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Le Tour The Big preview
« on: June 27, 2016, 10:26 »

Running from Saturday July 2nd to Sunday July 24th 2016, the 103th Tour de France will be made up of 21 stages and will cover a total distance of 3,519 kilometres.

The route

Running from Saturday July 2nd to Sunday July 24th 2016, the 103th Tour de France will be made up of 21 stages and will cover a total distance of 3,519 kilometres.

9 flat stages
1 hilly stage
9 mountain stages including 4 summit finishes (Andorre Arcalis, Mont Ventoux, Finhaut-Emosson et Saint-Gervais Mont Blanc)
2 individual time trial stages
2 rest days

Distinctive aspects of the race

BORDERS
The 103rd Tour de France will visit three neighboring countries: Spain, the Principality of Andorra and Switzerland.

TIME-TRIALS
Individual time-trials return in style to the 2016 Tour de France with a total of 54 kilometres divided into two sequences: 37 between Bourg-Saint-Andéol (stage 13) and La Caverne du Pont-d’Arc and 17 between Sallanches and Megève (stage 18).

BONUSES
Back in 2015 after a seven-year absence, time bonuses will again be given at the fi nishes of normal stages. The bonuses will be of 10, 6 and 4 seconds for the fi rst three of each stage.

POINTS
The green jersey will be rewarded to the leader of the points classifi cation. Points will be given at the fi nishes of each stage as well as at an intermediate sprint on every normal stage.
The polka dot jersey will be worn by the leader of best climbers classifi cation. Points will be given out at the top of mountains and hills and at the 4 mountain-top fi nishes (Andorre Arcalis, Mont Ventoux, Finhaut-Emosson and Saint-Gervais Mont Blanc).

16 unseen sites and stage cities

Utah Beach Sainte-Marie-du-Mont (finish of stage 1)
Saint-Lô (start of stage 2)
Arpajon-sur-Cère (start of stage)
L’Isle-Jourdain (start of stage 7)
Lac de Payolle (finish of stage 7)
Vielha Val d’Aran (start of stage 9)
Escaldes-Engordany (start of stage 10)
Bourg-Saint-Andéol (start of stage 13)
La Caverne du Pont-d’Arc (finish of stage 13)
Villars-les-Dombes Parc des Oiseaux (finish of stage 14)
Culoz (finish of stage 15)
Moirans-en-Montagne (start of stage 16)
Berne (finish of stage 16 and start of stage 17)
Finhaut-Emosson (finish of stage 17)
Megève (finish of stage 18 and start of stage 20)
Chantilly (start of stage 21)

STAGE TYPE DATE START & FINISH DISTANCE DETAILS
 
1   #flat   Saturday July 2nd   Mont-Saint-Michel / Utah Beach Sainte-Marie-du-Mont   188 km   
2   #flat   Sunday July 3rd   Saint-Lô / Cherbourg-en-Cotentin   183 km   
3   #flat   Monday July 4th   Granville / Angers   223.5 km   
4   #flat   Tuesday July 5th   Saumur / Limoges   237.5 km   
5   #mountain    Wednesday July 6th   Limoges / Le Lioran   216 km   
6   #flat   Thursday July 7th   Arpajon-sur-Cère / Montauban   190.5 km   
7   #mountain   Friday July 8th   L'Isle-Jourdain / Lac de Payolle   162.5 km   
8   #mountain   Saturday July 9th   Pau / Bagnères-de-Luchon   184 km   
9   #mountain   Sunday July 10th   Vielha Val d'Aran / Andorre Arcalis   184 km   
rest day   :zzz2   Monday July 11th   Andorre / Andorre       
10   #med   Tuesday July 12th   Escaldes-Engordany / Revel197 km   
11   #flat   Wednesday July 13th   Carcassonne / Montpellier   162.5 km   
12   #mountain   Thursday July 14th   Montpellier / Mont Ventoux   185 km   
13   #tt   Friday July 15th   Bourg-Saint-Andéol / La Caverne du Pont-d'Arc   37.5 km   
14   #flat   Saturday July 16th   Montélimar / Villars-les-Dombes Parc des Oiseaux   208.5 km   
15   #mountain   Sunday July 17th   Bourg-en-Bresse / Culoz   159 km   
16   #flat   Monday July 18th   Moirans-en-Montagne / Berne   209 km   
Rest Day   :zzz2   Tuesday July 19th   Berne / Berne      
17   #mountain   Wednesday July 20th   Berne / Finhaut-Emosson   184 km   
18   #tt   Thursday July 21st   Sallanches / Megève   17 km   
19   #mountain   Friday July 22nd   Albertville / Saint-Gervais Mont Blanc   146 km   
20   #mountain   Saturday July 23rd   Megève / Morzine-Avoriaz   146.5 km   
21   #flat   Sunday July 24th   Chantilly / Paris Champs-Élysées   113 km


info source and Race :web :twitter
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    Larri Nov 12, 2014

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    Re: Le Tour The Big preview
    « Reply #1 on: June 27, 2016, 10:26 »
    STAGE TYPE DATE START & FINISH DISTANCE DETAILS
     
    1   #flat   Saturday July 2nd   Mont-Saint-Michel / Utah Beach Sainte-Marie-du-Mont   188 km   
    2   #flat   Sunday July 3rd   Saint-Lô / Cherbourg-en-Cotentin   183 km   
    3   #flat   Monday July 4th   Granville / Angers   223.5 km   
    4   #flat   Tuesday July 5th   Saumur / Limoges   237.5 km   
    5   #mountain    Wednesday July 6th   Limoges / Le Lioran   216 km   
    6   #flat   Thursday July 7th   Arpajon-sur-Cère / Montauban   190.5 km   
    7   #mountain   Friday July 8th   L'Isle-Jourdain / Lac de Payolle   162.5 km   
    8   #mountain   Saturday July 9th   Pau / Bagnères-de-Luchon   184 km   
    9   #mountain   Sunday July 10th   Vielha Val d'Aran / Andorre Arcalis   184 km   
    rest day   :zzz2   Monday July 11th   Andorre / Andorre

     
    Stage 1,   #flat,   Saturday July 2nd,   Mont-Saint-Michel / Utah Beach Sainte-Marie-du-Mont,   188 km

    The Mont-Saint-Michel! Who could have dreamt of a more spectacular Grand Départ to a Tour de France under the sign of esthetics? From there, it'll be a rather smooth start: fl at terrain on all the stage. At the fi nish, the riders will have a meeting with history, arriving at Utah Beach, one of the beaches chosen on the 6th of June 1944 for the D-Day Landing operations. The sprinters should have the final word…





    Km 20.5 - Côte d'Avranches1.2 kilometre-long climb at 5.7% - category 4
    Km 39.0 - Côte des falaises de Champeaux1.3 kilometre-long climb at 4.8% - category 4





    Sprint stage with KOM jersey up for grabs should be a hectic start


    Stage 2,   #flat,   Sunday July 3rd,   Saint-Lô / Cherbourg-en-Cotentin,   183 km

    n the menu from Saint-Lô, the chef-lieu of the Manche area and a journey through the west coast all the way to Cherbourg-en-Cotentin. That's where the race will get harder with a fi rst ever fi nish at the summit of the Côte de La Glacerie. A 3-km climb with a passage at 14%, therefore meaning seconds to be gained for the stage contenders and the favorites of the Tour.





    Km 10.0 - Côte de Torigny-les-Villes1.4 kilometre-long climb at 5.7% - category 4
    Km 23.0 - Côte de Montabot (D28-D98)1.9 kilometre-long climb at 5% - category 4
    Km 52.0 - Côte de Montpinchon1.2 kilometre-long climb at 5.9% - category 4
    Km 181.5 - Côte de La Glacerie1.9 kilometre-long climb at 6.5% - category 3







    Take too quick a look at the stage and you would think lumpy but a up hill sprint finish, but today will make the 1st of the GC battles.  Côte de La Glacerie will cause splits and the headlines will read rider x lost y seconds but looking forward the tour is long


    3,   #flat,   Monday July 4th,   Granville / Angers,   223.5 km
    There will be revenges to be taken for the beaten riders of the first days and hard work for their teams to make sure that after 220 km, the peloton makes it bunched to the finish for a well organised sprint by the City Hall. For the finishers, winning after the likes of Freddy Maertens, Jan Raas or Tom Boonen deserves quite some efforts.





    Km 25.5 - Côte de Villedieu-les-Poêles1.5 kilometre-long climb at 4.4% - category 4





    4,   #flat,   Tuesday July 5th,   Saumur / Limoges,   237.5 km

    he stroke of a pen on the map of France says it all: 232 kilometres. It'll be the longest stage and it should have an effect on the legs in the closing moments. The beautiful flat roads going through the Haute-Vienne area should favour the sprinters. Just as much as the final slightly uphill straight ending the stage in front of the City hall.





    Km 182.0 - Côte de la Maison Neuve (D25-D7)1.2 kilometre-long climb at 5.6% - category 4





    Quiet lumpy and and uphill drag expect riders like Sagan, Kristoff, Degenkolb Matthews and GVA to battle out for the stage

    Stage 5,   #mountain,    Wednesday July 6th,   Limoges / Le Lioran,   216 km

    Before the serious business starts, the climbers will be able to seek inspiration in the conquering spirit of Raymond Poulidor while going through Saint-Léonard-de-Noblat. They will then have to show themselves in the series of climbs on the menu with the Pas de Peyrol and the Col du Perthus, followed by the climb heading to Le Lioran.
    A battle between downhillers is to be expected in the final moments.






    Km 16.5 - Côte de Saint-Léonard-de-Noblat1.7 kilometre-long climb at 5.2% - category 4
    Km 142.5 - Côte du Puy Saint-Mary6.8 kilometre-long climb at 3.9% - category 3
    Km 173.5 - Col de Neronne7.1 kilometre-long climb at 3% - category 3
    Km 185.0 - Pas de Peyrol (Puy Mary) (1 589 m) (D680-D17)5.4 kilometre-long climb at 8.1% - category 2
    Km 201.5 - Col du Perthus (1 309 m)4.4 kilometre-long climb at 7.9% - category 2
    Km 213.5 - Col de Font de Cère3.3 kilometre-long climb at 5.8% - category 3







    Will we see the 1st of the Double stage days, Breakaway fighting for the win and a GC battle. Bardet, Nibali, Contador might look to take a run at a downhill attack Pas de Peyrol might lend itself to this, Cummings will have this stage penciled in red

    stage 6,   #flat,   Thursday July 7th,   Arpajon-sur-Cère / Montauban,   190.5 km

    While leaving the areas of Cantal and Aveyron, the numerous painful hills should give a few options to breakaway candidates. But the horizon should then be far clearer for the sprinters who will find in Montauban a perfect terrain for an exciting explanation.





    Km 62.0 - Col des Estaques2 kilometre-long climb at 6% - category 3
    Km 71.5 - Côte d'Aubin1.3 kilometre-long climb at 5.4% - category 4
    Km 149.0 - Côte de Saint-Antonin-Noble-Val3.2 kilometre-long climb at 5.1% - category 3





    One for the Break

    Stage 7,   #mountain,   Friday July 8th,   L'Isle-Jourdain / Lac de Payolle,   162.5 km

    As the Tour enters the Pyrenees, the pace should increase and the race enter a new dimension. The climb to the Col d'Aspin will be the only theater of battle on the day… in terms of climbing! But the descent, as splendid as it is technical, heading to the Lac de Payolle will also be a decisive exercise.   





    Km 117.0 - Côte de Capvern7.7 kilometre-long climb at 3.1% - category 4
    Km 155.5 - Col d'Aspin (1 490 m)12 kilometre-long climb at 6.5% - category 1







    Stage 8,   #mountain,   Saturday July 9th,   Pau / Bagnères-de-Luchon,   184 km   

    The great classic of the Pyrenees has been reconsidered for this 2016 edition of the Tour. After the Col du Tourmalet, the race will, for the first time, head up the Hourquette d'Ancizan from a different side before taking on the Col de Val-Louron-Azet and Peyresourde!
    A battle with several levels where anything and everything can happen






    Km 86.0 - Col du Tourmalet (2 115 m) Souvenir Jacques Goddet19 kilometre-long climb at 7.4% - category H
    Km 120.0 - Hourquette d'Ancizan (1 564 m)8.2 kilometre-long climb at 4.9% - category 2
    Km 148.0 - Col de Val Louron-Azet (1 580 m)10.7 kilometre-long climb at 6.8% - category 1
    Km 168.5 - Col de Peyresourde (1 569 m)7.1 kilometre-long climb at 7.8% - category 1











    A massive saw blade of a stage, look for the sky train to out in force, weather will be the key here, someone GC will be over at the end of today, Akey stage of the Tour


    Stage 9,   #mountain,   Sunday July 10th,   Vielha Val d'Aran / Andorre Arcalis,   184 km

    The five climbs of the day are scattered between the Spanish and Andorran territories. In the final 50 kilometres, one will have to cope with the explosive climb to the Col de la Comella, then the rather irregular one to Beixalis that left rather bad memories to Christopher Froome on the last Vuelta, and finally the long climb to Arcalis.   





    Km 19.0 - Port de la Bonaigua (2 072 m)13.7 kilometre-long climb at 6.1% - category 1
    Km 87.5 - Port del Cantò (1 721 m)19 kilometre-long climb at 5.4% - category 1
    Km 143.0 - Côte de la Comella (1 347 m)4.2 kilometre-long climb at 8.2% - category 2
    Km 157.0 - Col de Beixalis (1 796 m) (CS210-CS310)6.4 kilometre-long climb at 8.5% - category 1
    Km 184.5 - ANDORRE ARCALIS (2 240m)10.1 kilometre-long climb at 7.2% - category H





    Long day of climbing today, dependent on the break could be another stage of the break


    rest day,   :zzz2,   Monday July 11th,   Andorre / Andorre


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    Re: Le Tour The Big preview
    « Reply #2 on: June 27, 2016, 10:27 »
    STAGE TYPE DATE START & FINISH DISTANCE DETAILS
            
    10   #med   Tuesday July 12th   Escaldes-Engordany / Revel197 km   
    11   #flat   Wednesday July 13th   Carcassonne / Montpellier   162.5 km   
    12   #mountain   Thursday July 14th   Montpellier / Mont Ventoux   185 km   
    13   #tt   Friday July 15th   Bourg-Saint-Andéol / La Caverne du Pont-d'Arc   37.5 km   
    14   #flat   Saturday July 16th   Montélimar / Villars-les-Dombes Parc des Oiseaux   208.5 km   
    15   #mountain   Sunday July 17th   Bourg-en-Bresse / Culoz   159 km   
    16   #flat   Monday July 18th   Moirans-en-Montagne / Berne   209 km   
    Rest Day   :zzz2   Tuesday July 19th   Berne / Berne

    Stage 10,   #med,   Tuesday July 12th,   Escaldes-Engordany / Revel,197 km   

    Not any kind of rider will be able to take off early and shine on this stage made for spectacular attacks. Only the most determined and solid men will manage to seize their chance when leaving Andorra to immediately take on the climb to the Port d'Envalira. And once in Revel, the final 6-kilometre hill leading to the finish line seems made for the most volatile punchers.






    Km 24.0 - Port d'Envalira (2 408 m) Souvenir Henri Desgrange22.6 kilometre-long climb at 5.5% - category 1
    Km 190.0 - Côte de Saint-Ferréol1.8 kilometre-long climb at 6.6% - category 3





    Another probable break stage Just looking make me think one for Mr Grand Tour himself Adam Hansen

    Stage 11,   #flat,   Wednesday July 13th,   Carcassonne / Montpellier,   162.5 km

    Habits are tough to keep and finishers distinguish themselves by a strong attachment to some territories. They have for instance in recent years made of Montpellier one of the capitals of sprints on the Tour and will do their best to keep that reputation alive. But many will do their best to change habits.




       
    Km 38.0 - Côte de Minerve2.4 kilometre-long climb at 5.4% - category 4
    Km 57.0 - Côte de Villespassans2.3 kilometre-long climb at 4.5% - category 4





    With the GC double header the next 2 stages this should end in a bunch sprint


    Stage 12,   #mountain,   Thursday July 14th,   Montpellier / Mont Ventoux,   185 km

    The Mont Ventoux (bald mount) doesn't carry its name that well when the Tour comes to visit with its hundreds of thousands of spectators coming along. The French National Day will really be a moment of truth for the candidats to Yellow Jersey glory, whether they're French or not. To reach the Observatoire as a winner is the best possible preparation before the remaining part of the event.



       

    Km 131.5 - Côte de Gordes3.3 kilometre-long climb at 4.8% - category 4
    Km 135.5 - Col des Trois Termes2.5 kilometre-long climb at 7.5% - category 3
    Km 184.0 - MONT VENTOUX (1 912 m)15.7 kilometre-long climb at 8.8% - category H





    Bastille day , Mont Ventoux what is more to say

    Stage 13,   #tt,   Friday July 15th,   Bourg-Saint-Andéol / La Caverne du Pont-d'Arc,   37.5 km   

    There'll be a lot at stake for this first time-trial of the Tour. Long enough to manage significant gaps, it won't however exclude the climbers who will try to defend their positions on the roads overlooking the Gorges de l'Ardèche.
    The TV viewers around the world will have the opportunity to admire an incredible panorama.








    After yesterday Many of the GC riders will be looking to limit their losses today. Froome will have looked at stage 12 and 13 as the days he wins the tour

    Stage 14,   #flat,   Saturday July 16th,   Montélimar / Villars-les-Dombes Parc des Oiseaux,   208.5 km

    The sprinters will probably have focused on taking it easy during the previous time-trial.Out of several factors, that precaution could condition their speed on the final straight.Add to that the fact that the final corridor could be struck by a strong head wind which should condemn all breakaway attempts.   





    Km 20.5 - Côte de Puy-Saint-Martin3.6 kilometre-long climb at 5.2% - category 4
    Km 93.5 - Côte du Four-à-Chaux3.9 kilometre-long climb at 4.2% - category 4
    Km 101.5 - Côte d'Hauterives2.1 kilometre-long climb at 5.5% - category 4





    Break or sprint stage as the GC riders lick their wounds

    Stage 15,   #mountain,   Sunday July 17th,   Bourg-en-Bresse / Culoz,   159 km

    Cyclists in the area are used to climbing the Grand Colombier, a fearsome —and feared— mountain pass in the Jura Massif from its four sides. The Tour peloton will face a similar challenge when it tackles the summit from two different sides in the same stage. A tricky descent awaits before the finish in Culoz   





    Km 23.0 - Col du Berthiand (780 m)6 kilometre-long climb at 8.1% - category 1
    Km 52.0 - Col du Sappel (794 m)8.8 kilometre-long climb at 5.6% - category 2
    Km 63.5 - Col de peeeloup4.9 kilometre-long climb at 5.8% - category 3
    Km 79.0 - Col de la Rochette5.1 kilometre-long climb at 5.4% - category 3
    Km 113.0 - Grand Colombier (1 501 m)12.8 kilometre-long climb at 6.8% - category H
    Km 146.0 - Lacets du Grand Colombier (891 m) (D120-D120 A)8.4 kilometre-long climb at 7.6% - category 1







    Really well designed stage for the long range throw the GC on its head stage, enough early climbs to set riders in the break and then attack the GC leader

    stage 16,   #flat,   Monday July 18th,   Moirans-en-Montagne / Berne,   209 km

    Before the alpine sequence of the Tour, the climbers will enjoy a relative break on the road to Berne that goes through the numerous valleys of the Jura area.The pure sprinters shouldn't hope for too much:indeed the hill they'll have to climb in the urban final of the stage could prevent the biggest babies from fighting for victory!   





    Km 183.5 - Côte de Mühleberg1.2 kilometre-long climb at 4.8% - category 4





    Sprint stage for the #vert points and teams looking for their 1st stage win as the pressure mounts

    Rest Day,   :zzz2,   Tuesday July 19th,   Berne / Berne      
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    Re: Le Tour The Big preview
    « Reply #3 on: June 27, 2016, 10:29 »
    STAGE TYPE DATE START & FINISH DISTANCE DETAILS
     
    17   #mountain   Wednesday July 20th   Berne / Finhaut-Emosson   184 km   
    18   #tt   Thursday July 21st   Sallanches / Megève   17 km   
    19   #mountain   Friday July 22nd   Albertville / Saint-Gervais Mont Blanc   146 km   
    20   #mountain   Saturday July 23rd   Megève / Morzine-Avoriaz   146.5 km   
    21   #flat   Sunday July 24th   Chantilly / Paris Champs-Élysées   113 km

    Stage 17,   #mountain   ,Wednesday July 20th,   Berne / Finhaut-Emosson,   184 km   

    From north to south, it'll be a day of discovery and 100% Swiss with a spectacular finish situated at the Emosson dam.There will be opportunities to seize on the sequence of 13 kilometre heading to the summit of the Col de la Forclaz, and then on the 10 kilometres that remained to be covered to reach the Emosson dam.





    Km 72.5 - Côte de Saanenmöser6.6 kilometre-long climb at 4.8% - category 3
    Km 105.0 - Col des Mosses6.4 kilometre-long climb at 4.4% - category 3
    Km 166.5 - Col de la Forclaz (1 527 m)13 kilometre-long climb at 7.9% - category 1
    Km 184.5 - FINHAUT-EMOSSON (1 960 m)10.4 kilometre-long climb at 8.4% - category H





    Day after the 2nd rest day and another interesting day of Climbing on the cars, by this satge we will be hoping 3-4 riders are still a chance for the GC win. If so expect some fireworks

    Stage 18,   #tt,   Thursday July 21st,   Sallanches / Megève,   17 km

    The format isn't that frequent on the Tour but it fits in perfectly to the four-day Alpine sequence of the race.Before reaching Megève, the best climbers among the ‘rouleurs' or the best ‘rouleurs' among the climbers will find a terrain to express themselves on the tough Côte de Domancy and then in the Côte des Chozeaux.   







    A MTT with a downhill finish will be an interesing GC day


    Stage 19,   #mountain,   Friday July 22nd,   Albertville / Saint-Gervais Mont Blanc,   146 km

    .An amazing scenery: the Mont Blanc will be ever present all along the day.It'll also be the opportunity to discover two mountain passes of La Forclaz which will make it a total of three with the swiss Forclaz.Will then follow, the brand new climb up the Mont Bisanne which will hurt the legs of many before the final climb to Le Bettex through the tough paths up the Côte des Amerands   





    Km 42.5 - Col de la Forclaz de Montmin (1 157 m)9.8 kilometre-long climb at 6.9% - category 1
    Km 73.5 - Col de la Forclaz de Queige (870 m)5.6 kilometre-long climb at 7.8% - category 2
    Km 96.5 - Montée de Bisanne (1 723 m)12.4 kilometre-long climb at 8.2% - category H
    Km 146.0 - Le Bettex (1 372 m)9.8 kilometre-long climb at 8% - category 1







    Once again we will be hoping the GC battle is still not over, if it is one for the break with riders in 8-10 attacking each other


    Stage 20,   #mountain,   Saturday July 23rd,   Megève / Morzine-Avoriaz,   146.5 km   

    The Grand Final for the climbers and maybe for the Yellow Jersey will once again be played in the Alps on a short and intense stage for which one will have to keep energy… and cold blood.Indeed after the climbs to the Col de la Ramaz, and then Joux Plane, the Tour could well be decided on a long 12-kilometre downhill portion. A first!





    Km 21.0 - Col des Aravis (1 487 m)6.7 kilometre-long climb at 7% - category 2
    Km 45.5 - Col de la Colombière (1 618 m)11.7 kilometre-long climb at 5.8% - category 1
    Km 93.5 - Col de la Ramaz (1 619 m)13.9 kilometre-long climb at 7.1% - category 1
    Km 134.5 - Col de Joux Plane (1 691 m)11.6 kilometre-long climb at 8.5% - category H










    Possibility of another long range attack today and my favorite French climb Col de Joux Plane and descent into the finsh


    stage 21,   #flat,   Sunday July 24th,   Chantilly / Paris Champs-Élysées,   113 km

    #yellow #vert #kom #white




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    Re: Le Tour The Big preview
    « Reply #4 on: June 27, 2016, 10:30 »




    ~pdf Tour de France / Regulations

    ~pdf Tour de France / Roadbook [159mb] (Mirror #1 / Mirror #2)

    (this is the French speaking version of the Roadbook, an English one may become available at a later point)
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    Re: Le Tour The Big preview
    « Reply #5 on: June 27, 2016, 10:30 »
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    VANMARCKE Sep *be
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    POELS Wout *nl
    HENAO MONTOYA Sergio *co   
    KIRYIENKA Vasil    *by   
    LANDA MEANA Mikel *es
    THOMAS Geraint *gb
    NIEVE Mikel *es
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    CONTADOR Alberto *es   
    KREUZIGER Roman *cz
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  • « Last Edit: June 30, 2016, 10:28 by just some guy »

    just some guy

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    Re: Le Tour The Big preview
    « Reply #6 on: June 27, 2016, 10:31 »


    Great moments in the history of the Tour
    The line between insanity and genius is said to be a fine one, and in early 20thcentury France, anyone envisaging a near-2,500-km-long cycle race across the country would have been widely viewed as unhinged. But that didn’t stop Géo Lefèvre, a journalist with L’Auto magazine at the time, from proceeding with his inspired plan. His editor, Henri Desgrange, was bold enough to believe in the idea and to throw his backing behind the Tour de France. And so it was that, on 1 July 1903, sixty pioneers set out on their bicycles from Montgeron. After six mammoth stages (Nantes - Paris, 471 km!), only 21 “routiers”, led by Maurice Garin, arrived at the end of this first epic.

    Having provoked a mixture of astonishment and admiration, le Tour soon won over the sporting public and the roadside crowds swelled. The French people took to their hearts this unusual event which placed their towns, their countryside and, since 1910, even their mountains, in the spotlight.

    Le Tour has always moved with the times. Like France as a whole, it benefited from the introduction of paid holidays from 1936; it has lived through wars, and then savoured the “trente glorieuses” period of economic prosperity while enjoying the heydays of Coppi, Bobet, Anquetil, Poulidor and it has opened itself up to foreign countries with the onset of globalisation.


    ~pdf Historical guide in French

    The 1903 Tour de France
    The first stage of the first ever Tour de France was a 467 km effort from Paris to Lyon. Maurice Garin - a former chimney sweeper and winner of Paris-Roubaix and Bordeaux-Paris - won the stage after a gruelling 17 hours, 45 minutes and 13 seconds, followed at just 55 seconds by Emile Pagie. The rest of the peloton was much further behind though: number three Léon Georget was already at 34.59. Only 37 out of the 60 starters finished, with the final rider ending over 20 hours down on the first race leader Maurice Garin. The people who had to abandon were allowed to continue on the other days for stage wins, but would be out for the general classification. Pacers were not allowed, and Jean Fischer was punished for employing one.

    In the second stage from Lyon to Marseille, Hippolyte Aucouturier took the stage win in a sprint from Léon Georget. Maurice Garin lost time, but kept the lead with almost 9 minutes on Georget. Aucouturier also won stage 3, the stage in which Garin extended his lead: he now had almost 2 hours on his nearest competitors. Stage 4 saw the first non-French stage winner of the Tour de France: Charles Laeser of Switzerland. Garin confirmed his status as race leader in stage 5, which he won. The sixth and final stage, from Nantes to Paris over 471 km, was also won by Garin: he won the stage and the classification in front of 20.000 supporters in Paris' Parc Des Princes velodrome. He was not given a yellow jersey, but instead a green armbrace to signify his victory. The 21th and final rider finishing all stages ended almost 65 hours down on the race leader, who would go on to buy a gas station with his winnings, 6000 francs.

    The 1904 Tour and beyond
    The 1903 Tour de France was a huge success for L'Auto. The edition for the final stage sold 130.000 copies, and daily sales rose from 25.000 to 65.000. Le Vélo soon went out of business. More importantly though, the Tour de France was born. A 1904 edition was quickly plannen in which the course and rules were the same as the previous year. However, the Tour was so popular that things started going wrong: the second Tour was filled with controversial incidents of cheating, crashes and even riders being beaten up by fans of rivals. Despite four stage wins by Hippolyte Aucouturier, Maurice Garin managed to win the general classification again. However, months after the race all top four riders were disqualified for incidents during the race. The new winner became 19 year old Henri Cornet, who had initially finished almost 3 hours down on Garin. Garin retired from cycling after this, living out the rest of his days at his gas station until he died in 1957.

    Due to all the controversy, Henri Desgranges almost decided the 1904 Tour de France would be the last. However, due to the success of the race and all it had done for the L'Auto newspaper a new edition was planned for 1905 with changed rules. The race now consisted of 11 shorter stages with no nighttime riding, and the overall winner was decided by points rather than by time.
    Furthermore, the first significant mountains were placed on the parcours. Louis Trousselier won the Tour, which continued to capture the collective imagination of France.

    In the years that followed, the points classification remained in place. The mountain stages were also a success and were further expanded upon in following years: The Massif Central was climbed in 1906, the Pyrenees in 1910 and the Alps in 1911. 1909 saw the first non-French winner: Luxembourg rider Francois Faber. By that time, the number of stages had grown to 15. The general classification was revised to be competed on time rather than on points in 1913. The Tour de France was now a yearly feature in French and international media, already the biggest cycling event of the world. Even though World War I got in the way for some years, when it was resumed in 1919 it was as big as ever.

    Rules, teams, and classifications
    Desgrange wanted the Tour de France to be the ultimate competition between individuals. Therefore, he forbade riders from pacing each other during stages. In 1925 this was changed: pacing was now allowed as trade teams returned for the first time since WW1. The length of the race was also increased to 18 days. However, most flat stages were now decided by bunch sprints and riders attacked less often as the sport became more professional. In 1927, Desgrange attempted to fix this by making the race into a team competition where 16 out of the 24 stages were essentially team time trials. Nicolas Frantz of the Alcyon–Dunlop team won this competition and the yellow jersey, which by now was also a common feature of the race. The first yellow jerseys were handed out in 1919 and continued in the years afterward. The colour yellow is significant because it is the colour of the L'Auto newspaper.

    The 1930 Tour de France was significant for a few reasons. It was the first year national teams instead of trade teams were allowed. The extra costs this brought for the Tour, as food and support were now no longer provided by the bike brands, were compensated by the first publicity caravan of the Tour. Also, riders were now allowed to receive help in case they had a mechanical. The national teams remained a fixture in the Tour until 1962, when trade teams finally returned. 1967 and 1978 were again ran by national teams, but in 1969 the trade teams were back for good. In the meantime, another significant change to the Tour had happened: the green jersey for the points classification had been introduced in the 1953 Tour, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the race. It was won by Fritz Schär in the 1953 edition. In 1975, the best climber classification that had been only semi-official for years was given its distinctive polka-dots jersey. In the 1960's, doping scandals became prominent. This caused cycling authorities to put limits on stage distances, leading to the current form of the Tour with transfers by car or plane in between some stages. By this time, the Tour had taken its current form.

    Organisers and politics
    Henri Desgranges organised the Tour de France from its inception in 1903 until he was forced to retire in 1936. He later died in 1940 at the age of 75. Jacques Goddet took over, but soon the World War 2 came in the way. During the war, Goddet refused to organise a Tour despite the Germans offering him the option to. When France was liberated though, L'Auto was disbanded for being too close to the Germans. Goddet started a new newspaper: L'Équipe. In 1946, two rival Tours were organised of each five stages. The one by Goddet and L'Équipe proved to be more popular and restarted the Tour de France in its old format in 1947. L'Équipe was soon taken over by Émilion Amaury. Goddet continued to organise the Tour until 1986. After him, a number of others took over: Jean-Pierre Courcol in 1988, Jean-Pierre Carenso in 1989, and Jean-Marie Leblanc from 1990 until Christian Prudhomme replaced him in 2005. Henri Desgranges is still remembered for his role in creating the race though: the yellow jersey often features his initials on the design.

    Since the start in the 1903 edition, 113 years and 102 editions have passed. The Tour has known great highs with great riders such as Fausto Coppi, Eddie Merckx, Jacques Anquetil and Bernard Hinault fighting for the wins. The best sprinters in the world have embraced the green jersey as one of the most prestigious prizes available for them. Climbers and attackers from all countries dream of winning the polka dots. And young talents hope to see their talent confirmed by wearing the white jersey of the young riders' classification. However, the Tour has also known lows, often concerning doping. Perhaps one of the lowest points of the Tour was the recent saga surrounding Lance Armstrong, whose seven consecutive Tour wins were taken away for doping. Now, the Tour is hoping to leave all that behind them and move on towards a new great era of cycling. It is time to decide who will become the next person in that list of great names who have won the Tour de France. Bring on the 103th edition.

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  • AG

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    Re: Le Tour The Big preview
    « Reply #7 on: June 27, 2016, 10:32 »
    The Critical Stages - Part 1

    The parcour of this Tour is a throwback to the past - in that it goes against the logic of GT's in the past few years and DOESNT have a pan flat, boring first week or 10 days, with all the mountains stacked int he last week.

    With 4 of the first 9 stages classified as high mountain stages, we WILL have action in week 1 - make no mistake.   Then again - 10 out of the 21 stages are high mountain stages, with 3 having a descent finish it is certainly a tour for the climbers.  This is balanced with 2 time trials and quite a few stages for the sprinters.  The rolleurs will have to be good enough to climb over the higher mountains as there is not much in the way of medium mountain stages - but stage 2 has a nice finish that should see one of the hard men in yellow for a time.


    The 3 most critical stages - for me - are actually 2 groups of stages, and then 1 crucial decider.

    The first group - the first real GC action we will see - will be on stages 7, 8 and 9.   Its hard to say exactly which stage it will all happen on, but all 3 of these stages give the opportunity to those who want to have a go to start the push for yellow. 

    Stage 2 should see a punchy rider in yellow (maybe Sagan or GVA), Stage 5 might or might not have some GC action where one of the bigger guns or the top 20 'wannabe's have a bit of a push for the jersey ... but from late in week 1 it will be ON!!!

    Stage 7


    Stage 8


    Stage 9



    Stage 7 is relatively flat for most of the day, with 1 large Cat 1 climb a the end - and a testy descent to the line.  Nibali or Contador may well take the bait to have a little dig and put Froome into trouble, especially if the weather is looking a bit dicey.

    Stage 8 is a sawtooth day that is made for teams like Sky, Movistar and Astana who can set the pace and keep it all day.  with 2 cat 1's, a HC and a cat 2 all after each other ... it will be a tough day in the saddle ... and another testy descent finish

    Stage 9 is the first MTF in the Tour, and my pick for where the action might happen.  With 4 major climbs - and climbing from the beginning - it may be here where some cracks start to appear in the teams that cant follow the engines of Sky.  Look for Froome and Quintana to try and take control here.

    By the first rest day - the big guys will be separated from the rest on GC ...   and some who were hopeful of a good finish will have to reassess.
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  • AG

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    Re: Le Tour The Big preview
    « Reply #8 on: June 27, 2016, 10:32 »
    The Critical Stages - Part 2

    The Time Trials - both of them

    With a 37km rolling Individual Time Trial, and a 17km Mountain Time Trial - the winner of this Tour will have to be comfortable against the clock.

    Last years Tour had only 13 km of individual TT'ing (with a longer TTT) so with 54km this year its a major shift.

    Stage 13 - ITT



    Stage 18 - MTT



    The first test against the clock comes in stage 13 - after the first bout in the mountains and the day after a visit to the epicness of Mont Venteux - those in front will be looking to consolidate and those behind will be looking to gain some time back. 

    Froome, Porte and TJVG will be looking forward to this one immensely.


    The Mountain Time Trial comes on Stage 18 - after much climbing already in this GT, riders will be feeling it in the legs.  Those who are out of contention will be taking it much easier with still 2 more mountain stages to come.

    The chances of Quintana, Nibali and Aru may rest on this stage
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    Re: Le Tour The Big preview
    « Reply #9 on: June 27, 2016, 10:32 »
    The Critical Stages - Part 3


    The third stage that I think will be critical is Stage 17 to Finhaut-Emosson.   It isnt the Queen stage, it isnt the hardest or the longest ... but it will be the one that counts.



    After the action in week 1 - then the individual time trials, this will be where it the final blow is struck - or where the wheels fall off before the MTT the next day.

    There are still 2 more mountain stages afterwards ... but I think by the time this stage and the MTT are done, we will know who is going to be wearing yellow in Paris.



    Its funny - out of all the famous climbs this Tour - Mont Venteux, Mont Blanc, the Tourmelet, Morzine-Avoriaz .... the ones I have chosen as the critical ones are not these.  The more I have looked, the more I like this Tour.   It has a really nice balance - the GC men will have to choose which stages they will go for.  They will have to allow breaks to go, allow others to take some of the stages that fit them well ... as they are spoiled for choice.   

    They will have to be prepared to change their plans along the way too, when others choose different stages to make their play - and some will pay a price for not being adaptable enough.

    This is a Tour where you need a team.  Where your team needs to be strong, and committed, and prepared to ride on the front, at breakneck speeds when you need them too.

    Looking forward to this one a lot.
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  • AG

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    Re: Le Tour The Big preview
    « Reply #10 on: June 27, 2016, 10:33 »
    It's All About Yellow !!!!


    The race for Yellow is on again - and this year we have more true contenders than we have for a while now ... some showing spectacular form already, and some still gaining ground in the spirit of 3 week racing.


    1 - #sky Chris Froome
    :*:*:*:*:*

    Given his history, and form coming in - Chris Froome demands to be rated No 1 - though on results this year it has to be considered that Nairo Quintana would be better.

    Froome hasnt raced much this year - He started at the Herald Sun tour in February (wining it ... but against no real competition for him).  he did Volta a Catalunya in March (finishing 8th behind Quintana), an appearance at LBL (112th) and then Romandie and Dauphine.

    Romandie he finished 37th overall after losing substantial time to a puncture in stage 2.  He did win stage 4 convincingly, but was well out of the GC early.

    Dauphine - Froome won easily, against quality opposition, showing his sparkling form coming in to the Tour.

    The race should suit him mostly - lots of mountains, a long ITT (though it is a bit hilly so less advantageous to him than a purely flat one would be), a MTT and lots of breakaway type stages that offer oportunities for those with very strong teams to take advantage of anyone who challenges or those with good leaders but weak teams.

    The dangers I would suggest would be mainly 2 fold
    - the weather.  Chris Froome does not like the cold and rain.
    - the descents.  There is 3 descent finishes, and the likes of Nibali and Contador will attempt to use those if they have the chance.  Froome CAN descend, and his team are very strong - but he does suffer from confidence issues if he falls early.


    2 -  #movistar Nairo Quintana - :*:*:*:*:*
    Comes to the Tour after having an exceptionally good season to date - but not having raced either of the traditional lead up races.  Quintana instead chose to race the Route du Sud while the big players went to the Dauphine.

    It is interesting that in his career (started in 2011) he has actually never raced either tour de Suisse or the Dauphine

    He started at San Luis in January (3rd overall behind his brother Dayer), then Catalunya (1st), Pais Basque (3rd behind Contador), Romandie (1st) and Route du Sud (1st). 

    After coming 2nd to Froome at the Tour last year and a tired 4th at the Vuelta, Quintana is keen to show that he can add the Tour to his Giro crown

    The race should suit him well enough, his time trialling ability has improved over the last 2 or 3 years, and it is not completely flat.  The MTT will be good for him, and the number of hard climbs will suit him.  He comes here with a very good team, who will support him well, and a super dometisque in Valverde who will work for him without the leadership issues after getting his own chances in the Giro.

    3 -  #tinkoff Alberto Contador - :*:*:*:*:*

    Contador has had a lot more racing in his legs than either of the other 2 contenders - having completed Volta Algarve, Paris Nice, Catalunya, Pais Basque and the Dauphine. 

    He won Pais Basque and has been solid in the other races without being spectacular.  His TT at the Dauphine was superb, but his climbing form not quite there yet, so will be interesting to see if he is setting up his peak for the right time.

    The course suits him perfectly.  Hard, lots of mountains, lots of time trialling that is up and down enough, 3 descent finishes that give him opportunities ... and a good team to support him.

    The fight between the top 3 will be interesting indeed



    4 - #bmc TJ Van Garderen  - :*:*:*:*

    Overall a solid but a little underwhelming prep for TJ.  He thought with the retirement of Cadel Evans that it would be 100% for him from here on out - but then BMC recruited Ritchie Porte and TJVG has to fight once again for the opportunities and leadership within the team

    Starting at Andalucia (2nd), Tireno Adriatico (25th) with no mountain stages, Catalunya (5th) and tour de Suisse (6th) he failed to actually win any GC, and while he did win a stage in Switzerland - it was not the result he was hoping for.  Still, between him and Porte it will be a toss up.  Whichever of them fails first will have to work for the other.

    The course is not too bad for TJ here.  A few too many high mountains for the big guns (with big teams) to work him over on I think. 

    The other major issue may be his lack of team support.  If Porte loses time early and then rides for TJ, things will work out substantially better for him .... but if they are both riding for themselves, BMC dont have a lot of other support for the high mountains, and may find it tough to defend yellow if put to the sword.


    5 - #bmc Richie Porte  - :*:*:*:*

    A underwhelming start to the year for Porte as well - considering his start last year when he won everything he even looked at.

    Tour Down Under (2nd)  (and no national champs jersey that he REALLY wanted), Tour of Oman, Paris Nice (3rd) Catalunya (4th) LBL (91) and 4th at the Dauphine.   All of the racing though has been without settling the world on fire - and his last (and only) actual win was a stage Down Under back in January.

    The Tour route actually suits Porte well.  He can climb, he can TT, he can do everything here - but can he do it for 3 weeks running?   He has never finished anywhere near a podium of a GT since his 7th in his very first Giro.  Every time - through his own error, illness or bad luckor other circumstance he has lost large amounts of time at some point or another. 

    In addition - he needs to outlast TJVG for leadership of the BMC team.   Up against the might of the Sky, Movistar, Tinkoff and Astana teams, BMC need to have both their superstars riding for the same goal.  Otherwise neither will do anything.

    6 -  #astana Vincenzo Nibali  - :*:*:*

    I have rated Nibali above Aru simply because - well, he is Nibali.  With 4 GT titles in the bank already, he is a proven performer on the big stage.   Yes he will be tired from the Giro - and yes the last week will be very tough on him - but with Aru faltering in the last few weeks, Astana may still look to Nibbles to save the day.  He has shown that he will never, ever give up.  Even when it looks like all is lost.

    The course suits him well enough.  A few hard stages grouped together, then a rest day.  High mountains and time trials wont hold much fear - and with those tantalising descent finishes, and Alberto to counter attack with ... Froome should be watching those stages carefully.

    7 -  #astana Fabio Aru  -  :*:*:*

    Would have probably have been a bit higher in the ratings, but his season thus far hasnt been so sparkling - and with a decidedly average showing in the Dauphine he has lowered his expectations of this Tour somewhat.   Will be interesting to see how the team dynamics play out.




    1+2 :*  top 10 contenders who might go well if things go their way

    Romain Bardet
    Thibaut Pinot
    Domenico Pozzovivo
    Alejandro Valverde
    Pierre Rolland
    Adam Yates
    Joaquim Rodrigez
    Bauke Mollema

    any of these guys could end up being a big part of proceedings - or could just as easily be out of it by stage 3.  With the Tour - well anything can happen.
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  • « Last Edit: June 27, 2016, 10:55 by AG »

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    Re: Le Tour The Big preview
    « Reply #11 on: June 27, 2016, 10:35 »
    #green Classement par points

    The points classification of the Tour de France has a long history, going back to 1905 when the decision was made to determine the winner of the yellow jersey by points instead of a time system. And although it was changed back in 1912 the points system was reintroduced in 1953 to celebrate the 50th birthday of the Tour de France - this time as an additional classification, with the leader wearing the green jersey. And so he does for 63 years now.

    The details of where to score how many points have been adjusted several times, with the last major change in 2011 - and another minor one last year, as the current points system seemed to favor an allrounder over a sprinter too much.

    Points awarded at the finish (by stage category):

    cat. 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th
    #flat Flat   50      30      20      18      16      14      12      10      8      7
    #med Hilly   30      25      22      19      17      15      13      11      9      7
    #mountain Mountain   20      17      15      13      11      10      9      8      7      6
    #tt Time Trial   20      17      15      13      11      10      9      8      7      6
    + minor points for place 11-15

    Points awarded at the intermediate sprint are the same on every type of stage (apart from time trials of course):

    1st2nd3rd4th5th6th7th8th9th10th1112131415
    201715131110987654321

    ...with the stages being categorized in the following way:
    • #flat Flat Stages: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 11, 14, 16, 21
    • #med Hilly Stages: 5, 7, 10, 12
    • #mountain Mountain Stages: 8, 9, 15, 17, 19, 20
    • #tt Time Trials: 13, 18
    so with 9 possible sprint stages à 50 points on the line, the rules still clearly favor a sprinter to win the jersey, eventhough the stage 2 finish is likely to be too hard for most of them. The opportunities to score big points mainly come pretty early in the race with five out of nine sprint stages in the first week. Therefor the battle for green is also likely to come down to motivation, because a sprinter who has scored many points in the first couple of days, will need to be able to fight through the mountain stages to reach the finish and defend his jersey.

    Since 2011 the importance of the intermediate sprints has been increased and they have had a major influence on Sagan's dominance. Most of those are fairly flat this year though, and only on stage 9, 15 and 20 they are located at places which may favor stronger climbers over pure sprinters.

    Favorites for the Maillot Vert:



    Peter Sagan has won the jersey four times in a row now, and the World Champion is the most complete rider in the peloton, so he obviously is the favorite to take it again. Despite dominating the fight for green he hasn't won a stage since 2013 though, so he may focus on that more than on green, and he looked a bit ominous after his crash in the Tour de Suisse, so it remains to be seen, with what shape, plans and team duties he arrives in Mont-Saint-Michel.

    Mark Cavendish is the only other rider on the startlist who has won the jersey before, but he seems to lack the speed to compete with Marcel Kittel, who managed to come back in shape this season after his problems in 2015, and may very well dominate the sprints. He has never really shown interest in Green in the past though and most of the time didn't compete in the intermediate sprints. Eight potential stage wins could be enough to still win the jersey though.

    With the French sprinters it's a different story, they usually go full out on all fronts, and especially Coquard has had a stellar season so far. It remains to be seen if he is quick enough to take enough points in the flat sprints though.

    Greipel came 2nd in 2012 and last year, Kristoff in 2014, and Bouhanni won the classification in the Giro last year, so they obviously can't be discounted, but it's difficult to see on which terrain they really have enough of an advantage to win. Other potential contenders are more allrounder type of riders like Degenkolb or Matthews, but they probably only stand a chance if Sagan really struggles.
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    Re: Le Tour The Big preview
    « Reply #12 on: June 27, 2016, 10:36 »
    #kom Classement du meilleur grimpeur

    The mountain classification in the Tour de France was introduced over 80 years ago, but although the best climber was first recognised already in 1933, the distinctive maillot blanc à pois rouges was not introduced until 1975, when the colours were decided by the then sponsor, Chocolat Poulain, whose chocolate bars were covered in a polka dot wrapper. In recent years we have seen breakaway specialists like Thomas Voeckler or Anthony Charteau winning the jersey, but also gc riders like Nairo Quintana and Chris Froome, who was the first winner of the Tour to also wear the polka dot jersey on the podium in Paris - as it wasn't introduced yet, when Eddy Merckx won both in 1970.

    Same as for the points classification, the scoring system has changed several times, and they are now distributed according to the following classification:

    Type de côte 1er 2e 3e 4e 5e 6e 7e 8e 9e 10e
    Hors catégorie 25 20 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2
    1re catégorie 10 8 6 4 2 1
    2e catégorie 5 3 2 1
    3e catégorie 2 1
    4e catégorie 1

    The points for a mountain top finish are doubled, if that mountain is HC, category 1, or category 2. In this year's edition that's the case for the 9th, 12th, 17th and 19th stages. That means, the following maximum allocation of points is available during the stages and at the finish:

    STAGE Pt. / Underway Pt. / at Finish
    Stage 1      Mont-St.-Michel - St.-Marie-du-Mont      1+1      
    Stage 2      Saint-Lô - Cherbourg-en-Cotentin    1+1+1      2
    Stage 3      Granville - Angers    1      
    Stage 4      Saumur - Limoges    1      
    Stage 5      Limoges - Le Lioran      1+2+2+5+5+2      
    Stage 6      Arpajon-sur-Cère - Montauban    2+1+2      
    Stage 7      L'Isle-Jourdain - Lac de Payolle    1+10      
    Stage 8      Pau - Bagnères-de-Luchon    25+5+10+10      
    Stage 9      Vielha Val d'Aran - Andorre Arcalis       10+10+5+10      50
    Stage 10      Escaldes-Engordany    10+2      
    Stage 11      Carcassonne - Montpellier    1+1      
    Stage 12      Montpellier - Mont Ventoux   1+2      50
    Stage 13      Bourg-St-Andéol - Pont-d'Arc (ITT)         
    Stage 14      Montélimar - Villars-les-Dombes   1+1+1      
    Stage 15      Bourg-en-Bresse - Culoz       10+5+2+2+25+10      
    Stage 16      Moirans-en-Montagne - Berne      1      
    Stage 17      Berne - Finhaut-Emosson   2+2+10      50
    Stage 18      Sallanches - Megève (ITT)         
    Stage 19      Albertville - Saint-Gervais Mont Blanc    10+5+25      20
    Stage 20      Megève - Morzine    5+10+10+25      
    Stage 21      Chantilly - Paris/Champs-Élysées    1      
                      
    TOTAL            285      172

    In several of those stages, the harder climbs come late in the stage, which could favor a gc rider to take the maillot blanc à pois rouges, but a breakaway specialist can't be discounted as well, especially if he manages to stay clear and win on one of the HC mountain top finishes.

    And in case it may end up to be really close... "in the event of a tie between two riders in the general best climber ranking, the rider with the most first places at highest level pass summits is declared the winner. If the riders are still tied, the first places obtained in 30 the category 1 passes will be used to determine the winner. If necessary, the first places achieved at the summits of category 2, category 3 or category 4 passes or hills will be taken; as a last resort, the final general time ranking will be used."

    Favorites for the Maillot Blanc à Pois Rouges



    It's difficult to name clear favorites to win the mountain classification as it always is determined by the outcome of the general classification as well, with riders casting an eye on the jersey only after losing time in gc - but generally, apart from the top gc riders like Froome, Quintana or Contador, it should favor riders who have been successful in the past are are never afraid to attack if they get the freedom to, like for example Majka or Voeckler. Also strong climbers like Nibali, Barguil or maybe Pozzovivo could come in play though, if they lose time early on in the Tour.
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    Re: Le Tour The Big preview
    « Reply #13 on: June 27, 2016, 10:36 »
    #white Classement du meilleur jeune

    The white jersey for the best young rider was first introduced in 1975 and is awarded to the rider with the highest position in the general classification, not born before January 1st 1991. The list of winners in recent years include some of the best riders in the world and favorite for this years' Maillot Jaune, with Nairo Quintana taking it in both his Tour de France participations 2013 and 2015, Tejay van Garderen and Thibaut Pinot the years before and between

    With Alberto Contador, Pierre Rolland, van Garderen, Quintana and Pinot there are five former winners on the start list for this year's edition, but all of them are too old to figh for white by now, so we will definitely see a new winner, and Jan Ullrich and Andy Schleck will remain the only riders to have won the jersey three times.

    Favorites for the Maglia Bianca:



    Last year it was very easy to predict the winner for the white jersey, when Nairo Quintana was still eligible as a rider who had already finished on the podium of the Tour before - this year it's a bit of a different story, with Warren Barguil as the rider with the highest ranking so far - which is a 14th place in 2015.

    Still, Barguil was looking much better than that for most of the Tour last year, and thereby should be the favorite to wear the jersey in Paris this time. But Kelderman was 7th in the Giro already, and Alaphilippe has looked more and more promising on the climbs as well this year. Louis Meintjes finishes 10th in the Vuelta last year, so he can't be discounted as well although he didn't really have the best of a season so far.

    Adam Yates has completed two Grand Tours now without having set an eye on the GC, so it will be a new experience for him and it remains to be seen how he can cope with a three weeks at full gas, but if he can, he could come into play as well. Sepulveda, Buchmann and Berhane may not have that level right now, but especially Fortuneo and Boro as wild card teams will eye a good result in the Top 20 of the general classification anyway, and with a bit of luck that could be enough to fight for white as well.
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    Re: Le Tour The Big preview
    « Reply #14 on: June 27, 2016, 10:37 »
    TV Coverage

    Although an enormous amount of channels all over the globe will cover the Tour de France live, the preferred option for most of us will probably still be Eurosport. As usual they will support their live coverage with a raft of analysis programmes and highlights packages, ensuring that viewers will not miss any of the action.

    In the UK, Carlton Kirby and Sean Kelly will provide live commentary. Tour de France Extra will be broadcast immediately before and after each stage, hosted by Ashley House and former pro Juan Antonio Flecha.

    Earlier this year it was announced that all stages of the Tour would be covered live from the start to the finish, but some people may have missed that it was an announcement for 2017. This time, we will still get the normal amount of live coverage in the afternoon for most of the stages, and only the most important ones (well, and the first one) are broadcasted live in its entirety.

    DATESTAGEDISTANCETIME(cest)
    Thursday June 30Team Presentation18:30 - 20:00
    Saturday July 2nd1 #flatMont-Saint-Michel / Utah Beach Sainte-Marie-du-Mont188 km12:45 - 17:15
    Sunday July 3rd2 #flatSaint-Lô / Cherbourg-en-Cotentin183 km14:00 - 17:15
    Monday July 4th3 #flatGranville / Angers223.5 km14:00 - 17:45
    Tuesday July 5th4 #flatSaumur / Limoges237.5 km14:00 - 17:45
    Wednesday July 6th5 #mountainLimoges / Le Lioran216 km14:00 - 17:45
    Thursday July 7th6 #flatArpajon-sur-Cère / Montauban190.5 km14:00 - 17:45
    Friday July 8th7 #mountainL'Isle-Jourdain / Lac de Payolle162.5 km14:00 - 17:45
    Saturday July 9th8 #mountainPau / Bagnères-de-Luchon184 km14:00 - 17:45
    Sunday July 10th9 #mountainVielha Val d'Aran / Andorre Arcalis184 km11:45 - 17:30
    Tuesday July 12th10 #medEscaldes-Engordany / Revel197 km13:45 - 17:45
    Wednesday July 13th11 #flatCarcassonne / Montpellier162.5 km13:45 - 17:45
    Thursday July 14th12 #mountainMontpellier / Mont Ventoux185 km13:45 - 17:45
    Friday July 15th13 #ttBourg-Saint-Andéol / La Caverne du Pont-d'Arc37.5 km13:45 - 17:45
    Saturday July 16th14 #flatMontélimar / Villars-les-Dombes Parc des Oiseaux208.5 km13:45 - 17:45
    Sunday July 17th15 #mountainBourg-en-Bresse / Culoz159 km11:45 - 17:45
    Monday July 18th16 #flatMoirans-en-Montagne / Berne209 km14:00 - 17:30
    Wednesday July 20th17 #mountainBerne / Finhaut-Emosson184 km13:45 - 17:45
    Thursday July 21st18 #ttSallanches / Megève17 km14:00 - 17:45
    Friday July 22nd19 #mountainAlbertville / Saint-Gervais Mont Blanc146 km11:45 - 17:45
    Saturday July 23rd20 #mountainMegève / Morzine-Avoriaz146.5 km11:45 - 17:45
    Sunday July 24th21 #flatChantilly / Paris Champs-Élysées113 km16:00 - 20:00
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