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Re: Athletics
« Reply #180 on: December 04, 2014, 07:15 »
Well, that only took about 2 hours ... :o

Here's my transcript of the documentary. Not edited in any way, just what I jotted down while watching it. Direct quotes are mostly paraphrased and subject to correction, but recite what's said in the German soundtrack.


Vitaly Stepanov (ex-RUSADA employee): All Russian athletes dope. Results not possible without doping. Coaches and officials clearly say "you can only get so far with your natural abilities". To win medals, you need help - doping.

Coaches are told again and again "they have to dope", coaches then tell it to the athletes again and again. Athletes don't even think they're doing anything wrong.

EPO from pharmacy, brought by courier, no prescription necessary

Bribery of anti-doping officials; training camps under false names; 'pre-produced' clean urine samples

RUSADA: 23110 tests, 2.2% positive (>500 cases)

Sound files (talks between coaches & athletes): "EPO?" "Peptide hormones"; "forbidden substances?" "don't call it that, it's 'special preparation'"; Melnikov (athletics coach): "we don't need high hemoglobin, so we don't need EPO, especially not the amounts used earlier"

Coaches tell athletes "use this and that" - if caught, they're discarded and someone else is given the same treatment

Evgenia Pecherina (discus throw): "99% of Russian athletes dope. You can get whatever you want. The shorter it's detectable, the higher the price"

Anonymous coach: "Internal system. If you want to get better results, you call a phone number, introduce yourself, and you'll get what you want. But you only get the phone number after a background check - if the high authorities don't approve of you, you won't get it."

Oleg Popov (coach throw disciplines): "Athletes have no choice. Stay in the system, win medals that count for the federation, the coach, the sports ministry etc. - or you'll be thrown out very quickly."

Sergey Portugalov: Building anti-doping task force in Russia with support from IAAF; YouTube video from seminar on medicine & supplements; adviser to several international sports organisations; central figure in Russian Olympics preparation (already since Soviet era in 70s & 80s); advises athletes on doping practices (by mail), hands out substances and performs injections himself

Price for Portugalov's help: 50.000 for gold medal, 30.000 for silver, 20.000 for bronze (not clear which currency, I presume rubles); plus 5% of all prize money earned in a season, plus price for substances

Hidden camera video of meeting with Portugalov & Melnikov; no comments from those two

Other sports waiting at Portugalov's office: cross country skiing, race walking, 400 m, swimming

TV crew not welcome at Russian Olympic Committee; mailed questions never answered by Russian athletics fed

When athlete is tested, they get a form with the ID number of their sample - they send it to Portugalov by text message, and he'll arrange everything

Ministry officials called RUSADA, asking for identity of positive athlete. If he/she was unknown, it's positive. If it's a celebrity or a young medal hopeful, it was a "mistake".

RUSADA officials made sure that certain athletes didn't even get tested: Swimming, cycling, biathlon, athletics, weight-lifting, nordic skiing

Nikita Kamaev (RUSADA director) denies allegations. "All sportsmen that make allegations have been tested positive themselves. These people then turn to journalists and tell stories. Those stories are simply ridiculous for professionals. RUSADA always worked correctly."

RUSADA calls in Yuliya Stepanova for test (that she has to pay for herself).

Talk between Vitaly Stepanov & sports ministry official: "Ministry doesn't like that WADA wants to control RUSADA"

Government decree that says that test samples have to be declared before being exported (to foreign labs), may even be opened at border controls (signed by then prime minister Putin)

Valentin Kruglyakov (400 m): Pre-competition tests before big events, making sure all athletes are 'clean'. Those who don't pass controls simply don't start - that doesn't mean they're also banned, though.

RUSADA report 2012: "Every of the 500 Olympics starters tested at least once pre-Games"[1]

Video with Mariya Savinova (2012 gold medal on 800 m): "Well, this is how it works in Russia. We have to use pharma. My coach works with Melnikov and helps to sweep the tests under the carpet. They switch dates for/of tests. And oxandrolone is gone from my system very quickly, less than 20 days. We tested that, my husband has good connections to the anti-doping lab."

Olivier Rabin (WADA scientific director): "We've had 'miscommunications' in reporting of test results. Test that we knew were positive weren't reported as such. Corruption, or as I call it, influencing of reporting of test results. Corruption or something difference."[2]

Rodchenkov is director of anti-doping lab in Moscow. Stepanov says he does the same as Portugalov: "Sells doping to athletes, prepares doping plans, watches out for 'his' athletes and makes positives go away. Of course he does it for money." Popov: "Especially with the very top athletes, samples were exchanged with others." Pecherina: "Rodchenkov is informed about everything. He knows about half-life times, he's the absolute specialist."

Rodchenkov: "Be careful about believing fraudsters. A positive test was the disaster of their life." Denies he's taken money to cover up positives: "There are rumours, yes, but they're not true."

Rodchenkov was suspected of doping trafficking 3 years ago - allegations not investigated by Russian government

President of Russian federation, Balakhnichev, cornered in hotel: "I'm not involved in doping. I'll never talk about it. You have your opinion, I have mine: I'm not involved. I'm the president and never involved in anything. I reject your questions. I'm not involved [in the doping problem], your questions are strange."

Suspicious bio-passport from marathon runner. Mario Thevis (Köln lab): "Outside of references, ban would be justified." Anonymous informer from IAAF periphery: "Bribery in IAAF to cover up positives." Confirms that bio-passport data are from Liliya Shobukhova.

IAAF states: "Bio-passport processes take longer. But also delay from Russians." Shobukhova: "2011 Russian athletic fed said there were problems, 2012 Olympics participation in doubt. We had to pay 150.000 € to solve the problems, then I could participate." Money withdrawn in cash in January 2012, meeting in Moscow, money handed over, told "it will all be fine", next day she went to training camp in Portugal. IAAF reported bio-passport irregularities to Russian fed in June 2012, and now they're seen as anti-doping violation. Shortly after Melnikov contacts Shobukhova, asks for 300.000 € (again paid in cash). Abandons Olympic marathon in August due to injury. Not listed in IAAF testing protocol once in 2012. IAAF: "Tested once in competition."

2013: Some people were still pushing for a ban. Melnikov calls Shobukhova & husband to Moscow for meeting, asks them to sign paper about doping suspension. They deny to sign, ask "what did we pay all the money for?" Balakhnichev got nervous, ordered the money to be paid back. No comment on that from Balakhnichev.

Shobukhov shows bank receipt for transaction of 300.000 € from Black Tidings, company registered in Singapore, phantom company in residential area. Company was divested shortly after payment to Shobukhov.

Mail communication regarding bank transaction between Melnikov & Shobukhovs - a forward from Balakhnichev. Bank receipt attached.

Confirmation of transaction in internal IAAF document; investigation into bribery performed by Shobukhova. Balakhnichev is IAAF treasurer.

Anonymous IAAF informer tells of death threats.

Kruglyakov: "Someone's currently serving a 2-year ban and tried to take action against his ban. He was told not to do that, or he might get involved in a car crash."

Anonymous coach: "It's dangerous to talk. Some have tried to commit suicide[3]. In one case the help came too late."

Wada founding president Dick Pound & WADA general director David Howman are confronted with evidence.
Pound: "You've put together a comprehensive and very alarming case. Now that it's public, somebody has to come up with an answer. If things of this magnitude are organised in a country, it's a serious problem for the credibility of sports and of anti-doping efforts. It's pretty dreadful to see it goes all the way up to the IAAF, that's equally serious."
Howman: "The combination of it all is shocking. Details are disappointing. Combining everything and looking at the facts, it's certainly shocking. Now we have to approach this fearlessly, but also make sure to protect the people suffering from fear."

August 2014: Russian TV reports about anti-doping meeting with sports minister. 6 coaches banned for doping practices - the names are kept secret though.

Kyrgyzstan, training camp, short time ago: Stepanova is training, ban ends in January. Meeting with Kazarin (coach of Savinova): "We can work with oxandrolone and primobolan, also with EPO to start with. But we have to be careful that you stay within the limits in case of a control. Here you have the pills." (taking pills & vials from a drawer in the hotel room and throwing them on the bed) "What's that?" "Oxandrolone."

Pills analysed in Köln, clearly contain oxandrolone (anabolic steroid).

Question asked at end: Only happening in Russia? Tip that it would be worthwhile to look at other countries, too.

Stepanovs say they'll be public enemies no. 1 in Russia. Get letter from WADA saying they did a big contribution to anti-doping fight. Have left Russia with their 8-month old son a few days ago - forever.
 1. You'd bloody well hope so! OOC testing is the way forward we're always told...
 2. Call a spade a spade, Olivier! Corruption doesn't have to be cash ...
 3. yeah, right. 'Suicide'

Thankls Fus great stuff, a lot more info than a few 140 charater tweets can do

No real media yet  :(
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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #181 on: December 04, 2014, 07:40 »
    the Guardian picked it up yesterday evening

    http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2014/dec/03/russia-accused-athletics-doping-cover-up-olympics

    or what do you mean exactly?
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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #182 on: December 04, 2014, 07:41 »
    the Guardian picked it up yesterday evening

    http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2014/dec/03/russia-accused-athletics-doping-cover-up-olympics

    or what do you mean exactly?

    was hoping to see it everywhere are worls wide media Blitz
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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #183 on: December 04, 2014, 08:06 »
     Unfortunately, it will be the one version, retold in most cases.
    The Telegraph has it:
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/othersports/athletics/11272052/Russias-London-2012-800m-champion-caught-in-doping-storm.html
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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #187 on: December 04, 2014, 14:40 »
    https://twitter.com/Scienceofsport/status/540464768600264704



    Very quick thoughts from me regarding this Russian (& IAAF) doping cover-up and bribery scandal:
    1) I'd offer it as further proof that as much as we need to keep working at improving the science of anti-doping, testing more often, testing with greater sensitivity, the REAL PROBLEM is not the science, but the implementation of its tools by authorities.
    When a national federation is covering up multiple positive tests, in return for bribes in some instances (it's not like usually they need that added incentive in the current climate anyway), then it doesn't matter if anti-doping tests are more reliable that DNA analysis for crime investigations, they're all relegated to amateur hack jobs anyway.
    The science is by no means perfect, but it is rarely the cause of the failure in this current system.
    2) For all the talk of banning athletes for life (which I'd agree with if the system - both legal and scientific - could back up the initial positive tests without crippling financial debt), the talk should be more about how this kind of deep corruption should be punished. If the national federations have an incentive to cover up doping, and support cheating by athletes (and Russia is not the first, nor the only one to be doing this, I am certain), then athletes should not face the full force of the legal hammer. The same goes, incidentally, for the doping enablers, which I know WADA has rightly targeted, but this is a level beyond that.
    WADA's primary target should be the federations, and possibly even the sports. If officials from the IAAF are revealed to have accepted bribes and to have partnered with Russian anti-doping authorities to protect "big names", then they too should be punished.
    Legally, I'm guessing there is too much standing between them and a global ban from sport for Russia for four years, but that's the kind of disincentive that might just trickle down to the athletes. Even more than this, imagine the IAAF as a collective sport faced a ban because it's officials are complicit? No Usain Bolt, no Mo Farah, no Valerie Adams. Of course, that's exactly the reason why it can't happen, but we seem to find ourselves in a situation where the disincentive to dope is meaninglessly small, as long as those in power continue to enable doping.
    Because to repeat, what's the threat of a life-ban if your own country has your back? Toothless tigers...
    Ross
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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #190 on: December 05, 2014, 15:59 »
    Russians going after the tv station etc in courts it seems or talking about it

    https://twitter.com/heywoodu/status/540876284256337921
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    Re: Darkside - General news
    « Reply #191 on: December 06, 2014, 01:34 »
    Here is the full script, in English, of the recent documentary on Russian doping that appeared on ARD

    https://www.scribd.com/doc/249307975/English-Script
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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #192 on: December 06, 2014, 07:00 »
    http://www.theage.com.au/sport/athletics/russia-is-athletics-lance-armstrong-case-20141205-121jc8.html

    why the hell this is Lance Moment, This is way bigger than that Tool :lol

    Yet, in a telephone interview, there is barely a note of surprise in Hak's soft and even voice. Athletes long harboured misgivings about "shady" Russian competitors and their "really closed world".

    "We all knew it," she said. "All athletes talked about it."

    If even half of what ARD alleged is true, then this is a Lance Armstrong moment, potentially make-or-break, for Russian sport and for the wider world's anti-doping system built up over 15 years to try to keep it clean and credible.

    bits cut

    For Hak, it's too late.

    Even if investigators confirm it is Savinova talking in the ARD report about steroid use, Hak knows that cannot change their race in 2010. The photo Hak posted on Twitter this week will always show her finishing second behind the Russian, not winning gold.

    "It's about the moment, of course, and they took that way from me," she said. "I cannot get it back."
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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #193 on: December 06, 2014, 12:23 »
    Le Monde considers the history of State involvement in doping in Russia:

    Quote
    The end of the Soviet Union left athletes and trainers to fend for themselves without resources, as several press stories confirmed at the time. The most significant of these was the arrest in late 1992 by Swedish customs authorities of four Russian athletes, two of whom were world champions, and their coach for possession of a bag containing anabolic steroids. It seems that not only the consumption but the supply and traffic of substances had become a source of revenue for the former Soviets, who were now free to earn their own living on the athletics circuit.

    In a chapter of the book Doping in Elite Sport (2001), Bruce Kidd and his academic co-authors consider that between 1992 and 1996, there was no anti-doping policy in a Russia weakened by political instability and at the same time keen to show itself as supportive of sanctions against cheats, especially athletes and weightlifters: "In the years that followed the demise of the bloc, the leaders of Russian sports did little to defend athletes who tested positive."

    ...

    The renaissance of Russian athletics which began in the second half of the 90s chimes in with a new political direction, according to Kidd: "After 1996, these same officials, who were sensitive to political pressure and required to keep up the level of performance under impoverished conditions, were forced to confront conflicting nationalistic sentiments."

    ...

    [The eventual result of four Bromantane positives for Russian athletes at the 1996 Olympic Games] was a loss of face which still aggrieves the nation. Since Atlanta, there has been an obvious trend towards systematic appeals for every positive test and loud expressions of indignation.

    As a result of [this week's] ARD documentry, the Minister for Sports Vitaly Mutko issued a press release denouncing those for whom the objective is "to undermine Russian sport". Is Russian athletics now about to suffer sanctions from the IAAF against the backdrop of several scandals from the last two Olympic Games? The national rowing team, guilty in 2008 of nine separate anti-doping violations in a single year and threatened with exclusion from the Games, dodged the bullet by handing out three-year suspensions to management.

    But by whom were they replaced? Perhaps by former Soviet managers with profiles similar to that of Valentin Balakhnichev, former 100m hurdler and member of the Soviet team from 1971 to 1974, trainer of the national team from 1978 until 1984, presider of the Russian athletics federation since 1991 and finally treasurer of the IAAF, an individual against whom there are now suspicions of corruption. The IAAF has announced that its Ethics Commission has accepted the dossier. In order to assess the current state of Russian sport, will the treasurer be asked to open the archives of the USSR?

    http://vazel.blog.lemonde.fr/2014/12/05/dopage-lathletisme-russe-face-a-son-passe/ (FR)
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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #194 on: December 06, 2014, 12:41 »
    Nice find laz, all a very similar story, as 1 we have heard before , but 1 many have wanted public for years
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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #197 on: December 09, 2014, 13:44 »
    The Telegraph says it has the name, so it might indeed be a "star" - but that article is totally misleading. No British star is mentioned in that feature, and that quote is not about her, but about anonymously shown values.

    the only link to *gb in that whole feature at all is this picture:



    so that "star" is female.
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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #198 on: December 09, 2014, 14:53 »
    Review of part 3 from Hajo

    Quote
    According to a long time member of the IAAF Medical Commission the assumed no-follow-up (or cover up?) of Doping has been happening much longer than we thought. The IAAF Anti Doping Department did apparently not follow up on highly suspicious blood values from at least 150 athletes from around the world (Russia, Spain, Morocco, Kenya, Germany, United Kingdom and many more countries) at a a time where the only chance to catch them was target testing: 2006 to 2008. The vast majority of these cases would still be sanctionable by the Anti Doping rules if they had done a Target testing.

    The witness tells us, that - although the IAAF Anti Doping Department has been aware of highly suspicious blood values from athletes - they obviously did not try to do a testing on these people. According to the long Time IAAF Medical expert. His quotes are part of the programme
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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #199 on: December 09, 2014, 15:48 »
    IAAF response

    Quote
    In response to further allegations made last night (8) in the WRD TV programme Inside Sport concerning the integrity of Athletics' anti-doping programme with respect to the haemoglobin values of a number of athletes in the period 2006-2009, the IAAF would like to point out the following:
    1. The Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) was launched by the IAAF only in 2009, when WADA set out a harmonised regulatory framework allowing the use of reliable and comparable values. That was not the case before 2009 (different sample collections conditions, transportations and analytical equipment.).
    2. The blood data collected before 2009 were used for target purposes to "trigger" follow-up urine tests for EPO detection. This was the practice by the few International Federations which were conducting blood tests back then (UCI, FIS). Abnormal results were duly followed-up by the IAAF, whenever possible logistically.
    3. One cannot draw any conclusion on whether or not an athlete has doped on the basis of one single blood value. The whole concept of the ABP is to monitor the variations of an athlete's profile consisting of multiple values.
    4. A member of the IAAF Medical and Anti-Doping Commission would not know whether follow-up tests would have been conducted or not.
    5. When they are available, the IAAF has used the blood values prior to 2009 as "secondary evidence", in support of an increased sanction in addition to the post-2009 profile to establish the athlete's long history of doping. However these values do not have the same level of reliability and strength as the post-2009 values which were collected under strict and stringent conditions.
    6. Finally, the IAAF has been using the pre-2009 blood data to conduct a prevalence study which was subsequently published (in 2011). It allowed the IAAF to identify the countries were there was a high-risk of doping and to adjust its doping control programme accordingly.
    A copy of video and English transcript of the WRD documentary will be sent directly to independent IAAF Ethics Commission who are already investigating this matter. Any information that shows a breach of our anti-doping rules will be added to the separate investigation that has been opened following part 1 of the ARD documentary.
    ---
    The IAAF is also aware of a story published in The Guardian online today (9 December 2014) in which a number of serious allegations have been made regarding Papa Massata Diack. Although Mr Diack has reserved the right to respond as a private individual, since Mr Diack is a consultant for marketing matters for IAAF we would, nonetheless, like to clarify a number of points.
    The allegations in the newspaper relate to the bid in 2011 by Doha, Qatar, to host the IAAF World Championships 2017.  On 11 November 2011, Doha lost that bid process to London by a vote of the IAAF Council. The vote was 10 to 16.
    The Guardian makes reference to emails and documents which the IAAF has not seen, and these documents and any complaints should be sent to the independent IAAF Ethics Commission which has full powers to investigate and issue sanctions if necessary.
    The IAAF firmly believes that the Ethics Commission is the correct platform for any complaints and urges any members of the athletics family to contact this body directly.
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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #200 on: December 10, 2014, 16:02 »
    https://www.scribd.com/doc/249751954/Sport-Inside-Englisch

    English translation of part 3 of ARD's Russian report
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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #201 on: December 10, 2014, 21:21 »
    looks like I was wrong about only 1 athlete from *gb, there must have been more on other lists



    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/othersports/athletics/11285757/Athletics-doping-scandal-where-the-suspected-athletes-come-from.html

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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #204 on: December 12, 2014, 16:22 »


    Here is the ARD report with English subtitles
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  • Joelsim

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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #205 on: December 12, 2014, 20:07 »
    Just watched all 4 parts. Unfortunately that is what the anti-dopers are up against.
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  • Race Radio

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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #206 on: December 14, 2014, 21:08 »
    The British star is the one that many had hoped. Not going to name names but she has been very outspoken against EPO. She has a very interesting excuse. She was pregnant......which is odd as normally pregnancy lowers Hct.

    Some of the numbers on the list are insane. Off scores for a man of 167, a woman of 170. That is freaking insane.
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #207 on: December 14, 2014, 22:46 »
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  • froome19

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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #208 on: December 15, 2014, 14:42 »
    Paula Radcliffe calls for life bans for athletes guilty of doping

    Quote
    Paula Radcliffe has called for life bans for any athlete found guilty of doping, amid allegations that the practice is widespread in Russian sport.

    Last week a Germany television documentary presented what it claimed was evidence of widespread drugs use while also alleging that corruption extends beyond Russia and implicated the International Association of Athletics Federations in covering up the abuse.

    The Russian Athletics Federation says the allegations are untrue while the IAAF’s independent ethics commission is already investigating the allegations and the World Anti-Doping Agency has revealed it will follow suit.

    Radcliffe, the women’s marathon world record holder, described the allegations as “shocking and sickening” and, despite Wada saying that life bans for athletes convicted of doping offences are unenforceable in law, she believes that any athlete guilty of the offence should not be allowed to return to the sport.

    Hmmmm....
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    Joelsim

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    Re: Athletics
    « Reply #209 on: December 15, 2014, 14:47 »
    Radcliffe has always been very outspoken against doping, one of the only ones a la Wiggo.
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