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Le Tour 2017 Big Preview
« on: June 21, 2017, 10:16 »
Tour de France 2017

Sporting aspects
The route

Running from Saturday July 1st to Sunday July 23rd 2017, the 104th Tour de France will be made up of 21 stages and will cover a total distance of 3,540 kilometres.
- 9 flat stages
- 5 hilly stages
- 5 mountain stages including altitude finishes (La Planche des Belles Filles, Peyragudes, Izoard)
- 2 individual time-trials stages
- 2 rest days
The 2017 Tour de France will include a total of 23 mountains climbs or hills and altitude finishes ranked in second, first or HC class.

The geographic distribution will be as follow:

- 1 in the Vosges
- 6 in the Jura
- 8 in the Pyrénées
- 2 in the Massif central
- 6 in the Alps

Distinctive aspects of the race

HEXAGON + 3
The 104th Tour de France will visit three neighboring countries: Germany, Belgium and Luxemburg. In France, 34 counties will be visited.

25 YEARS AFTER...
It hadn’t happened since 1992. The five main mountain ranges of France will be on the program in 2017. The Tour will visit, in the following order, the Vosges, the Jura, the Pyrenees, the Massif Central and the Alps. The highlight will be the very first stage finish at the top of the Col d’Izoard.

OPENING AND (ALMOST) FINISH IN SOLO
It’ll be after a 14-kilometre time-trial in the streets of Düsseldorf that the first Yellow Jersey of the 2017 Tour de France will be awarded. In Marseille, after the 20th and penultimate stage, a 22.5 kilometre time-trial, the winner of the 104th edition of the Grande Boucle will be crowned.

BONUSES
Re-introduced in 2015 after a seven-year absence, bonus seconds will again be up for grabs at the finishes of all the normal stages. There will indeed be 10, 6 and 4 seconds to be gained for the first three of each stage.

POINTS
The green jersey will be awarded to the leader of the points classification. These points will be given out at the finishes of each stage as well as on the unique intermediate sprints of normal stages.
The polka-dot jersey will be on the shoulders of the leader of the best climbers’ classification. Points will be awarded at the top of each Col or Côte and the three altitude finishes (La Planche des Belles Filles, Peyragudes, Izoard).

10 new sites and stage cities

šDüsseldorf (1st stage and start of stage 2)
Mondorf-les-Bains (start of stage 4)
šNuits-Saint-Georges (finish of stage 7)
Nantua (start of stage 9)
Eymet (start of stage 11)
šLaissac-Sévérac l’Église (start of stage 15)
Romans-sur-Isère (finish of stage 16)
La Mure (start of stage 17)
šIzoard (finish of stage 18)
Salon-de-Provence (finish of stage 19)


Infomation source and Race :web :twitter
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  • Of course, if this turns out someday to be the industry standard integrated handlebar-computer-braking solution then I'll eat my kevlar-reinforced aerodynamic hat.

    Larri Nov 12, 2014

    just some guy

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    Re: Le Tour 2017 Big Preview
    « Reply #1 on: June 21, 2017, 10:17 »
    Stages
    Stage: 1 - 1 July : Düsseldorf ITT 13.00 km #tt
    Stage: 2 - 2 July : Düsseldorf - Liège 202.00 km #flat
    Stage: 3 - 3 July : Verviers - Longwy 202.00 km #med
    Stage: 4 - 4 July : Mondorf-les-Bains - Vittel 203.00 km #flat
    Stage: 5 - 5 July : Vittel - La Planche des Belles Filles 160.00 km #med
    Stage: 6 - 6 July : Vesoul - Troyes 216.00 km #flat
    Stage: 7 - 7 July : Troyes - Nuits-Saint-Georges 214.00 km #flat
    Stage: 8 - 8 July : Dole - Station des Rousses 187.00 km #med
    Stage: 9 - 9 July : Nantua - Chambéry 181.00 km #mountain
    Rest Day 1: Monday July 10th   Dordogne :zzz2
    Stage: 10 - 11 July : Périgueux - Bergerac 178.00 km #flat
    Stage: 11 - 12 July : Eymet - Pau 202.00 km #flat
    Stage: 12 - 13 July : Pau - Peyragudes 214.00 km #mountain
    Stage: 13 - 14 July : Saint-Girons - Foix 100.00 km #mountain
    Stage: 14 - 15 July : Blagnac - Rodez 181.00 km #med
    Stage: 15 - 16 July : Laissac-Sévérac l'Église - Le Puy-en-Velay 189.00 km #med
    Rest Day 2:Monday July 17th   Le Puy-en-Velay :zzz2
    Stage: 16 - 18 July : Le Puy-en-Velay - Romans-sur-Isère 165.00 km #flat
    Stage: 17 - 19 July : La Mure - Serre-Chevalier 183.00 km #mountain
    Stage: 18 - 20 July : Briançon - Izoard 178.00 km #mountain
    Stage: 19 - 21 July : Embrun - Salon-de-Provence 220.00 km #flat
    Stage: 20 - 22 July : Marseille ITT 23.00 km #tt
    Stage: 21 - 23 July : Montgeron - Paris 105.00 km #flat
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  • just some guy

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    Re: Le Tour 2017 Big Preview
    « Reply #2 on: June 21, 2017, 10:17 »
    Stages first week
    Stage: 1 - 1 July : Düsseldorf ITT 13.00 km #tt
    Stage: 2 - 2 July : Düsseldorf - Liège 202.00 km #flat
    Stage: 3 - 3 July : Verviers - Longwy 202.00 km #med
    Stage: 4 - 4 July : Mondorf-les-Bains - Vittel 203.00 km #flat
    Stage: 5 - 5 July : Vittel - La Planche des Belles Filles 160.00 km #med
    Stage: 6 - 6 July : Vesoul - Troyes 216.00 km #flat
    Stage: 7 - 7 July : Troyes - Nuits-Saint-Georges 214.00 km #flat
    Stage: 8 - 8 July : Dole - Station des Rousses 187.00 km #med
    Stage: 9 - 9 July : Nantua - Chambéry 181.00 km #mountain

    Stage: 1 - 1 July : Düsseldorf ITT, 13.00 km, #tt


    Of the 13 kilometres of the inaugural time-trial course, close to 10 will be set on the banks of the Rhine river or the bridges above it… and bends can be counted on the fingers of both hands! There will be no or almost no mystery: the “rouleurs” will have their word to say. In this speciality where a new generation is showing up, a multiple world-champion boosted by the support of his fans could well be the fastest man





    Stage: 2 - 2 July : Düsseldorf - Liège, 202.00 km, #flat

    Most of the stage will take place in Germany. During the last visits to Liège during the 21st century, the riders battled it out on time-trials while those who normally shine on Liège-Bastogne-Liège are among the best punchers of the moment. This time, a sprint victory is to be expected on the boulevard de la Sauvenière.





    Km 6.5 - Côte de Grafenberg1.4 kilometre-long climb at 4.5% - category 4
    Km 183.0 - Côte d'Olne1.3 kilometre-long climb at 4.7% - category 4



    Stage: 3 - 3 July : Verviers - Longwy, 202.00 km, #med

    A coincidence or destiny, the Tour will take off from Verviers just two days before the 35th birthday of the city's native, Philippe Gilbert. And the day's course could well inspire the Wallonian. Indeed the climb going up to the Longwy Citadel looks a lot like the Mont des Alouettes where he had conquered his only stage win on the Tour in 2011. Whatever the outcome, the punchers will be on attacking soil, and the Yellow Jersey will be up for grabs





    Km 18.0 - Côte de Sart2.8 kilometre-long climb at 5.1% - category 4
    Km 105.5 - Côte de Wiltz3.1 kilometre-long climb at 4.8% - category 4
    Km 120.5 - Côte d'Eschdorf2.3 kilometre-long climb at 9.3% - category 3
    Km 197.0 - Côte de Villers-la-Montagne1.1 kilometre-long climb at 5.2% - category 4
    Km 212.5 - LONGWY - Côte des Religieuses1.6 kilometre-long climb at 5.8% - category 3





    Stage: 4 - 4 July : Mondorf-les-Bains - Vittel, 203.00 km, #flat

    Passing through Schengen and before returning to French territory, the peloton will have confirmation it can go around freely… Without major difficulties, this stage should offer a second opportunity to the sprinters. Beware however, the roads of Meurthe-et-Moselle could be swept by the wind and that could represent a menace for the title contenders.





    Km 170.5 - Col des Trois Fontaines1.9 kilometre-long climb at 7.4% - category 4



    Stage: 5 - 5 July : Vittel - La Planche des Belles Filles, 160.00 km, #med

    It only took two stage finishes there for La Planche des Belles Filles to add its name to the history of the Tour. The climb is rather short however it's extremely demanding, especially on the final part. The gradients indeed reach 20%. It'll be a first explanation between the favourites.





    Km 107.5 - Côte d'Esmoulières2.3 kilometre-long climb at 8% - category 3
    Km 160.5 - LA PLANCHE DES BELLES FILLES (1035 m)5.9 kilometre-long climb at 8.5% - category 1



    Stage: 6 - 6 July : Vesoul - Troyes, 216.00 km, #flat

    The sprint purists will have dissected and appreciated the possible scenario dictated on this flat stage by the teams of the best specialists. Riding through the Plateau de Langres, and passing through Colombeyles-Deux-Églises, the chase of the escapees should be perfectly planned. It'll then be the turn of the lead out trains to take command on the large avenues of the centre of Troyes.





    Km 69.0 - Côte de Langres1.3 kilometre-long climb at 6.3% - category 4
    Km 154.0 - Côte de la colline Sainte-Germaine3.1 kilometre-long climb at 4.4% - category 4



    Stage: 7 - 7 July : Troyes - Nuits-Saint-Georges, 214.00 km, #flat

    The globally flat course seems perfectly suited for a revenge between the sprinters, frustrated by the outcome of the previous day. However the final loop of 40 kilometres will see the peloton battle it out in the sidewind and some teams will certainly make the best of it. The Burgundy vineyard homelands are indeed registered on the World Heritage of Humanity sites.





    Km 147.5 - Côte d'Urcy2.5 kilometre-long climb at 4.2% - category 4



    Stage: 8 - 8 July : Dole - Station des Rousses, 187.00 km, #med

    “Made in Jura”, that's how this stage could be qualified as it will take place entirely in that area. On this part of the Jura mountain range, the climbs will offer a good opportunity to breakaway riders at their best. Last of the three climbs on the menu, the Côte de la Combe de Laisia Les Molunes, and its summit just 11kms from the finish, will be a perfect scene for the best of them to make a difference





    Km 101.5 - Col de la Joux6.1 kilometre-long climb at 4.7% - category 3
    Km 138.5 - Côte de Viry (748 m)7.6 kilometre-long climb at 5.2% - category 2
    Km 175.5 - Côte de la Combe de Laisia-Les Molunes (1 202 m)11.7 kilometre-long climb at 6.4% - category 1



    Stage: 9 - 9 July : Nantua - Chambéry, 181.00 km, #mountain

    Even in the Alps and the Pyrenees, climbs with average gradients of close to 10% on their entire length are pretty rare. There will be three on this Jura stage with a total ascending elevation of 4600 metres. The riders will first discover the climb up the Col de la Biche, followed by the unprecedented and fearsome side of the Grand Colombier, known as the Directissime (gradients up to 22%), and will finish the battle off with the Mont du Chat, not on the Tour map since 1974





    Km 3.5 - Côte des Neyrolles3.2 kilometre-long climb at 7.2% - category 2
    Km 11.0 - Col de Bérentin4.1 kilometre-long climb at 6.1% - category 3
    Km 38.0 - Côte de Franclens2.4 kilometre-long climb at 6% - category 3
    Km 67.5 - Col de la Biche (Croix de Famban) (1 316 m)10.5 kilometre-long climb at 9% - category H
    Km 91.0 - Grand Colombier (1 501 m)8.5 kilometre-long climb at 9.9% - category H
    Km 134.0 - Côte de Jongieux3.9 kilometre-long climb at 4.2% - category 4
    Km 155.5 - Mont du Chat (1 504 m)8.7 kilometre-long climb at 10.3% - category H







    Rest Day 1
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  • « Last Edit: June 27, 2017, 15:02 by just some guy »

    just some guy

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    Re: Le Tour 2017 Big Preview
    « Reply #3 on: June 21, 2017, 10:18 »
    Stages 2nd week
    Stage: 10 - 11 July : Périgueux - Bergerac 178.00 km #flat
    Stage: 11 - 12 July : Eymet - Pau 202.00 km #flat
    Stage: 12 - 13 July : Pau - Peyragudes 214.00 km #mountain
    Stage: 13 - 14 July : Saint-Girons - Foix 100.00 km #mountain
    Stage: 14 - 15 July : Blagnac - Rodez 181.00 km #med
    Stage: 15 - 16 July : Laissac-Sévérac l'Église - Le Puy-en-Velay 189.00 km #med

    Stage: 10 - 11 July : Périgueux - Bergerac, 178.00 km, #flat

    After a rest day in Dordogne, the debates resume in a romantic and peaceful atmosphere. But the challenge of winning a stage will stop the possible inclination to take it easy, notably when the pack moves closer to the Lascaux Grotto which will have its entire replica drawings available to see as of next December. Whether they're enthusiasts of cave arts or not, the riders will be mainly focused on the sprint to take on, (or avoid, depending on the actors) in Bergerac






    Km 100.5 - Côte de Domme3.5 kilometre-long climb at 3.3% - category 4
    Km 138.5 - Côte du Buisson-de-Cadouin2.1 kilometre-long climb at 5.6% - category 4



    Stage: 11 - 12 July : Eymet - Pau, 202.00 km, #flat

    The Tour gets closer to its Pyrenean base but mountain specialists will still be preserving their energy. Going through the areas of Les Landes and Gers, the command of the pack will probably be left to the teams of sprinters. The escapees having made the effort to take off will, why not, have the opportunity to make a prayer at the Notre-Dame-des-Cyclistes Chapel, situated in Labastide-d'Armagnac.





    Km 145.5 - Côte d'Aire-sur-l'Adour1.2 kilometre-long climb at 4.2% - category 4



    Stage: 12 - 13 July : Pau - Peyragudes, 214.00 km, #mountain

    The longest stage of the Pyrenean stay will be made of an extremely difficult sequence of climbs. As kilometres are covered, it'll only get harder with the climb up to the Col de Menté, even more selective with the Port de Balès and will become a real agony for the legs in the new final climb to Peyragudes. In the final kilometre, on the runway of the only airport of the Pyrenees, will be a passage at 16% over a distance of 200 metres.





    Km 64.0 - Côte de Capvern7.7 kilometre-long climb at 3.1% - category 4
    Km 111.5 - Col des Ares (797 m)7.4 kilometre-long climb at 4.6% - category 2
    Km 139.5 - Col de Menté (1 349 m)6.9 kilometre-long climb at 8.1% - category 1
    Km 184.0 - Port de Balès (1 755 m)11.7 kilometre-long climb at 7.7% - category H
    Km 209.5 - Col de Peyresourde (1 569 m)9.7 kilometre-long climb at 7.8% - category 1
    Km 214.5 - PEYRAGUDES (1 580 m)2.4 kilometre-long climb at 8.4% - category 2



    Stage: 13 - 14 July : Saint-Girons - Foix, 100.00 km, #mountain

    Precisely 100. In terms of kilometres, never has such a short format been on the menu of the Tour since halfstages disappeared. It'll be a total contrast compared to what the riders witnessed on the previous day but the terrain will be just as favourable for, I hope, audacious initiatives. Dynamism linked to distance will be joined by a degree of difficulty in the climbs: the Col de Latrape followed by the Col d'Agnes and finally the Mur de Péguère and its gradients that can reach 18%.





    Km 31.0 - Col de Latrape (1 110 m)5.6 kilometre-long climb at 7.3% - category 1
    Km 46.5 - Col d'Agnes (1 570 m)10 kilometre-long climb at 8.2% - category 1
    Km 74.0 - Mur de Péguère (1 375 m)9.3 kilometre-long climb at 7.9% - category 1







    Stage: 14 - 15 July : Blagnac - Rodez, 181.00 km, #med

    The countryside of the south-west, whether it's in Tarn or Aveyron offers outstanding viewpoints. Sweet to the eyes are the aerial shots of the countless little valleys that are however tough on the legs of the riders on solid ground. The stage will be demanding. In these conditions, the Côte Saint-Pierre will offer a splendid launch pad to a puncher





    Km 131.0 - Côte du viaduc du Viaur2.3 kilometre-long climb at 7% - category 3
    Km 145.0 - Côte de Centrès2.3 kilometre-long climb at 7.7% - category 3



    Stage: 15 - 16 July : Laissac-Sévérac l'Église - Le Puy-en-Velay, 189.00 km, #med

    Hard to tell in what state or shape the peloton will be at the end of this stage. It won't be mountains but the journey through the Aubrac Plateau will be covered at an altitude of over 1000 metres during around fifty kilometres. Further away, the climb up to the Col de Peyra Taillade has gradients of 14% at some places. And that could certainly offer surprises when comes the time for a verdict in Le Puy-en-Velay.





    Km 28.5 - Montée de Naves d'Aubrac (1 058 m)8.9 kilometre-long climb at 6.4% - category 1
    Km 43.5 - Côte de Vieurals3.3 kilometre-long climb at 5.9% - category 3
    Km 158.0 - Col de Peyra Taillade (1 190 m)8.3 kilometre-long climb at 7.4% - category 1
    Km 176.5 - Côte de Saint-Vidal1.9 kilometre-long climb at 6.8% - category 4





    Rest Day 2





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    Re: Le Tour 2017 Big Preview
    « Reply #4 on: June 21, 2017, 10:19 »
    Stages 3rd week
    Stage: 16 - 18 July : Le Puy-en-Velay - Romans-sur-Isère 165.00 km #flat
    Stage: 17 - 19 July : La Mure - Serre-Chevalier 183.00 km #mountain
    Stage: 18 - 20 July : Briançon - Izoard 178.00 km #mountain
    Stage: 19 - 21 July : Embrun - Salon-de-Provence 220.00 km #flat
    Stage: 20 - 22 July : Marseille ITT 23.00 km #tt
    Stage: 21 - 23 July : Montgeron - Paris 105.00 km #flat

    Stage: 16 - 18 July : Le Puy-en-Velay - Romans-sur-Isère, 165.00 km, #flat

    The roads of the day are perfectly known by the amateur riders of the Ardéchoise cyclosportive, with a topography that could give confidence to breakaway riders. But finishes in the Rhône Valley often end up with bunched sprints… unless the wind plays a role.





    Km 20.5 - Côte de Boussoulet4.5 kilometre-long climb at 6.3% - category 3
    Km 65.0 - Col du Rouvey2.8 kilometre-long climb at 5.6% - category 4



    Stage: 17 - 19 July : La Mure - Serre-Chevalier, 183.00 km, #mountain

    Climbers battling it out for the Yellow Jersey will have two more days to express themselves, to change the outcome or comfort a decent lead and gain precious time. Heading towards Serre-Chevalier, we will give them the most prestigious of what the Alps has to offer: the Col de la Croix de Fer and then the Galibier back after a 6-year absence, going up the Télégraphe. It's now up to them





    Km 30.0 - Col d'Ornon5.1 kilometre-long climb at 6.7% - category 2
    Km 78.5 - Col de la Croix de Fer (2 067 m)24 kilometre-long climb at 5.2% - category H
    Km 132.5 - Col du Télégraphe (1 566 m)11.9 kilometre-long climb at 7.1% - category 1
    Km 155.0 - Col du Galibier (2 642 m) Souvenir Henri Desgrange17.7 kilometre-long climb at 6.9% - category H








    Stage: 18 - 20 July : Briançon - Izoard, 178.00 km, #mountain

    It'll be the final battle between the climbers at the heart of one of the most spectacular and surprising sports theaters there is to offer. A real inspiration for attackers with temperament. From Barcelonnette to the Col de Vars, spirits and legs will be on fire. The last ten kilomeres before the summit of the Izoard are at an average gradient of 9%. The “rendez-vous” of the Casse Déserte will add solemnity to the hardness of percents.





    Km 60.0 - Côte des Demoiselles Coiffées3.9 kilometre-long climb at 5.2% - category 3
    Km 129.5 - Col de Vars (2 109 m)9.3 kilometre-long climb at 7.5% - category 1
    Km 179.5 - Col d'Izoard (2 360 m)14.1 kilometre-long climb at 7.3% - category H





    Stage: 19 - 21 July : Embrun - Salon-de-Provence, 220.00 km, #flat

    Beware not to be gently rocked by the relaxed atmosphere of the villages of Provence, the lavender fields and the olive trees of Lubéron. It'll be the longest stage of the Tour and will start by a hilly portion, tough on the legs. It'll be a final opportunity for escapees to witness glory. Just as long as they manage to stay clear of the hungry pack all the way to the finish line





    Km 26.0 - Col Lebraut4.7 kilometre-long climb at 6% - category 3
    Km 43.0 - Côte de Bréziers2.3 kilometre-long climb at 5.8% - category 3
    Km 177.5 - Col du Pointu5.8 kilometre-long climb at 4.1% - category 3



    Stage: 20 - 22 July : Marseille ITT, 23.00 km, #tt

    For the very first time, Marseille will welcome an individual time-trial. A final opportunity to witness a change in the hierarchy and why not see the Yellow Jersey switch shoulders. Set entirely on urban roads with a passage on the Corniche and by the Vieux-Port (old harbour), the course will be rather flat except for a climb up to the Notre-Dame-de-la-Garde cathedral. The start and finish will take place inside the legendary Vélodrome football stadium





    Stage: 21 - 23 July : Montgeron - Paris, 105.00 km, #flat

    It'll be time for facts and figures. First of all time to check the number of riders who will enter the world of Giants of the road. Time to count the seconds or minutes separating the best on the final podium. But the finish on the Champs-Élysées is also a territory for sprinters. The British and the Germans have reigned there without sharing these last few years. Will they finally meet a worthy enough rival?





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    just some guy

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    Re: Le Tour 2017 Big Preview
    « Reply #6 on: June 21, 2017, 10:20 »


    Great moments in the history of the Tour
    The line between insanity and genius is said to be a fine one, and in early 20thcentury France, anyone envisaging a near-2,500-km-long cycle race across the country would have been widely viewed as unhinged. But that didn’t stop Géo Lefèvre, a journalist with L’Auto magazine at the time, from proceeding with his inspired plan. His editor, Henri Desgrange, was bold enough to believe in the idea and to throw his backing behind the Tour de France. And so it was that, on 1 July 1903, sixty pioneers set out on their bicycles from Montgeron. After six mammoth stages (Nantes - Paris, 471 km!), only 21 “routiers”, led by Maurice Garin, arrived at the end of this first epic.

    Having provoked a mixture of astonishment and admiration, le Tour soon won over the sporting public and the roadside crowds swelled. The French people took to their hearts this unusual event which placed their towns, their countryside and, since 1910, even their mountains, in the spotlight.

    Le Tour has always moved with the times. Like France as a whole, it benefited from the introduction of paid holidays from 1936; it has lived through wars, and then savoured the “trente glorieuses” period of economic prosperity while enjoying the heydays of Coppi, Bobet, Anquetil, Poulidor and it has opened itself up to foreign countries with the onset of globalisation.


    ~pdf Historical guide in French

    The 1903 Tour de France
    The first stage of the first ever Tour de France was a 467 km effort from Paris to Lyon. Maurice Garin - a former chimney sweeper and winner of Paris-Roubaix and Bordeaux-Paris - won the stage after a gruelling 17 hours, 45 minutes and 13 seconds, followed at just 55 seconds by Emile Pagie. The rest of the peloton was much further behind though: number three Léon Georget was already at 34.59. Only 37 out of the 60 starters finished, with the final rider ending over 20 hours down on the first race leader Maurice Garin. The people who had to abandon were allowed to continue on the other days for stage wins, but would be out for the general classification. Pacers were not allowed, and Jean Fischer was punished for employing one.

    In the second stage from Lyon to Marseille, Hippolyte Aucouturier took the stage win in a sprint from Léon Georget. Maurice Garin lost time, but kept the lead with almost 9 minutes on Georget. Aucouturier also won stage 3, the stage in which Garin extended his lead: he now had almost 2 hours on his nearest competitors. Stage 4 saw the first non-French stage winner of the Tour de France: Charles Laeser of Switzerland. Garin confirmed his status as race leader in stage 5, which he won. The sixth and final stage, from Nantes to Paris over 471 km, was also won by Garin: he won the stage and the classification in front of 20.000 supporters in Paris' Parc Des Princes velodrome. He was not given a yellow jersey, but instead a green armbrace to signify his victory. The 21th and final rider finishing all stages ended almost 65 hours down on the race leader, who would go on to buy a gas station with his winnings, 6000 francs.

    The 1904 Tour and beyond
    The 1903 Tour de France was a huge success for L'Auto. The edition for the final stage sold 130.000 copies, and daily sales rose from 25.000 to 65.000. Le Vélo soon went out of business. More importantly though, the Tour de France was born. A 1904 edition was quickly plannen in which the course and rules were the same as the previous year. However, the Tour was so popular that things started going wrong: the second Tour was filled with controversial incidents of cheating, crashes and even riders being beaten up by fans of rivals. Despite four stage wins by Hippolyte Aucouturier, Maurice Garin managed to win the general classification again. However, months after the race all top four riders were disqualified for incidents during the race. The new winner became 19 year old Henri Cornet, who had initially finished almost 3 hours down on Garin. Garin retired from cycling after this, living out the rest of his days at his gas station until he died in 1957.

    Due to all the controversy, Henri Desgranges almost decided the 1904 Tour de France would be the last. However, due to the success of the race and all it had done for the L'Auto newspaper a new edition was planned for 1905 with changed rules. The race now consisted of 11 shorter stages with no nighttime riding, and the overall winner was decided by points rather than by time.
    Furthermore, the first significant mountains were placed on the parcours. Louis Trousselier won the Tour, which continued to capture the collective imagination of France.

    In the years that followed, the points classification remained in place. The mountain stages were also a success and were further expanded upon in following years: The Massif Central was climbed in 1906, the Pyrenees in 1910 and the Alps in 1911. 1909 saw the first non-French winner: Luxembourg rider Francois Faber. By that time, the number of stages had grown to 15. The general classification was revised to be competed on time rather than on points in 1913. The Tour de France was now a yearly feature in French and international media, already the biggest cycling event of the world. Even though World War I got in the way for some years, when it was resumed in 1919 it was as big as ever.

    Rules, teams, and classifications
    Desgrange wanted the Tour de France to be the ultimate competition between individuals. Therefore, he forbade riders from pacing each other during stages. In 1925 this was changed: pacing was now allowed as trade teams returned for the first time since WW1. The length of the race was also increased to 18 days. However, most flat stages were now decided by bunch sprints and riders attacked less often as the sport became more professional. In 1927, Desgrange attempted to fix this by making the race into a team competition where 16 out of the 24 stages were essentially team time trials. Nicolas Frantz of the Alcyon–Dunlop team won this competition and the yellow jersey, which by now was also a common feature of the race. The first yellow jerseys were handed out in 1919 and continued in the years afterward. The colour yellow is significant because it is the colour of the L'Auto newspaper.

    The 1930 Tour de France was significant for a few reasons. It was the first year national teams instead of trade teams were allowed. The extra costs this brought for the Tour, as food and support were now no longer provided by the bike brands, were compensated by the first publicity caravan of the Tour. Also, riders were now allowed to receive help in case they had a mechanical. The national teams remained a fixture in the Tour until 1962, when trade teams finally returned. 1967 and 1978 were again ran by national teams, but in 1969 the trade teams were back for good. In the meantime, another significant change to the Tour had happened: the green jersey for the points classification had been introduced in the 1953 Tour, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the race. It was won by Fritz Schär in the 1953 edition. In 1975, the best climber classification that had been only semi-official for years was given its distinctive polka-dots jersey. In the 1960's, doping scandals became prominent. This caused cycling authorities to put limits on stage distances, leading to the current form of the Tour with transfers by car or plane in between some stages. By this time, the Tour had taken its current form.

    Organisers and politics
    Henri Desgranges organised the Tour de France from its inception in 1903 until he was forced to retire in 1936. He later died in 1940 at the age of 75. Jacques Goddet took over, but soon the World War 2 came in the way. During the war, Goddet refused to organise a Tour despite the Germans offering him the option to. When France was liberated though, L'Auto was disbanded for being too close to the Germans. Goddet started a new newspaper: L'Équipe. In 1946, two rival Tours were organised of each five stages. The one by Goddet and L'Équipe proved to be more popular and restarted the Tour de France in its old format in 1947. L'Équipe was soon taken over by Émilion Amaury. Goddet continued to organise the Tour until 1986. After him, a number of others took over: Jean-Pierre Courcol in 1988, Jean-Pierre Carenso in 1989, and Jean-Marie Leblanc from 1990 until Christian Prudhomme replaced him in 2005. Henri Desgranges is still remembered for his role in creating the race though: the yellow jersey often features his initials on the design.

    Since the start in the 1903 edition, 113 years and 102 editions have passed. The Tour has known great highs with great riders such as Fausto Coppi, Eddie Merckx, Jacques Anquetil and Bernard Hinault fighting for the wins. The best sprinters in the world have embraced the green jersey as one of the most prestigious prizes available for them. Climbers and attackers from all countries dream of winning the polka dots. And young talents hope to see their talent confirmed by wearing the white jersey of the young riders' classification. However, the Tour has also known lows, often concerning doping. Perhaps one of the lowest points of the Tour was the recent saga surrounding Lance Armstrong, whose seven consecutive Tour wins were taken away for doping. Now, the Tour is hoping to leave all that behind them and move on towards a new great era of cycling. It is time to decide who will become the next person in that list of great names who have won the Tour de France. Bring on the 104th edition.

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  • just some guy

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    Re: Le Tour 2017 Big Preview
    « Reply #7 on: June 21, 2017, 10:21 »
    #ag2r AG2R La Mondiale :* *fr #astana Astana Pro Team :* *kz
    BARDET Romain *fr ARU Fabio *it
    FRANK Mathias *ch FUGLSANG Jakob *dk
    LATOUR Pierre *fr VALGREN Michael *dk
    VUILLERMOZ Alexis *fr LUTSENKO Alexey *kz
    NAESEN Oliver *be ZEITS Andrey *kz
    DOMONT Axel *fr GRIVKO Andrey *ua
    BAKELANTS Jan *be GRUZDEV Dmitriy *kz
    GAUTIER Cyril *fr CATALDO Dario *it
    GASTAUER Ben *lu KOZHATAYEV Bakhtiyar *kz
    #bahrain Bahrain Merida :* *bh #bmc BMC Racing Team :* *usa
    COLBRELLI Sonny *it PORTE Richie *au
    IZAGIRRE Ion *es VAN AVERMAET Greg *be
    GRMAY Tsgabu *et DE MARCHI Alessandro *it
    BOLE Grega *si CARUSO Damiano *it
    ČINK Ondřej *cz ROCHE Nicolas *ie
    Brajkovič Janez *si KÜNG Stefan *ch
    ARASHIRO Yukiya *jp MOINARD Amaël *fr
    BOŽIČ Borut *si SCHÄR Michael *ch
    MORENO Javier *es WYSS Danilo *ch
    #bora Bora – Hansgrohe :* *de #cannondale Cannondale – Drapac :* *usa
    MAJKA Rafał *pl TALANSKY Andrew *usa
    SAGAN Peter *sk URAN Rigoberto *co
    BODNAR Maciej *pl ROLLAND Pierre *fr
    BUCHMANN Emanuel *de PHINNEY Taylor *usa
    BURGHARDT Marcus *de BETTIOL Alberto *it
    MCCARTHY Jay *au CLARKE Simon *au
    POLJAŃSKI Paweł *pl BEVIN Patrick *nz
    SAGAN Juraj *sk VAN BAARLE Dylan *nl
    SELIG Rüdiger *de BROWN Nathan *usa
    #dimension Dimension Data :* *za #fdj FDJ :* *fr
    BOASSON HAGEN Edvald *no DÉMARE Arnaud *fr
    JANSE VAN RENSBURG Reinardt *za PINOT Thibaut *fr
    VENTER Jaco *za KONOVALOVAS Ignatas *lt
    PAUWELS Serge *be DELAGE Mickaël *fr
    CAVENDISH Mark *uk CIMOLAI Davide *it
    CUMMINGS Steve *uk LE GAC Olivier *fr
    THWAITES Scott *uk VICHOT Arthuer *fr
    EISEL Bernhard *at GUARNIERI Jacopo *it
    RENSHAW Mark *au MOLARD Rudy *fr
    #lotto Lotto Soudal :* *be #movistar Movistar Team :* *es
    GREIPEL André *de VALVERDE Alejandro *es
    BENOOT Tiesj *be QUINTANA Nairo *co
    HANSEN Adam *au ERVITI Imanol *es
    GALLOPIN Tony *fr SÜTTERLIN Jasha *de
    WELLENS Tim *be BETANCUR Carlos *co
    DE GENDT Thomas *be AMADOR Andrey *cr
    BAK Lars *dk HERRADA Jesús *es
    ROELANDTS Jurgen *be CASTROVIEJO Jonathan *es
    SIEBERG Marcel *de BENNATI Daniele *it
    #orica Orica – Scott :* *au #quickstep Quick-Step Floors:* *be
    CHAVES Johan Esteban *co MARTIN Daniel *ie
    YATES Simon *au KITTEL Marcel *de
    KREUZIGER Roman *cz GILBERT Philippe *be
    ALBASINI Michael *ch VERMOTE Julien *be
    DURBRIDGE Luke *au TRENTIN Matteo *it
    HAYMAN Mathew *au STYBAR Zdenek *cz
    HOWSON Damien *au SABATINI Fabio *it
    IMPEY Daryl *za BRAMBILLA Gianluca *it
    KEUKELEIRE Jens *be BAUER Jack *nz
    #katusha Team Katusha – Alpecin :* *de #jumbo Team LottoNL – Jumbo :* *nl
    MARTIN Tony *de ROGLIČ Primož *si
    ZABEL Rick *de GESINK Robert *nl
    KRISTOFF Alexander *no GROENEWEGEN Dylan *nl
    HALLER Marco *at BENNETT George *nz
    HOLLENSTEIN Reto *ch LEEZER Tom *nl
    KIŠERLOVSKI Robert *hr VAN EMDEN Jos *nl
    LAMMERTINK Maurits *nl MARTENS Paul *de
    MACHADO Tiago *pt ROOSEN Timo *nl
    POLITT Nils *de WAGNER Robert *de
    #sky Team Sky :* *uk #sunweb Team Sunweb :* *de
    FROOME Christopher *uk MATTHEWS Michael *au
    KWIATKOWSKI Michał *pl BARGUIL Warren *fr
    KNEES Christian *de SINKELDAM Ramon *nl
    ROWE Luke *uk ARNDT Nikias *de
    NIEVE Mikel *es CURVERS Roy *nl
    HENAO Sergio Luis *co TEN DAM Laurens *nl
    KIRYIENKA Vasil *by TEUNISSEN Mike *nl
    LANDA Mikel *es GESCHKE Simon *de
    THOMAS Geraint *uk TIMMER Albert *nl
    #trek Trek – Segafredo :* *usa #uae UAE Team Emirates :* *ae
    CONTADOR Alberto *es MEINTJES Louis *za
    DEGENKOLB John *de LAENGEN Vegard Stake *no
    PANTANO Jarlinson *co ULISSI Diego *it
    MOLLEMA Bauke *nl SWIFT Ben *uk
    GOGL Michael *at ATAPUMA John Darwin *co
    IRIZAR Markel *es BONO Matteo *it
    FELLINE Fabio *it ĐURASEK Kristijan *hr
    ZUBELDIA Haimar *es MORI Manuele *it
    DE KORT Koen *nl MARCATO Marco *it
    #cofidis Cofidis Solutions Crédits :* *fr #direct Direct Energie :* *fr
    BOUHANNI Nacer *fr VOECKLER Thomas *fr
    EDET Nicolas *fr CHAVANEL Sylvain *fr
    NAVARRO Daniel *es CALMEJANE Lilian *fr
    MATÉ Luis Ángel *es PETIT Adrien *fr
    CLAEYS Dimitri *be SICARD Romain *fr
    LAPORTE Christophe *fr QUEMENEUR Perrig *fr
    LEMOINE Cyril *fr TULIK Angelo *fr
    SIMON Julien *fr BOUDAT Thomas *fr
    SÉNÉCHAL Florian *fr GÈNE Yohann *fr
    #fortuneo Fortuneo – Oscaro :* *fr #wanty Wanty - Groupe Gobert :* *be
    SEPÚLVEDA Eduardo *ar MARTIN Guillaume *fr
    BOUET Maxime *fr OFFREDO Yoann *fr
    FEILLU Brice *fr VAN KEIRSBULCK Guillaume *be
    HARDY Romain *fr BACKAERT Frederik *be
    VACHON Florian *fr DEGAND Thomas *be
    MCLAY Daniel *fr MINNAARD Marco *nl
    PÉRICHON Pierre-Luc *fr VANSPEYBROUCK Pieter *be
    GESBERT Élie *fr PASQUALON Andrea *it
    PICHON Laurent *fr SMITH Dion *nz

    :* = Confirmed team
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  • « Last Edit: June 28, 2017, 09:52 by just some guy »

    just some guy

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    Re: Le Tour 2017 Big Preview
    « Reply #8 on: June 21, 2017, 10:25 »
    AG and Search have had a detailed look at the Jersey Contenders (#yellow, #vert #kom #white ), the Rules/points here have a read make comment and vote in the Poll who will win the #yellow
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