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just some guy

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Giro d´Italia Big Preview
« on: March 29, 2016, 10:19 »




The Giro was first held in 1909, organised by the newspaper La Gazzetta dello Sport. That first edition was started by 127 riders, 49 of whom finished. Of those 49 the fastest was Luigi Ganna, winning 5325 lira in the process. Over the years that followed some experiments were held over how the winner would be named, including a points system was installed for 1910 and a team-based competition in 1912. In 1914, the time-based system as it currently stands was used again.

In the years after World War I, the race further developed. The decade following 1925 became the years of probably the first Italian superstar of cycling: Alfredo Binda. The man won a lot of different races: three world championships, two Milano-Sanremo's, and the Giro di Lombardia a further four times. The Giro was his biggest race though: he won 41 stages in total, including 12 in the 1927 edition. In total, he won a record five editions. During this time the Giro continued to grow. After the Binda years, a rivalry between two giants of Italian cycling started: Coppi and Bartali. The rivalry between the two divided Italy, but in the middle of those many wins by the two stars another significant event occurred: The Swiss Hugo Koblet became the first foreigner to win the Giro in 1950.

The years that followed saw many all-time great Giro riders. Eddy Merckx matched the record of Binda and Coppi by taking five wins, Hinault won three Giri, Andrew Hampsten became the first non-European winner. And meanwhile, the race continued to expand to become the huge event it is today.






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  • « Last Edit: May 01, 2016, 21:34 by just some guy »
    Of course, if this turns out someday to be the industry standard integrated handlebar-computer-braking solution then I'll eat my kevlar-reinforced aerodynamic hat.

    Larri Nov 12, 2014

    just some guy

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    Re: Giro dÍtalia Big Preview
    « Reply #1 on: March 29, 2016, 11:50 »
    Previous Winners

    Year Winner 2nd 3rd
    2015 Alberto Contador *es Fabio Aru *it Mikel Landa *es
    2014 Niaro Quintana *co Rigoberto Uran *co Fabio Aru *it
    2013Vincenzo Nibali *it Rigoberto Uran *co Cadel Evans *au
    2012 Ryder Hesjedal *ca Joaquim Rodriguez *es Thomas De Gendt *nl
    2011 Michele Scarponi *it Vincenzo Nibali *it John Gadret *fr
    2010 Ivan Basso *it David Arroyo *es Vincenzo Nibali *it
    2009 Denis Menchov *ru  Danilo Di Luca *it Franco Pellizotti *it
    2008 Alberto Contador *es Riccardo Ricco *it Marzio Bruseghin *it
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  • just some guy

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    Re: Giro dÍtalia Big Preview
    « Reply #2 on: March 29, 2016, 13:20 »
    GIRO D'ITALIA 2016
    Giro d’Italia will start for the 12th time from abroad. After the start from Netherlands with an individual time trial and two flat stages, it will restart from Catanzaro. At the stage 6 the 1st uphill finish. In this edition there will be no team time trial. After the first one, other two individual time trial: Chianti Classico stage and the uphill time trial of Castelrotto. There will be a great return on the Dolomites which will open a week of emotions on the mountains.

    GIRO NUMBERS
    3.383,0 KM
    TOTAL ROUTE

    161,1 KM
    EACH DAY AVERAGE

    3INDIVIDUAL
    TIME TRIAL

    7STAGES FOR
    SPRINTERS

    7MEDIUM MOUNTAIN
    STAGES

    4HIGH MOUNTAIN
    STAGES


    THE ROUTE
    The first three stages take place in the Dutch Province of Gelderland. The race starts on Friday 6 May with a 9.8km Individual Time Trial around Apeldoorn, starting in the famous velodrome. Two flat stages follow: Arnehm to Nijmegen (190km) and Nijmegen to Arnhem (189km).
    The riders and race officials fly to Catanzaro in the south of Italy on Monday 10 May. Stage 4, Catanzaro to Praia a Mare (191km), sees the first climbing of the race. Stage 5, Praia a Mare to Benevento, 233km along the coast of the Tyrrhenian Sea, may very well end in a bunch sprint, while Stage 6, Ponte to Roccaraso (Aremogna), 165km, has the first mountain finish of the 2016 Corsa Rosa. Stage 7, Sulmona to Foligno, holds 210 hilly kilometres in store, while Stage 8, Foligno to Arezzo (Saturday 14 May), tackles two imposing climbs, the second of which, Alpe di Poti, features gravel roads for the final 6km.
    Sunday 15 May sees the Chianti Classico Individual Time Trial over 40.4 extremely difficult kilometres, without so much as a metre of flat road.
    The second rest day takes place on Monday 16 May at Campi Bisenzio, the start town for stage 10, which ends after 216km at Sestola, with the second mountain finish of the race. Stage 11 starts in Modena and finishes in Asolo (212km). The following stage, Noale to Bibione, is entirely flat.
    A long weekend of epic climbing starts on Friday 20 May. Stage 13, from Palmanova to Cividale del Friuli, presents four monstrously hard climbs that have never before featured in the Giro d’Italia: Montemaggiore, Crai, Cima Porzus and Valle. Saturday 21 May sees the return of the legendary Dolomite stage from Alpago to Corvara via Passo Pordoi, Passo Sella, Passo Gardena, Passo Campolongo, Passo Giau and Passo Valparola. The third and last Individual Time Trial of the race takes place on Sunday 22 May: in the event, a 10.8km Mountain Time Trial from Castelrotto/Kastelruth to Alpe di Siusi.
    The final rest day is at Bressanone/Brixen on Monday 23 May. The following day, Stage 16 leaves for Andalo via the ascents of Passo della Mendola and Fai della Paganella. Stage 17, Molveno to Cassano d’Adda, will suit the fast finishers, while Stage 18 – at 234km, the longest of the 2016 Giro – takes the peloton from Muggiò to Pinerolo – with the Pramartino climb in the final kilometres.
    Friday 27 May sees the Giro cross the border into France between Pinerolo and the stage finish at Risoul. The route includes the Cima Coppi, or highest point, of the Giro d’Italia, the Colle dell’Agnello, at 2,744 metres, and then the high mountain finish at the French ski resort of Risoul. The final Saturday sees the penultimate and probably decisive stage from Guillestre to Sant’Anna di Vinadio, with four climbs: Col de Vars, Col de la Bonnette, Colle della Lombarda and the short final ramp up to the finish line. The final stage, on Sunday 29 May, starting at Cuneo and finishing in the 2015 European Capital of Sport, Turin, is essentially a showcase for the winner.




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  • just some guy

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    Re: Giro d´Italia Big Preview
    « Reply #3 on: March 29, 2016, 13:31 »
    Giro d’Italia 2016: route in detail

    Friday May 6: stage one – Apeldoorn to Apeldoorn, 9,8km individual time trial

    This individual time trial runs entirely within Apeldoorn, from the Omnisportcentrum (indoor velodrome) to the opposite side of the city, near the Paleis Het Loo (royal palace). The route is fast, with only a few bends. It runs along wide, straight tree-lined avenues, with just a short stretch featuring a series of close turns while approaching the intermediate time-recording point.







    Saturday May 7: stage two – Arnhem to Nijmegen, 180km

    The first massed-start stage along the plains of the province of Gelderland. The course runs initially through the Veluwe National Park, leading to the Rhine river, which the route crosses several time. The final part of the stage runs up and down the hills in Berg-en-Dal, to tackle the first KoM-climb of the Giro, a 1-km wall, leading to Nijmegen. Here, an 8.6-km circuit will be covered twice, and the stage will most likely end in a sprint.











    Sunday May 8: stage three – Nijmegen to Arnhem 179km

    Over the first 25 km, the route winds its way along the banks of river Rhine, where wind will be the major challenge. The stage course then enters the Arnhem plain and the Veluwe Park, rolling up and down the hills leading to today’s categorized climb, and then heads to the final 13.8-km city circuit. Here, the route is slightly wavier, but the final part will call for a bunch sprint.












    Monday May 9: transfer to Italy, rest day one
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  • « Last Edit: May 03, 2016, 09:28 by just some guy »

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    Re: Giro d´Italia Big Preview
    « Reply #4 on: March 29, 2016, 13:39 »
    Tuesday May 10: stage four – Catanzaro to Praia a Mare, 191km

    Here is the first Italian stage of the 2016 Giro. The route is divided into two parts: the first 120 kilometres run basically flat and fast from Catanzaro to the Tyrrhenian coast, following the shoreline up to the final 70 km, and then tackling the Bonifati and San Pietro di Maierà climbs. Short yet sharp stretches are packed over the last 15 km, promoting possible attacks for a stage win. Praia a Mara will be for the first time a Giro d'Italia finish.












    Wednesday May 11: stage five – Praia a Mare to Benevento, 233km

    This is a very long stage, and sprinters will definitely have to earn the final kick along a wavy and fast-running course (over 200 km). The route leading the peloton to Benevento starts with the Fortino climb, enters the province of Salerno and runs through Irpinia. In Benevento, a final circuit measuring a little more than 6 km is likely to lead to a bunch sprint. Benevento is arrival for the 7th time, the first was in 1929 with a triumph of Girardengo, the last in 2009. In this occasion Michele Scarpoini got the victory.










    Thursday May 12: stage six – Ponte to Roccaraso, 165km summit finish

    Here is the first summit finish. The stage is wavy; the route starts uphill, to clear the Torrecuso climb straight away, leading to Bojano and then to Isernia after rolling past Telese Terme, Cusano Mutri and Bocca di Selva. A short climb in Rionero Sannitico leads to the concluding ascent, from Castel di Sangro to the finish in Roccaraso-Aremogna. The final climb – especially the second half – has “feasible” gradients. This stage will mark a first selection of the favourites. Giro d'italia comes to Roccaraso after 29 years: in 1987 Moreno Argentin won the stage from Rieti to Roccaraso









    Friday May 13: stage seven – Sulmona to Foligno, 210km

    This is a sprinters’ stage, just like the one finishing in Benevento. The fastest riders will have to make it to the finish after clearing a few climbs in the first part of the route, across the province of L’Aquila, and the mountains in the province of Rieti. The route will grow faster and faster past Rieti, culminating in a final sprint in the city of the “Quintana” (a traditional jousting tournament). The last sprinter who took the victory to Foligno is Nacer Bouhanni in the Giro d'Italia 2014, 2nd Giacomo Nizzolo and 3rd Luka Mezgec.









    Saturday May 14: stage eight – Foligno to Arezzo, 169km

    This is a tricky medium-mountain stage. The route runs flat up to the province of Arezzo, where a more undulating part begins. The route clears the Rassinata climb and takes a first pass over the finish; then, after running through the centre of Arezzo, it takes a first-ever pass over Alpe di Poti. The gradients are not extreme, but the last 6 km run on dirt road, and will be decisive. The route then drops straight into the finish line in Arezzo, for the 12th time arrival of a stage. in 2003 was Mario Cipollini the leader of a great sprint.












    Sunday May 15: stage nine – Radda in Chianti to Greve in Chianti, 40.4km individual time trial

    This is the first of the Giro’s “key stages”, with not a single level stretch, but a never-ending sequence of climbs and descents among the Consorzio del Chianti Classico vineyards. Riders will be facing harsh uphill slants and steep downhill gradients where they will need to push down on the pedals, especially in the stage finale.







    Monday May 16: rest day two
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  • « Last Edit: April 27, 2016, 10:58 by just some guy »

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    Re: Giro d´Italia Big Preview
    « Reply #5 on: March 29, 2016, 13:40 »
    Tuesday May 17: stage ten – Campi Bisenzio to Sestola, 216km sf

    After the first 25 km, this mountain stage does not even feature a single flat metre. Just past Pistoia, the route climbs up Passo della Collina and across the Tuscan-Emilian Apennines. After dropping quickly into Porretta Terme, the route climbs up again to tackle the Pietracolora categorised climb, leading into Valle del Samone. A short flat sector follows, leading to Marano sul Panaro. Here the route starts to climb and descend constantly over 70 km, all the way up to the Pian del Falco KOM. The final part of the climb features long stretches with double-digit gradients. The last 15 km  comprise a fast and technical descent that leads from the KOM summit to Fanano. The descent can be divided into two quite steep parts: the first one runs on large roads, with just a few bends, and leads into a second one where the road is narrower at points, and which twists and turns all the way up into urban Fanano. Next on the route is the final 7-km climb, with gradients of 5-6%, on a wide yet winding road that leads into the final 100-m long, uphill home straight, on 6.5-m wide asphalt road









    Wednesday May 18: stage 11 – Modena to Asolo, 212km

    The stage is clearly divided into two parts: the first one runs flat from Modena to just before Asolo (approx. 200 km), while the second one is wavier and more challenging, leading into the finish. The route runs across the entire Po Plain, partly on narrow roads, and partly on wide and mainly straight roads. Beware of roundabouts, kerbs, speed bumps and traffic dividers while crossing urban areas. Just past Maser, the road tackles a short yet very harsh climb up Forcella Mostaccin (with gradients topping out at 16%), followed by a technical descent (narrowed at points) leading to the Monfumo hills and to Castelcucco. Here, a series of undulations will lead to the final Asolo climb. Five kilometres before the finish, the road climbs up towards Asolo along a 1-km ramp with gradients of approx. 7% that leads into the old town centre through a mediaeval gateway and on a setts-paved stretch. A quick descent on wide roads follows, up to the final km. The last bend is 900 m from the finish line, followed by a long home straight, just bending slightly, on 7.5-m wide and perfectly level asphalt road. Asolo has been stage finish in 2010, Vincenzo Nibali won that time











    Thursday May 19: stage 12 – Noale to Bibione, 168km
    The stage course is perfectly flat and runs almost entirely along wide and straight roads. Initially, the route follows the Riviera del Brenta, then it enters the province of Treviso along trunk roads. Beware of roundabouts, kerbs, speed bumps and traffic dividers while crossing urban areas, especially in Mestre, Treviso and Portogruaro. The route finally reaches Bibione, where an 8-km circuit shall be covered twice. A circuit features 14 bends and long straight stretches, on mostly wide and well-surfaced roads. The home straight is 300 m long, on 7.5-m wide asphalt road. Bibione has been Five time finish of a stage in the Giro d'Italia history, the last one in 2000.












    Friday May 20: stage 13 – Palmanova to Cividale del Friuli, 161km sf
    This is a very challenging mountain stage. The route takes in 4 categorised climbs in a row, with just a few stretches to let the bunch catch their breath. The first 45 km run on apparently flat ground, and are followed by three typical pre-Alpine climbs, marked by narrow roadway, high gradients and endless turns, both while climbing and while descending. After a flat drag including a passage over the finish line, the route heads towards the two final climbs in Porzùs and Valle, with a very winding and undulating profile, and high uphill gradients. The road narrows at point while crossing urban areas. The route features some technical descents, especially when climbing down form Passo San Martino at km 67.The last 5 km are deceptively flat and actually run downhill all the way to Cividale del Friuli. The route features a few twists and turns over the last 1,000 m; the home straight is on 7-m wide asphalt road.















    Saturday May 21: stage 14 – Alpago to Corvara, 210km sf
    Over the last 150 km of this queen stage across the Dolomites, 6 passes will be climbed, for a total rise and drop of 4,700 m (out of 5,400). The route runs across the Val Cordevole along well-surfaced roads, all the way to Arabba. Here, the route clears Passo Pordoi, followed by Passo Sella and Passo Gardena (with not even a single flat metre in between), and heads for the first pass over the finish line in Corvara (intermediate sprint). The road then climbs up Passo Campolongo, Passo Giau (the harshest climb of the stage, with an average 9% gradients, and peaks of more than 10-12% over the first kilometres) and Passo Valparola, which leads to the final 5 km.  The route clears Muro del Gatto (360 m, with gradients ranging from 13 to 19%), and then drops down into the trunk road leading to Corvara, still climbing slightly (average slope: 2-3%). The last bend is 150 m from the finish line.  Passo Sella is the Pantani mountain of this Giro d'italia, to remember his feat with Giuseppe Guerini the June 3rd, 1998. In that occasion he crossed Passo Sella to arrive to the finish line of Selva di Val Gardena and to get the Maglia Rosa.

















    Sunday May 22: stage 15 – Castelrotto to Alpe di Siusi, 10.8km individual time trial


    The stage is an uphill individual time trial. After a first false-flat drag (1,800 m), the route climbs steadily over the next 9 km, with an average 8.3% gradient. The road is wide and well paved. Straight stretches alternate with hairpins having a high bend radius. Split time is taken at km 4.4. The final kilometres run entirely uphill, with constant slopes (avg. gradient: 8.0%, max. gradient: 11%), and on wide, well-paved roads. The route takes in a series of hairpins in the stage finale. The finish line lies at the end of a 180-m long and 6-m wide asphalt home straight.








    Monday May 23: rest day three
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  • « Last Edit: April 27, 2016, 11:00 by just some guy »

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    Re: Giro d´Italia Big Preview
    « Reply #6 on: March 29, 2016, 13:40 »
    Tuesday May 24: stage 16 – Bressanone Brixen to Andalo, 133km sf
    The stage is short, yet it features long climbs and descents. Over the first 40 km, the route runs initially downhill (although the road is deceptively flat) until past Bolzano (intermediate sprint). Here, after clearing the Mendel Pass climb, the road takes a long, undulating descent leading to the foot of the final ascent. The climb is divided in two parts, the first one leading to Fai della Paganella (categorised climb), and the second one running all the way up to the finish. 200 metres before the summit, in the urban area of Fai della Paganella, the climb gradient peaks as high as 15%. The final 10 km are clearly divided into two halves: first a fast-running descent (4 km) on wide roads with sharp downhill gradients, then a mild climb (6 km), growing steeper, up to 2 km from the finish. Next comes a false-flat uphill drag. The finish line lies on an 80-m long and 7.0-m wide asphalt home stretch, running gently uphill. Andalo was stage finish also in 1973, with the triumph of Eddy Merckx. 











    Wednesday May 25: stage 17 – Molveno to Cassano d’Adda, 196km

    The first half of the stage is wavy, while the second half is perfectly flat. The route rolls along moderate undulations all the way up to km 120 (Brescia), where the road eventually levels out. Beware of a few tunnels in the first part. In the flat sector, roads are relatively wide and straight, with just a few curvier stretches. Roundabouts, speed bumps and traffic dividers are the main obstacles typically found in urban areas. The final 5 km are perfectly flat, with two mild bends and one (last) turn 600 m before the finish, on 7-m wide asphalt road. Roundabouts, speed bumps and traffic islands are the main obstacles, as found throughout the stage course.









    Thursday May 26: stage 18 – Muggio to Pinerolo, 234km


    Flat for 170 km, this stage will have a more challenging finale. The route initially runs across the entire northwestern Po Plain, from Milano to Torino, along mainly straight and wide roads. The stage course cuts across a few major cities, where the common traffic calming devices will be found. After reaching Pinerolo (and clearing Colletta di Cumiana), the route takes a first pass over the finish line, climbs up the steep Via dei Principi d’Acaja stretch, tackles the Pramartino climb and goes back to Pinerolo. 2,500 m before the finish, the route turns left and climbs up Via Principi d’Acaja (average 14% gradient and peaks of 20%, on setts-paved and narrow road). Next is a steep and harsh descent leading into Pinerolo. The last 1,500 m run on level roads, with just a few bends and a short stretch on stone-slab paving.  Pinerolo is  stage finish for the sixth time in the Giro d'Italia history. The first one was in 1949 with a great victory of Fausto Coppi.









    Friday May 27: stage 19 – Pinerolo to Risoul, 161km sf
    This is a high mountain stage featuring a summit finish, and “home” to the Cima Coppi. The route runs constantly uphill (on deceptively flat roads) over 80 km, all the way up to Casteldelfino. Here the road starts to climb up Colle dell’Agnello (Cima Coppi, 2744 m). The following 40 km run mostly downhill and lead to Guillestre, at the foot of the final climb. Beware of a few tunnels around km 135. The last 13 km run entirely uphill, with an average 7% gradient and 15 hairpins. The roadway is very wide and well surfaced. The home straight, 150 m in length, on 6-m wide asphalt road, has an 8% uphill gradient. The winner of this stage, that includes the Cima Coppi, will receive the Trofeo Torriani.










    Saturday May 28: stage 20 – Guillestre to Sant’Anna di Vinadio, 134km sf
    This short queen stage across the Alps features a remarkable 4,100 m rise and drop in as little as 134 km, with a sequence of 4 climbs and 3 descents and not even a single flat stretch in between. The route climbs up Col de Vars (19 km), Col de la Bonette (22 km), Col de la Lombarde (20 km) and the final 2.3 km leading to the Sant’Anna Sanctuary. The road is wide and well-surfaced along all of the climbs (mostly above 2,000 m), with many hairpins. The roadway only narrows along the technical descent from Col de la Lombarde, all the way up to the last 2.3 km. The route climbs steadily over the last 2,300 m, with gradients ranging from 9% to 11%. The road is quite narrow, with a few hairpins. The last few hundred metres of the route run among the Sanctuary’s buildings, with short uphill stretches and tight bends











    Sunday May 29: stage 21 – Cuneo to Turin, 150km


    he route starts in Cuneo, runs through Borgo San Dalmazzo and then heads towards Torino, leaving Cuneo to the south-east. The stage course runs along wide and straight trunk roads across the plain, all the way up to Torino, where a final circuit shall be covered 8 times. The final 7.5-km circuit runs almost entirely along the right bank of the Po River. After passing over the finish line, the route runs around the Chiesa della Gran Madre and then tackles the only short climb of the stage, leading to Villa della Regina . Next, a fast-running descent leads into Corso Moncalieri, and then to the other bank of River Po. Here, the route passes under Ponte Balbis, enters Parco del Valentino and runs across the park up to the red flag. In the last 1,000 m, two bends before and after Ponte Umberto I lead into the 600-m long home stretch, on 8-m wide asphalt road. For the 41st time in the Giro d'Italia history, Torino will be stage finish of the Corsa Rosa.










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  • « Last Edit: April 27, 2016, 11:24 by just some guy »

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    « Last Edit: April 26, 2016, 09:50 by just some guy »

    just some guy

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    Re: Giro d´Italia Big Preview
    « Reply #8 on: March 30, 2016, 07:50 »
    RiderNatTeam
     #ag2r *fr AG2R La Mondiale:*
    POZZOVIVO Domenico *it
    BONNAFOND Guillaume *fr
    DOMONT Axel *fr
    DUPONT Hubert *fr
    GRETSCH Patrick *de
    HOULE Hugo *ca
    KADRI Blel *fr
    MONTAGUTI Matteo *it
    PERAUD Jean-Christophe *fr
    RiderNatTeam
    #astana *kz Astana Pro cycling:*
    NIBALI Vincenzo *it
    AGNOLI Valerio *it
    CAPECCHI Eros *it
    FUGLSANG Jakob *dk
    KANGERT Tanel *ee
    KOZHATAYEV Bakhtiyar *kz
    MALACARNE Davide *it
    SCARPONI Michele *it
    ZEITS Andrey *kz
    RiderNatTeam
    #bardiani *it Bardiani - CSF :*
    PIRAZZI Stefano *it
    ANDREETTA Simone *it
    SIMION Paolo *it
    BOEM Nicola *it
    BONGIORNO Francesco Manuel *it
    CICCONE Giulio *it
    COLBRELLI Sonny *it
    MAESTRI Mirco *it
    RUFFONI Nicola *it
    RiderNatTeam
    #bmc *usa BMC Racing Team:*
    SENNI Manuel *it
    ATAPUMA John Darwin *co
    DE MARCHI Alessandro *it
    DILLIER Silvan *ch
    KÜNG Stefan *ch
    OSS Daniel *it
    QUINZIATO Manuel *it
    ROSSKOPF Joey *usa
    ZABEL Rick *de
    RiderNatTeam
    #cannondale *usa Cannondale:*
    URAN Rigoberto *co
    CARDOSO André *pt
    CLARKE Simon *au
    DOMBROWSKI Joe *usa
    FORMOLO Davide *it
    MOSER Moreno *it
    NAVARDAUSKAS Ramunas *lt
    BETTIOL Alberto *it
    BROWN Nathan *usa
    RiderNatTeam
    #dimension *zaDimension Data:*
    ANTON Igor *es
    FRAILE Omar *es
    SONGEZO Jim *za
    KUDUS Merhawi *er
    SBARAGLI Kristian *za
    SIUTSOU Kanstantsin *by
    THOMSON Jay Robert *za
    VAN ZYL Johann *za
    VENTER Jaco *za
    RiderNatTeam
    #etixx *beEtixx-Quick Step:*
    JUNGELS Bob *lu
    BRAMBILLA Gianluca *it
    DE LA CRUZ David *es
    KITTEL Marcel *de
    SABATINI Fabio *it
    SERRY Pieter *be
    TRENTIN Matteo *it
    VERONA Carlos *es
    WIŚNIOWSKI Łukasz *pl
    RiderNatTeam
    #fdj *fr FDJ.fr:*
    DÉMARE Arnaud *fr
    COURTEILLE Arnaud *fr
    DELAGE Mickaël *fr
    FISCHER Murilo Antonio *br
    GENIEZ Alexandre *fr
    KONOVALOVAS Ignatas *lt
    LE GAC Olivier *fr
    SARREAU Marc *fr
    VAUGRENARD Benoit *fr
    RiderNatTeam
    #gazprom *ru Gazprom-RusVelo:*
    KOLOBNEV Alexandr *ru
    RYBALKIN Aleksey *ru
    ERSHOV Artur *ru
    FIRSANOV Sergey *ru
    FOLIFOROV Alexander *ru
    OVECHKIN Artem *ru
    SAVITSKIY Ivan *ru
    SEROV Alexander *ru
    SOLOMENNIKOV Andrei *ru
    RiderNatTeam
    #iam *ch IAM Cycling:*
    PELUCCHI Matteo *it
    BRÄNDLE Matthias *at
    HAUSSLER Heinrich *au
    HOWARD Leigh *au
    KLUGE Roger *de
    DENIFL Stefan *at
    WARBASSE Larry *usa
    WYSS Marcel *ch
    LAENGEN Vegard Stake *no
    RiderNatTeam
    #lampre *it Lampre-Merida:*
    ULISSI Diego *it
    CONTI Valerio *it
    FERRARI Roberto *it
    KOSHEVOY Ilia *by
    MODOLO Sacha *it
    MOHORIC Matej *si
    MORI Manuele *it
    NIEMIEC Przemyslaw *pl
    PETILLI Simone *it
    RiderNatTeam
    #lotto *be Lotto-Soudal :*
    WELLENS Tim *be
    BAK Lars Ytting *dk
    DE BIE Sean *be
    GREIPEL André *de
    HANSEN Adam *au
    LIGTHART Pim *be
    MONFORT Maxime *be
    ROELANDTS Jurgen *be
    VANENDERT Jelle *be
    RiderNatTeam
    #movistar *esMovistar:*
    VALVERDE Alejandro *es
    AMADOR Andrey *cr
    BETANCUR Carlos *co
    HERRADA José *es
    MORENO Javier *es
    ROJAS José Joaquín *es
    SUTHERLAND Rory *au
    SÜTTERLIN Jasha *de
    VISCONTI Giovanni *it
    RiderNatTeam
    #nippo *it Nippo - Vini Fantini :*
    CUNEGO Damiano *it
    BERLATO Giacomo *it
    BISOLTI Alessandro *it
    BOLE Grega *si
    DE NEGRI Pier Paolo *it
    FILOSI Iuri *it
    GROSU Eduard Michael *ro
    STACCHIOTTI Riccardo *it
    ZILIOLI Gianfranco *it
    RiderNatTeam
    #greenedge *au Orica-Greenedge:*
    CHAVES Johan Esteban *co
    BEWLEY Sam *nz
    EWAN Caleb *au
    HEPBURN Michael *au
    HOWSON Damien *au
    MEZGEC Luka *si
    PLAZA Rubén *es
    TUFT Svein *ca
    TXURRUKA Amets *es
    RiderNatTeam
    #giant *de Giant-Alpecin :*
    DUMOULIN Tom *nl
    ARNDT Nikias *de
    DE BACKER Bert *be
    HAGA Chad *usa
    JI Cheng *cn
    LUDVIGSSON Tobias *se
    REIDLER Georg *at
    STAMSNIJDER Tom *nl
    TIMMER Albert *nl
    RiderNatTeam
    #katusha *ru Team Katusha:*
    TAARAMÄE Rein *ee
    BELKOV Maxim *ru
    KOCHETKOV Pavel *ru
    KUZNETSOV Viacheslav *ru
    VOROBYEV Anton *ru
    PORSEV Alexander *ru
    SILIN Egor *ru
    TSATEVICH Alexey *ru
    ZAKARIN Ilnur *ru
    RiderNatTeam
    #jumbo *nl Team LottoNL - Jumbo:*
    KRUIJSWIJK Steven *nl
    BATTAGLIN Enrico *it
    HOFLAND Moreno *nl
    CASTELIJNSTwan *nl
    KEIZER Martijn *nl
    ROGLIČ Primož *si
    TANKINK Bram *nl
    TJALLINGII Maarten *nl
    VAN EMDEN Jos *nl
    RiderNatTeam
    #sky *gb Team Sky:*
    LANDA Mikel *es
    BOSWELL Ian *usa
    DEIGNAN Philip *ie
    HENAO Sebastián *co
    NIEVE Mikel *es
    KNEES Christian *de
    LOPEZ David *es
    ROCHE Nicolas *ie
    VIVIANI Elia *it
    RiderNatTeam
    #tinkoff *ru Tinkoff:*
    MAJKA Rafał *pl
    BOARO Manuele *it
    BRUTT Pavel *ru
    HERNÁNDEZ Jesús *es
    MCCARTHY Jay *au
    POLJANSKI Pawel *pl
    ROVNY Ivan *ru
    PETROV Evgeni *ru
    TOSATTO Matteo *it
    RiderNatTeam
    #trek *usa Trek - Segafredo:*
    HESJEDAL Ryder *ca
    ALAFACI Eugenio *it
    BOBRIDGE Jack *au
    CANCELLARA Fabian *ch
    COLEDAN Marco *it
    DIDIER Laurent *lu
    NIZZOLO Giacomo *it
    VAN POPPEL Boy *nl
    ZOIDL Riccardo *at
    RiderNatTeam
    #southeast *it Wilier - Southeast:*
    POZZATO Filippo *it
    AMEZQUETA Julen *es
    BELLETTI Manuel *it
    BERTAZZO Liam *it
    BUSATO Matteo *it
    RODRÍGUEZ Cristian *es
    MARECZKO Jakub *it
    MARTINEZ Daniel Felipe *co
    ZHUPA Eugert *al


    Key :* confirmed team but Startlist not 100% confirmed until race starts of course
  • ReplyReply
  • « Last Edit: May 03, 2016, 14:55 by just some guy »

    AG

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    Re: Giro d´Italia Big Preview
    « Reply #9 on: April 27, 2016, 11:44 »
    The Fight for Pink   

     


    Well spring is over for another year - and what a spring it was.  The cobbles delivered this year ... in a way they havent for a few years now.  Can the giro live up to its oft-voted 'Best Grand Tour' reputation?

    The Route is set, the field is set, the weather has been ... well .... interesting for a few races now so the riders should be well used to the cold and wintery conditions that il Giro has been known to deliver.

    So - who will walk away with the pink jersey?

    The main Contenders

    #pink #pink #pink #pink #pink Vincenzo Nibali
    His palmares is pretty impressive.  He has a trophy from each of the 3 grand tours on his mantle, as well as at least one other podium in each race and a bunch of stage wins, a mountains jersey at the 2013 Giro (that he won).  He has 2 national champs jerseys, was as high as 4th in the Worlds in Firenze, a Giro di Lombardia win .... Tireno Adriatico, Giro del Trentino, Tour de San Luis and a bunch of other stage races also - there isnt too much that Nibali hasnt done.

    On the other side, he has before turned up to races considerably out of form, and done incredibly poorly.  He has never won Romandie, Dauphine, Suisse, Paris Nice or some of the other traditional 'lead up' races where most of the major players tend to be in form for.   

    This year he won the Tour of Oman - but has been very quiet thus far.  Not in great shape in Trentino a couple of weeks ago but has been doing altitude training and setting himself for this race.  He didnt ride Liege Bastogne Liege to win this year, which is unusual especially as it was very cold conditions which Nibali tends to like.   

    will be interesting to see which Nibali turns up here.

    The course seems to suit him well enough - he can climb, he can TT, he can certainly do a good Mountain TT and the cold weather will suit him just fine.

    #pink #pink #pink #pink #pink Alejandro Valverde
    A pretty impressive palmares here too - though he has never ridden the giro so will be a lovely new experience for him this year.  His only Grand Tour win was the 2009 Vuelta, though he has also been 2nd twice and 3rd three times in Spain.  3rd last year in Paris is his highest Tour de France place and is his only podium in that race.

    He has an incredible record in the classics though, and a good record for 1 week stage races. 

    So far this year Valverde won the Vuelta Castilla y Leon and the Vuelta a Andalucia, as well as winning Fleche Wallone last week, so brings good form to Italy ... though less than the absolute raging form he usually has by this time.

    Valverde can certainly time trial well, and he will need to with a prologue, a 40km bumpy ITT and a 10.8km Mountain TT ... but the very long steep climbs can sometimes be his undoing, so how he will go against the pure climbers will be an interesting one.  Still, he is good enough to rate 5 jerseys


    #pink #pink #pink #pink  Michel Landa
    3rd here last year, new team and high hopes for Landa here.   He was incredibly strong last year, but was 2nd in the team pecking order behind Fabio Aru, and with Astana picking battles against Tinkoff, Landa seemed to be an afterthought for them last year.

    this year though, he is Sky's number 1 - and they will back him with a goodish team including Christian Knees, David Lopez and Nico Roche to work for him. 

    His palmares isnt that great thus far.  He came to the pro peleton in 2011 with Euskatel, went to Astana for 14+15 and moved to Sky this year.  He rode the Vuelta each year from 2012 - with 25 his highest finish there.  Last year was his second Giro, (34th in 2014) and his 2 stage wins were the only significant results he has achieved. His 3rd place was an incredible surprise to everyone, though he had done well in Trentino coming into the race.

    This year - he comes having won the overall and the mountains jersey at Trentino and a stage of the Basque Country.

    His timetrialling ability may be an issue here, but the prologue is short, the main ITT is very bumpy and the MTT will suit him well so it may be ok. 

    #pink #pink #pink  Rafael Majka
    I have only given him 3 jerseys here as I dont think he is in quite the same league as the others.

    Still - for a young man his palmares over the last 2 years is impressive.  He burst onto the scene in 2012 with a 7th in the Giro and followed that up with a 4th at the tour of Poland and 3rd in the one day Tour of Lombardia.

    2014 was his breakthrough year where he was 6th at the Giro ... went on to do the Tour de France at the insistance of the team even though he publicly said he didnt want to - and won 2 stages and the KOM jersey.  2015 he won a stage of the Tour but lost a bunch of time to finish 28th overall ... but backed up with 3rd at the Vuelta - his first GT podium.

    Question is - is he good enough to take the next step here?   His climbing is very good, but can he last the 3 weeks, and is his TT skills up to a 40km TT ?



    #pink #pink #pink   Tom Dumoulin
    Until last year no one was seriously considering Dumoulin as a GT contender.  he had a 2nd at the Eneco Tour, nad 2nd in the Tour of Belgium and a 5th at the Tour de Suisse as well as a bronze in the World TT Champs - but had only ridden 2 GT's (both around France) and finished out of the top 30 both times.

    Last year he was 3rd at the Tour de Suisse and 4th Down Under before crashing out of the Tour.  He went to the Vuelta with no real expectations, and was a revelation there - wearing red for a considerable time, and only losing it to eventual winner Aru on the last mountain.

    His Mountain climbing isnt up to matching the likes of Nibali, Valverde or Majka, but he is far and away the best TT'er in the field and will gain a lot of time in the ITT as well as in the prologue. 

    He hasnt been in sparkling form so far this year though, so we will have to wait and see

    #pink #pink #pink   Rigoburto Uran
    Has always promised, but never really delivered.  Even his 2 second places here at the Giro were somewhat underwhelming.  He never challenged Nibali for the lead in 2013 and only just managed to beat and old and tiring Evans, and the year after with Quintana he was well outclassed.

    He has aside from those 2 Giro podiums had some other good results over the years.  An Olympic silver medal, 3rd at Tirreno Adriatico, 3rd in Lombardia, 5th at Romandie and a bunch ofothers.  He has oft been the team leader in an anonymous top 10 position at various week long and one day races.

    His TT skills are good - he will no doubt hold his own there, but whether he can manage a podium here, or have another top 10 whilst never really contending is the major question


    #pink #pink #pink   Domenico Pozzovivo
    Always a chance at the Giro.  His TT skills will cause him difficulties (though the MTT will be fine) but his climbing skills are significantly better than those of Dumoulin and Uran so he may make some of that back.

    Would be nice to see after a horrible crash last year

    #pink #pink   Ryder Hesjedal
    A surprise winner here in 2012 he has not risen to those heights since - so only a 2 jersey rating.  More likely to go for breakaways or stage wins, though his TT skills are better than some of the other contenders.   He did manage 5th here last year, but was a long way back from the real players.

    #pink #pink   Andrey Amador
    May be hoping to fight it out for a mid range top 10 position.  Will depend on how things go with Valverde as he may be called upon to do too much work to hope for a GC place of his own.

    #pink #pink   Leopold Konig
    promised much before his move to Sky - can really only see him working for Landa here. 

    #pink #pink   Steven Kruijswijk
    His riding in a few of those stages last year were epic.  Never give up.  Never say die.  His attitude is second to none.   Still - he would be hoping for a top 10 here.

    #pink #pink   Jean Christoph Peraud
    A surprise podium in the Tour .. but really even that was only because some of the major players crashed out.  2 jerseys is a generous rating

    #pink   Esteban Chavez
    Great Clmbing.  Not so great TT'ing will mean his GC chances here may be limited.  Still - he is a GC contender in the making and this will be a good learning curve for the smiling one


    #pink Rein Taramae
    Can climb.  Can climb very well.   Has never really taken it further than that though

    #pink    Damiano Cunego
    Had to give him a jersey for old times sake. 
  • ReplyReply
  • « Last Edit: April 29, 2016, 13:09 by AG »

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    Re: Giro d´Italia Big Preview
    « Reply #10 on: May 01, 2016, 19:06 »
    #red Classifica a punti

    The former Maglia Ciclamino for the winner of the Giro d'Italia points classification turned red in 2010, and despite the fact, that he have seen battles between riders as different as they could be, last year the organizers decided to change the points system a couple of years ago and not to award the same amount of points for every stage anymore. Stages are separated in four different categories now instead, with different amounts of points being awarded.

    Points awarded at the finish (by stage category)[1]

    cat. 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th
    a) & b)         50      40      34      28      25      22      20      18      16      14
    c)         25      22      20      18      16      14      12      10      8      6
    d) & e)         15      12      9      7      6      5      4      3      2      1

    + minor points for place 11-20 in category a) and b) and 11-15 in category c)

    Points awarded at the intermediate sprint (by stage category)

    cat. 1st  2nd 3rd  4th 5th  6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 
    a) & b)      20      16      12      9      7      6      4      3      2      1   
    c)      10      6      3      2      1                                                            
    d) & e)      8      4      1                                          

    ...with the stages being categorized in the following way:
    • categoria a) & b): 2a - 3a - 5a - 7a - 12a - 17a - 21a
    • categoria c): 4a - 6a - 8a - 10a - 11a - 13a - 18a
    • categoria d): 14a - 16a - 19a - 20a
    • categoria e): 1a - 9a - 15a (TTT & ITT)
    so with 7 possible sprint stages à 50 points on the line, compared to four mountain top finishes à 15 points (+intermediate stages which are usually won by various, and all types of riders), the rules clearly favor a sprinter to win the jersey. And contrary to some stages in past years, all of those handing out the maximum numbers of points are fairly straight forward sprint stages this time. The opportunities to eventually score big points mainly come pretty early in the race with four out of seven sprint stages in the first week. Therefor the battle for red is also likely to come down to motivation, because a sprinter who has scored many points in the first couple of days, will need to be able to fight through the mountain stages to reach the finish and defend his jersey.

    Favorites for the Maglia Rossa:



    The fastest sprinter in the race are Marcel Kittel and André Greipel, but with the Tour de France on their schedule later in the year, it's far from certain that they will even try to finish the race. The same may apply for Arnaud Démare.

    With the Italian sprinters it's a different story. Viviani surely has the speed to go for it, and he even tried to when the old points system favoring the gc riders was still in use, but at Sky he will have trouble to find the support he needs to be competitive. That's not the case for Modolo and last year's winner Giacomo Nizzolo, both of them will come with a lot of guys on their teams with the only job to give them a helping hand in the finale.

    The same applies for Caleb Ewan, but it remains to be seen if he is capable of finishing a Grand Tour already. Some certainly quick guys facing the same problem are Jakub Mareczko and Matteo Pelucchi, who probably will focus on stage wins instead.

    Outsiders could be sprinters like Nikias Arndt, José Joaquín Rojas and Sonny Colbrelli who can finish high the order in bunch sprint, but also be among the best on more selective stages.
     1. As the 2016 regulations are not available yet, all those information are from 2015
  • ReplyReply
  • « Last Edit: May 01, 2016, 20:08 by search »
    "If this is cycling, I am a banana"

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    Re: Giro d´Italia Big Preview
    « Reply #11 on: May 01, 2016, 19:35 »
    #blue Classifica scalatori

    Not only the jersey for the winner of the points classification has changed it's color in recent years, also the one for the King of the Mountains has - it turned from green to blue in 2012.

    It's quite a while ago the jersey was last won by the same rider who won the general classifcation - namely Marco Pantani in 1998 - and in recent years it has mostly been taken by riders not taking part in the fight for pink, like Giovanni Visconti last year, Julián Arredondo and Stefano Pirazzi in 2014 and 2013, or Matteo Rabottini, Stefano Garzelli and Matthew Lloyd in the years before. Although it must be said that Pirazzi benefitted from the cancellation of several mountains in the 2013 edition and Stefano Garzelli from the generosity of Alberto Contador, in those years it has been a very open fight for the jersey between the opportunists and gc contenders most of the time.

    But nonetheless the organizers decided to massively change the GPM points system for the 2014 edition of the giro, which resulted in a basically uncontested win for Julián Arredondo, more than 40 points clear of Dario Cataldo in 2nd place, and Nairo Quintana in 3rd, barely scoring half of Arredondo's points, despite being clearly the best climber in the race. But despite using the same points system, the same can not be said about the 2015 edition, when there was a battle between Visconti, Mikel Landa, Steven Kruijswijk and Beñat Intxausti basically until the final climb of the race, with each of them at times looking like the one to wear blue in Milano in the end.

    "The scores for the GPM ranking have been revised to bring out the qualities of the best climbers who compete in the Giro d'Italia. The scores have been changed by exponential increasing the scores of the hardest climbs categories to give them proportionally higher value."

    is what the organizers said when they changed the rules in 2014 - and it couldn't really have ended in a more diverse outcome in those past two years. So let's see how it turns out this time.

    Points are allocated in the following way:[1]

    CIMA COPPI GPM 1a Cat. GPM 2a Cat. GPM 3a Cat. GPM 4a Cat.
          40      32      14      7      3
          28      20      9      4      2
          21      14      6      2      1
          15      10      4      1      
          10      7      2            
          7      4      1            
          4      2               
          2      1               
          1                     

    (this year's Cima Coppi is the Colle dell'Agnello)

    So the allocation of points is very top-heavy, 1st category climbs are of much more importance than the smaller ones, and the big differences between the top finishers gives a massive advantage to those who manage to finish 1st on the big climbs.

    But in the end, the winner of the jersey it not only determined by the number of points awarded on the climbs, but also by the fact where those climbs are located during the stages:

    STAGE Pt. / Underway Pt. / at Finish
    Stage 1      Apeldoorn ITT            
    Stage 2      Arnhem - Nijmegen      3      
    Stage 3      Nijmegen - Arnhem      3      
    Stage 4      Catanzaro - Praia a Mare      7 + 7      
    Stage 5      Praia a Mare - Benevento      7      
    Stage 6      Ponte - Roccaraso      14      14
    Stage 7      Sulmano - Foligno      14 + 3      
    Stage 8      Foligno - Arezzo      7 + 14      
    Stage 9      Radda - Greve ITT            
    Stage 10      Campa Bisenzia - Sestola      7 + 7 + 32      7
    Stage 11      Modena - Asolo      3      
    Stage 12      Noale - Bibione            
    Stage 13      Palmanova - Cividale del Friuli      32 + 14 + 32 + 14      
    Stage 14      Farra d’Alpago - Corvara      32 + 14 + 7 + 14 + 32 + 14      
    Stage 15      Castelrotto - Alpe di Siusi ICTT            32
    Stage 16      Bressanone - Andalo      14 + 14      7
    Stage 17      Molveno - Cassano d’Adda      3      
    Stage 18      Muggiò - Pinerolo      14      
    Stage 19      Pinerolo - Risoul      40      32
    Stage 20      Guillestre - Sant’Anna di Vinadio      32 + 32 + 32      7
    Stage 21      Cuneo - Torino            
                      
    TOTAL            514      99

    As you can see, the total maximum number of points available during the stages clearly exceeds that at the stage finishes. Some of the mountain stages are suited to early attacks by the big favorites for the overall classification, but in the end this points system should nevertheless favor attackers to win the jersey this year. Compared to 2015, there are 86 points more available underway and 28 less at the stage finishes - and even back then, only one real gc rider was in the mix for the jersey.

    Favorites for the Maglia Azzuro:



    It's difficult to name clear favorites to win the Maglia Azzura as it always is determined by the outcome of the general classification as well, with riders casting an eye on the jersey only after losing time in gc - but generally it should favor riders who are never afraid to attack, like for example Stefano Pirazzi, Carlos Verona, Rein Taaramäe, Alessandro de Marchi and Tim Wellens. Darwin Atapuma has not quite come back to his best this season, so going for the overall classification might be too much to ask for, what could leave him with the mountain jersey as an objective for the Giro, same as Kanstantsin Sivtsov. Steven Kruijswijk nearly won the mountain jersey last year and will surely have another go - but it could also be someone completely different who takes it in the end - especially if the weather comes into play, and some stages turn out to be altered.
     1. As the 2016 regulations are not available yet, all those information are from 2015
  • ReplyReply
  • « Last Edit: May 01, 2016, 20:07 by search »

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    Re: Giro d´Italia Big Preview
    « Reply #12 on: May 01, 2016, 19:58 »
    #white Classifica giovani

    The white jersey for the best young rider was first introduced in 1976 and is awarded to the best rider not born before January 1st 1990. In the past years it was won by often won by Colombians, namely Rigoberto Uran, Carlos Betancur and Nairo Quintana, before Fabio Aru brought it back to Italy in 2015. The other winners since it's reintroduction in 2007 were Andy Schleck, Riccardo Riccò, Kevin Seeldraeyers, Richie Porte and Roman Kreuziger.

    With Carlos Betancur there's only one of those riders on the start list for this year's edition, and all recent winners - not born after Januar 1 1991 - are too old by now anyway, so we will definitely see a new winner again and Volodymyr Pulnikov and Pavel Tonkov will remain the only riders to have won the jersey twice.

    Favorites for the Maglia Bianca:



    Last year it was very easy to predict the winner for the white jersey, when Fabio Aru was still eligible as a rider who had already finished on the podium of the Giro before - this year it's a bit of a different story, with Sebastian Henao as the rider with the highest ranking so far - which is a 22nd place in 2014.

    Still, Formolo was looking much better than that for most of the Giro last year, and thereby should be the favorite to wear the jersey in Torino this time. Sebastian Henao was only 20 years old when he finished 22nd, so he may have the potential to give him a good fight, but it will depend on how much freedom he will get at Team Sky. Also Merhawi Kudus could eye a good position in the general classification as well and become a contender for the jersey thereby, while all other probably will have their eyes on other objectives, and would only step up if something completely unforeseen happens to the favorites.
  • ReplyReply
  • « Last Edit: May 03, 2016, 19:55 by search »

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    Re: Giro d´Italia Big Preview
    « Reply #13 on: May 01, 2016, 20:06 »
    Minor Classifications[1]

    There are a number of minor classifications in the Giro d'Italia, usually very few people take notice of, although in some cases the prize money is relatively high and especially the Italian teams seem to be interested to grab that chance to stand on the podium in Torino.

    TRAGUARDI VOLANTI «AUTOSTRADE PER L’ITALIA»

    A special Intermediate Sprints classification, with one intermediate sprint in each stage. 10-6-3-2-1 points are awarded for the five first riders crossing that point. The general classification is obtained by addition of the points collected by each rider throughout the whole race.


    PREMIO AZZURI D'ITALIA

    The "Azzurri d'Italia" Association offers a special prize for those who most consistently finish in the Top 3 on the stages of the Giro d'Italia. At each stage finish the winner will be granted with 4 points, the 2nd with 2 points and the 3rd with 1 point. The prize will be awarded to the rider who will gain the highest number of points at the end of the Giro.


    PREMIO "FUGA PINARELLO"

    A prize for the riders who spent the most km in a breakaway - in groups of up to 10 riders, and covering a distance of no less than five kilometres. The general classification shall be based on the sum of the breakaway kilometres totalized by each rider in the Giro d’Italia


    PREMIO DELLA COMBATTIVITA

    For this "Fighting Spirit" classification, points are awarded on all categorized climbs, at the intermediate sprints, and at the finish, in the following way:

    1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th
    Stage Finish      6      5      4      3      1
    Intermediate Sprint      5      4      3      2      -
    1st Cat. Climb & Cima Coppi      4      3      2      1      -
    2nd Cat. Climb      3      2      1      -      -
    3rd Cat. Climb      2      1      -      -      -
    4th Cat. Climb      1      -      -      -      -

    Every day the sum of the points obtained by each rider shall determine a classification, and the rider who obtains the best score shall be declared “FIGHTING SPIRIT OF THE STAGE”. At the end of the Giro the rider who will have accrued the maximum score will be declared as “SUPER FIGHTING SPIRIT”


    PREMIO "CLASSIFICA ENERGIA"

    This is a special prize for the fastest rider over the final 3km in the stages of the Giro d'Italia. At each stage finish the winner will be granted with 4 points, the 2nd with 2 points and the 3rd with 1 point. The prize will be awarded to the rider who will gain the highest number of points at the end of the Giro.


    CLASSIFICA SQUADRE A TEMPI

    This is the all important team classification, following the usual rules. The times of the three fastest riders per team are added up every stage.


    CLASSIFICA SQUADRE A PUNTI - SUPER TEAM

    Each stage, the first 20 finishers get points in the following order: 25, 20, 18, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, and the first five 8, 5, 3, 2, 1 at the intermediate sprints. The sum of those points for the riders belonging to the same team, will be added up to a daily and overall classification.


    PREMIO FAIR PLAY

    All violations set forth in the disciplinary rules are grouped in seven categories and penalties have been ascribed thereof. The violations – along with their relative points given to the team on a daily basis – are as follows:

    Violations Points
    Warnings      0.5
    Fines      1 per each CHF 10
    Time penalty      2 per each second
    Downgrading (rider)      100
    Downgrading (team car)      100
    DSQ from the race or exclusion from the finish order      1000
    Positive result in Antidoping Testing      2000

    Such penalties, imposed to riders, Sports Directors or other officially accredited members of the Team, as well as fines directly imposed to the Team shall be summed and will represent the score which will determine the general classification. The team which will have the lower score will be declared the winner of the "FAIR PLAY PRIZE”
     1. As the 2016 regulations are not available yet, all those information are from 2015
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    Giro d´Italia Big Preview
    « Reply #14 on: May 02, 2016, 10:37 »
    TV Coverage

    As usual, the host broadcaster for the Giro d'Italia will be the local RAI station. Italy’s national public broadcasting company has extended its commitment to the Giro d’Italia, deploying state-of-the-art technology to tell the story of the race from the heart of the action. RAI’s top team of journalists, commentators and technicians follow the race on-site. A broad spectrum of programming allows fans to switch on in the morning and stay with RAI channels until late. Full HD, in-race ultra slo-mo, team-car links, two moto-reporters and a detailed description of the towns, villages and landscapes of the Giro d’Italia. Four stages will be covered live from start to finish. Commentary by the inseparable Francesco Pancani and Silvio Martinello. Moto reporters: Andrea De Luca and Gianfranco Benincasa. Directed by Nazareno Balani, with Franco Bortuzzo coordinating journalistic content.

    COUNTRY CHANNEL COMMENTATORS
    *it Italy      RAI / Gazetta TV      Martinello & Pancani / Berton
    *gb Great Britain      Eurosport      Rob Hatch & Sean Kelly
    *usa USA      BeIN Sports      Carlton Kirby & Dan Lloyd
    *be Belgium      Sporza      Renaat Schotte & José de Cauwer
    *nl Netherlands      NOS / Eurosport      ? / Martijn Berkhout & Thijs Zonneveld
    *de Germany      Eurosport      Karsten Migels & Jean-Claude Leclercq
    *au Australia      Eurosport      Rob Hatch & Sean Kelly
    *se Sweden      Eurosport      Roberto Vacchi & Anders Adamson
    *dk Denmark      TV2 ZULU / Eurosport      Leth; Sørensen & Ritter / Wenzel & Kaae
    *fr France      BeIN Sports      Emmanuel Barth & Cédric Vasseur
    *ch Switzerland      RSI LA 1      Giancarlo Dionisio & Marco Vitali
    *es Spain      FORTA      various
    *qa Middle East      BeIN Sports      Carlton Kirby & Dan Lloyd
    *ca Canada      Sportsnet / RDS      Carlton Kirby & Dan Lloyd / L. Bertrand & D. Perras
    *mx Latin America      TDN / ESPN      various


    Coverage Times per Stage

    (the following times are from Eurosport's schedule and in CET)

    STAGE DATE TIME
    Stage: 1      6 May      Apeldoorn ITT      14:15 - 17:45
    Stage: 2      7 May      Arnhem - Nijmegen      14:15 - 17:45
    Stage: 3      8 May       Nijmegen - Arnhem      14:15 - 17:45
    Stage: 4       10 May      Catanzaro - Praia a Mare      14:15 - 17:45
    Stage: 5      11 May      Praia a Mare - Benevento      14:15 - 17:45
    Stage: 6      12 May      Ponte - Roccaraso      12:45 - 17:45
    Stage: 7      13 May      Sulmano - Foligno      14:15 - 17:45
    Stage: 8      14 May      Foligno - Arezzo      14:15 - 17:45
    Stage: 9      15 May      Radda - Greve ITT      14:15 - 17:45
    Stage: 10      17 May      Campa Bisenzia - Sestola      14:15 - 17:45
    Stage: 11      18 May      Modena - Asolo      14:15 - 17:45
    Stage: 12      19 May      Noale - Bibione      14:15 - 17:45
    Stage: 13      20 May      Palmanova - Cividale del Friuli      13:30 - 17:45
    Stage: 14      21 May      Farra d’Alpago - Corvara      12:45 - 17:45
    Stage: 15      22 May      Castelrotto - Alpe di Siusi ICTT      14:15 - 17:45
    Stage: 16      24 May      Bressanone - Andalo      14:15 - 17:45
    Stage: 17      25 May      Molveno - Cassano d’Adda      14:15 - 17:45
    Stage: 18      26 May      Muggiò - Pinerolo      14:15 - 17:45
    Stage: 19      27 May      Pinerolo - Risoul      14:15 - 17:45
    Stage: 20      28 May      Guillestre - Sant’Anna di Vinadio      14:15 - 17:45
    Stage: 21      29 May      Cuneo - Torino      14:15 - 17:45
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