    Re: Ioannis Tamouridis Q and A
    « Reply #7 on: February 05, 2016, 06:41 »
    Hi Ioannis,

    Can you please tell us what your best and worst carrer moments during your Pro Tour year were?

    and one more if I may

    Do you see any Greek rider getting a contract with a Pro tour Team any time soon

    Thank you
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    Re: Ioannis Tamouridis Q and A
    « Reply #8 on: February 05, 2016, 07:34 »
    Hi Ioannis,

    Can you please tell us what your best and worst carrer moments during your Pro Tour year were?

    and one more if I may

    Do you see any Greek rider getting a contract with a Pro tour Team any time soon

    Thank you

    :welcome Papasmourf  :cool
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  • Evrisco WebStudio

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    Re: Ioannis Tamouridis Q and A
    « Reply #9 on: February 07, 2016, 16:39 »
    Hi Ioannis! Do you feel kind of responsible for the new generation of riders in Greece? I mean you're the first and only pro rider from Greece. What are your plans and actions for this experience of yours to become the continuity of the new Greek generation. Thanks and keep up your exceptional pro rider profile.
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: Ioannis Tamouridis Q and A
    « Reply #10 on: February 07, 2016, 20:19 »
    Hi Ioannis!
    Hi Evrisco! :welcome
    Feel free to have a look around; we cover lots of interesting topics.
    If you want to, you can introduce yourself here.
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    Re: Ioannis Tamouridis Q and A
    « Reply #11 on: February 07, 2016, 21:14 »
    Don't forget the poo question!
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    Re: Ioannis Tamouridis Q and A
    « Reply #12 on: February 07, 2016, 23:36 »
    My questions:

    In 2014 you planned to retire after that season and become a coach/DS for the SP Tableware team, mentoring younger Greek cyclists. What made you change your mind? Was it the team folding, or did you simply decide to keep riding for a while? Are you doing this mentoring/coaching nevertheless besides your own active riding, and if yes, what does it entail?

    2016 will be your second Olympics participation after 2012, both on the road. But you used to ride on the track too, a.o. got a World Champs silver medal in the points race in 2005 - when and why did you stop your track focus and switch purely to the road?

    You have ridden for a number of teams at various levels - from non-UCI teams when you were mostly a track rider (see above question) to a WorldTour squad in Euskaltel where you even rode and finished the Giro.
    What's the difference between a 2.2 race like the Tour of Hellas or Tour of Rhodes (or any other) and a WorldTour event like the Giro or the spring Monuments? How big are the differences - organisation, number of spectators, quality of hotels, race speed, race tactics, team support etc.?

    What does it take for a decent Continental rider to become competitive in a WorldTour race? Competitive not necessarily meaning "winning races", but able to fulfil his role for the team and finish the race without trouble. Can every Continental rider do it with a period of getting used to the higher level, or does it need more than just that? If it's not only about the riders' talent and ability: What, do you think, decides who makes it to the pro ranks and who doesn't? Connections, perseverance, sheer luck, something entirely different?
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  • just some guy

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    Re: Ioannis Tamouridis Q and A
    « Reply #13 on: February 15, 2016, 08:55 »
    *******

    Questions sent
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    Re: Ioannis Tamouridis Q and A
    « Reply #14 on: February 23, 2016, 11:38 »
    1st off thanks to Ioannis for taking the time and Susan Westemeyer for setting it up, their twitter accounts and the Baku teams are in the 1st post give ém a follow

    The answers from Ioannis are below, some of the questions were combined and changed slightly










    Q1 You started your pro career at SP Tableware which was probably Greece's top team until it ended in 2014. Since that year, there have been no teams at UCI CT level or above registered in Greece.As one of the most successful riders ever to come out of Greece, can you offer a brief survey of the sport in your country?
    This might include:
    Are there certain regions or clubs where the cycling infrastructure is well established?How has the financial crisis affected sponsorship opportunities?
    How do talented young riders today find their way to your level?



    Unfortunately in Greece cycling isn’t as developed as in Central Europe. There are no major sponsors, due to the economic crisis, to finance professional teams and big races. Nevertheless we have been experiencing a big increase in the number of amateur riders and races ,mainly in the masters and open categories. In the elite category, where the development should take place, the situation has remained unchanged for the last 20 years. The Tour of Greece, once an annual race,
    has been abandoned and apart from SP Tableware, no one tried to create a Continental Team in order to develop young Greek riders. This situation leads all young and ambitious Greek riders to try their luck abroad in countries where cycling is more developed, as for example, France.

    This is the only way to choose if you are a talented Greek cyclist nowadays.

    Q2 How were the 1st few months at Euskaltel ? Were you made welcome and part of the team, not just due to language, but culture and your sytle of racing verse the EE racing style ? And how would you compare Euskaltel to your current team in Baku

    It was by far the best experience of my life. It was a dream come true to be in a Pro Tour Team. The level of professionalism and the organization were out of the world for me. The team worked professionally, with so many people taking care of everything from our clothes, food and our bikes to the parts needed in every race, the team cars, the team truck, team bus etc.
    I was scared at first, since it was the first time the team had non-Basque team members, but I felt at home from the first moment. Speaking Spanish, which I improved a lot in the process, helped reinforce the bond with my teammates. I can safely say that I felt from the first moment as if I was a team member for ages. The same applies for Baku, where the team environment is like a family. Of course it is a Continental Team that has limited resources and different targets compared to a Pro Tour Team

    Q3 I'm sure you know that the Rio Olympic course is very tough and realistically a very small percentage of the peloton have a chance of getting anywhere near the podium, but do you still go into races like this with the mind frame of "I can win!" or do you set yourself other
    targets? Is finishing enough? Do you try and get in the break of the day and show off the Greek colours? And having won a Silver in the points
    race has the focus been on the road rather than the track? Best of luck anyway!


    I have the experience to understand that a medal in the Road Race in the Olympic Games is too much to ask. If the Points were still in the Olympic Games, then it would be a completely different story and I wouldn’t settle for anything less than a podium place.
    The profile of the race is such that even finishing is a tough task. The idea of joining the breakaway is something I am considering but then I have to settle with the fact that I might be able to reach the finish line.
    In any case my tactic will have to be decided at the last minute according to my form.

    Q4 Over your career so far ( more to come we hope ) you must have raced in some amazing countries How does say riding the Eneco Tour differ from say Azerbajdzjan or another country not from the traditional heart of cycling. Any crazy stories ?

    This is the beauty of cycling. Every race is a new experience. This is what keeps me at this sport so many years without any regrets. The European races are more prestigious and historic but subsequently more stressful. The heart of cycling lays in Europe in races like San Remo, Paris-Roubaix, the Giro d’Italia, all of which I was fortunate to race in my single Pro Tour year. On the other hand, races in Africa and in Asia may not have the history of the European races but they give you the opportunity to visit and experience unique, beautiful and exotic places that you wouldn’t otherwise have discovered.
    My biggest problem in these races was getting used to the local food.
    I remember some years ago in the Tour of Hainan that we had to sprint during the start of a hurricane, hardly reaching 30 km/h. We were very lucky to reach the finish line, because moments afterwards the hurricane destroyed everything.

    Q5 What do you typically eat for breakfast before an exhaustive training session?

    In the last couple of years I have switched from cereal to bread with honey or marmalade for a change. I usually eat 3-4 slices with tea and in the days of hard training I add an omelet with 3 eggs and turkey.



    Q6 Hi Ioannis,
    Can you please tell us what your best and worst carrer moments during your Pro Tour year were?
    and one more if I may
    Do you see any Greek rider getting a contract with a Pro tour Team any time soon Thank you


    I would say that I had mostly good moments and a few ugly. For me, this was living a  dream and trying to take the happiness from every race. Ending in snowy Sanremo, finishing the fastest Roubaix run in history, as well as the Giro d’Italia with some good finishes in the top 15 -- these were among my greatest rewards. It was the confirmation that I could be a valuable member of this system (Pro Tour), making a useful contribution to the team.. The worst moment was to hear that Euskatel would disband the following year because I believed that I would continue with even better results.
    In recent years, as indicated above, many young Greek athletes migrated to countries like France hoping to join professional teams. This move would be the only way they can realize their dreams. I did the same when I was 18, for 4 years training and racing in Italy before returning to Greece to focus on the track, especially the Points race. For our country to have a  unique presence at the Pro Tour level and for young Greek riders the contacts abroad and the faith in them is low. It takes a lot of effort, proving of oneself,  and dedication to find a suitable team. But I am optimistic, because they are proving that they have the talent and appetite for hard work.

    Q7 Hi Ioannis! Do you feel kind of responsible for the new generation of riders in Greece? I mean you're the first and only pro rider from Greece. What are your plans and actions for this experience of yours to become the continuity of the new Greek generation. Thanks and keep up your exceptional pro rider profile.

    This is true, I do feel responsible in some ways, and I have noticed  a positive  affect for many Greek athletes seeing opportunities given to me. . How did these opportunities come about? When I switched to the track I found  successes in the endurance disciplines such as the Points Race and Scratch. Then I went back to the road because the Points Race was removed from the Olympic program, I started getting successes to qualify for the London Olympics and opening the door for my involvement in Euskaltel, racing more and more on the road and fielding offers from teams abroad for a professional contract. What I am doing and will continue to do in the future is to transfer my racing knowledge and experiences to the young Greek riders so we can ensure more Greek athletes are found in professional teams.

    Q8In 2014 you planned to retire after that season and become a coach/DS for the SP Tableware team, mentoring younger Greek cyclists. What made you change your mind? Was it the team folding, or did you simply decide to keep riding for a while? Are you doing this mentoring/coaching nevertheless besides your own active riding, and if yes, what does it entail?

    The truth is that after Euskaltel I said I would stop. After riding at the Pro Tour level I wasn’t motivated to be back at the Continental level again. But I decided to go another 6 months to help my former team to win the National Championship and mentoring younger athletes through the races. Following the National Road Championship, which we won, I stopped and started as a coach (no DS) in the group. Parallel I started to practice my specialty as a coach with other athletes and teams. But in November 2014 I welcomed the proposal from Baku with great joy and restarted my preparation for 2015. At the same time I continue to train my athletes and I take great pleasure from it

    Q9You have ridden for a number of teams at various levels - from non-UCI teams when you were mostly a track rider (see above question) to a WorldTour squad in Euskaltel where you even rode and finished the Giro.What's the difference between a 2.2 race like the Tour of Hellas or Tour of Rhodes (or any other) and a WorldTour event like the Giro or the spring Monuments? How big are the differences - organisation, number of spectators, quality of hotels, race speed, race tactics, team support etc.?

    There is no comparison between the two groups of Continental and Pro Tour that would make sense. Pro Tour is much more demanding, well financed and supported in all facets. It’s different in almost every way, from the level of the athletes’ preparation for the targeted races, as well as the amount of stress to deliver results in those important races. The tactics and preparation are built on years of experience for teams and staff involved with a wealth of information available for the riders. The glamour and history of some of the Pro Tour races carry 100 years and more of tradition. As for the racers, you simply have to focus on being well trained at the right time, whatever else you need will be provided by the right team staff.

    Q10What does it take for a decent Continental rider to become competitive in a WorldTour race? Competitive not necessarily meaning "winning races", but able to fulfil his role for the team and finish the race without trouble. Can every Continental rider do it with a period of getting used to the higher level, or does it need more than just that?
    If it's not only about the riders' talent and ability: What, do you think, decides who makes it to the pro ranks and who doesn't? Connections, perseverance, sheer luck, something entirely different?


    Without the talent and the ability, you can not last for more than one year in the Pro Tour. If you are behind in performance, each race is torture that you simply hope to finish. But even athletes with huge talent need to be patient because a lot of times they need more than a year to get used to the fast pace, the longer stages, the amount of stages and for sure the completely different way the Pros race. For example, the biggest difference between the two levels is the pace in the mountains and the last 20-30kms where the speed is extremely high and all of that after 200km!!! Apart from talent and abilities, you need to have the whole package to remain at the Pro Tour level. Without connections and some luck, a mediocre athlete won’t be able to remain,  something that I experienced personally after Euskaltel closing. The champions will certainly find a place on a new team if something goes awry but others need a little luck, a lot of connections , and a good manager to persevere

    Thanks again Ioannis have a great year and good luck
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  • Synergy Baku

    Re: Ioannis Tamouridis Q and A
    « Reply #15 on: June 26, 2016, 20:21 »
    "Tamo" has justified being called the Greek God of Cycling. He won both the Greek national road and time trial titles!
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