t-72

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Stage 9: Arras Citadelle - Roubaix (156,5 km)
« on: June 25, 2018, 20:13 »
As the northern summer rolls on, more and more families are faced with the question: «What are we going to do today?» And the answer, most likely, «It all comes down to the weather». If it is sunny? «We’ll go to the beach and then maybe watch a football match in the evening». If it is overcast? «We’ll go into town and visit the museum or the zoo and then maybe watch a tennis match afterwards». If it is pouring down? «Let’s stay inside and watch the whole Tour de France stage start to finish. It is going to be carnage like 2014».



The first week of the tour de France is, of course, 9 race days long! It comes with 2 quite designated GC days, the team time trial on the first Sunday, and this stage to Roubaix. What makes a stage like this special, is watching how the «ordinary» GC riders can cope with the cobbles.  “Ordinary” is of course a bit of an illusion, but they are considered amateurs in this context, even if they are not that bad, actually. It tells more about how good Sagan, van Avermaet et al are in comparison, and nothing at all about how bad ordinary cyclists are.  «Bambi on ice» comparisons that I will  award to some of the pure climbers are a bit exaggerated, and cobbles in the Tour de France doesn’t always split the GC field in a decisive way, but chances are: someone is going to crack and it won’t look elegant, as when #fdj Thibaut Pinot was going mental by the roadside in 2015.


What is less likely, but could happen, is that one or a few of the GC contenders could get a major gap on the competition, like #astana Nibali did in 2014. In one stage, #sky Froome was eliminated and #tinkoff Contador --- see «Bambi on ice»  ---- was 3 minutes behind.  Half of the gap to the eventual runner up - #ag2r JC Peraud – was established on this stage. 

The main difference between this legendary 2014 stage and the almost forgotten 2015 stage, was the weather.  The takeaway was: When it is dry, cobbled stages aren’t necessarily that decisive. What can hold against the stage fizzling out in a reduced bunch sprint this time, is the parcours: according to #bahrain Vincenzo Nibali, this is a harder cobbles stage than both 2014 and 2015. Let’s take a look on what’s on the menu:


From the start in Arras, the course heads about 40 km eastwards to Cambrai, and then turns north. From Cambrai the course is parallell to the Paris-Roubaix, but about 10 km further to the southwest, see 3D view for an explanation. This years TDF is in  yellow line, the red-orange-brown are the 3 previous versions of the Paris-Roubaix.  The first cobbled section, d’Escaudæuvres à Thun (1500m) appears 47.5 km from the start, just out of Cambrai.


Unlike the 2014 and 2015 stages, that followed the Paris-Roubaix course in the opposite direction, to finish at Arenberg (2014) and Cambrai (2015), this stage goes down cobbleland from the inland towards the coast, the same way as Paris-Roubaix, and therefore it could follow a well known progression of cobbled obstacles all the way to the velodrome.

Except it does, but not for the first part, and later only with exceptions.  The early cobbled sectors here are rare guests on the Paris-Roubaix course.  The most famous and fearsome sector , the Mons-en-Pevele,  rated  5 stars and 3000 meters long in the Paris-Roubaix, has been neutered - this race will only do the “easy” first part, 900 m long. With such “facilitation,” can this still be a parcourse to wreak havoc among the GC contenders?

Sectors 14-12 (2nd - 4th  cobbled sector out of Cambrai) are quite well spaced with about 15 km between each, which could give those that are behind after the cobbles some time to catch up. The real action will problably start when the riders reach sector 12 Wairlang-Brillon, and 1 km after that, when they face sector 11,  Tilloy – Sars et Rosières, for a total of 4400m of cobbles with 1 km “ordinary road”  in between.  From there and in, one cobbled sector follows the other with a maximum gap of 7.2 kilometers.

In 2015, there were 7 cobbled sectors for a total of 13,3 km of cobbles. (It finished into Cambrai but followed a very different route). In 2014, the route was more similar to this years' parcours (disregarding the direction, of course…), and featured 9 cobbled sectors for a total length of 15.4 km of cobbles. This year, the numbers are 15 cobbled sectors and total cobbles length of 21,6 km (!!!!!)
The hardest sectors that are rated this year were rated 4 out of 5 possible stars for the Paris-Roubaix this spring. (Only the Trouée d’Arenberg,- Mons-en-Pévèle and the Carrefour de l’arbre get 5). 
In other words: It is a true cobbles stage, a scaled-down version of the Paris-Roubaix, if you like. That’s a lot of cobbles for a tour de France stage.

There is no doubt, this stage can absolutely be decisive for the GC this year. Time gaps in excess of 2 minutes between various GC riders after this stage will not be a surprise, and 4 – 5 minutes can happen. The weather will play a role, as well as the strategy of the various squads, especially the ones with the strongest cobbles riders in the GC. It depends  if they ride agressively, to win, or conservatively, to not loose to much.

Table of cobbled sectors:
numberdistance remainingnamelengthPR rating
15109,0 kmd’Escaudæuvres à Thun1 500 m
14103,0 kmd’Eswars à Paillencourt1 600 m
1387,5 kmd’Auberchicourt à Ècaillon900 m
1270,0 kmde Wairlang à Brillon2 000 m***
1167,0 kmde Tilloy à Sars-et-Rosières2 400 m****
1060,5 kmde Beuvry à Orchies1 400 m***
952,0 kmd’Auchy à Bersée2 700 m****
846,5 kmMons-en-Pévèle900 m***
740,5 kmMérignies à Avelin700 m**
637,0 kmPont-Thibault à Ennevelin1 400 m***
530,5 kmTempleuve (Molin de Vertain)500 m**
424,0 kmCysoing à Bourghelles1 300 m***
321,5 kmBourghelles à Wannehain1 100 m***
217,0 kmCamphin-en-Pévèle1 800 m****
18,0 kmde Willems à Hem1 400 m***

The hardest sectors line up from about 70 km to 45 km out, and the closely spaced sectors 12 + 11 of total 4400 m length is very likely to shatter the field if it isn’t broken already. If Nairo Quintana and Dan Martin is in the front group after that, pinch your arm.

The review of the contenders isn’t complete yet, I will post that later in the week. In the meantime, you are welcome to guess :D.
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  • M Gee

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    • The user formerly known as hiero
    . . .

     . . .

    The main difference between this legendary 2014 stage and the almost forgotten 2015 stage, was the weather.  The takeaway was: When it is dry, cobbled stages aren’t necessarily that decisive. What can hold against the stage fizzling out in a reduced bunch sprint this time, is the parcours: according to #bahrain Vincenzo Nibali, this is a harder cobbles stage than both 2014 and 2015.  . . .

    Unfortunately for us, the weather is predicted to be ideal, if perhaps on the warm side as the day wears on. Dry, partly cloudy in the morning . . .

    My guess - this stage goes to QS. Little change on GC except for Quintana. He will suffer a flat, and lose more time, IF he manages to avoid an outright crash and abandon.

    The only possible GC changes, I think, are Dumoulin and Thomas. They might be able to play this to gain time. However, the list of riders who COULD use these stages to gain time is quite long, and AFAIC, this stage is very unpredictable.

    This very pretty chart brought to you by T-72. Men in Black have an opportunity on this day.
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  • « Last Edit: July 10, 2018, 01:03 by M Gee »
    . . .He had the bit between his teeth, and he loiked the taste, mate . . .

    M Gee

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    Just went back and watched Cosmo Catalano's recap of Nibali's Tour - 2014, stage 5. You know something? Nibali is a lot better than he often gets credit for. He really did an amazing job that day - and he has validated those results in Classics races since that day. I think we can count on him to make some moves this day.
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  • M Gee

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    And this: post-race coverage including a Fabian Canc interview. This media analysis: highlights how many of the players we are looking at today were there on that day.

    Jakob Fuglsang - was Nibali's #1 lieutenant.
    Geraint Thomas was riding in support of Froome, as was Porte. When Froome abandoned, Porte became the leader. TJ was there. So, ya, I found watching this, 4 years later, interesting and possibly timely.

    And, like my previous post, this validates my current view that Nibali, and Fuglsang, shone on that day. Back when it happened, I was thinking it was more luck than skill. Today I don't think so.
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  • t-72

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    OK, with 7 stages down, let's start pondering how this is going to be played.

    The bad news is that the next two days will continue sunny and dry in the Nord.  The cobbles will not be as decisive as we have hoped for, based on the 2015 experience. The uncertainty is if the extra length of cobbles this time will shatter the group of GC captains anyway.

    Lets consider the GC situation, and how that has evolved:
    In the lead there is a mix of classics riders that won't feature in the final GC (van Avermaet, Alaphilippe, Gilbert) and then some some questionmarks
    #sky Geraint Thomas is riding strong in the first week as expected. Will he take the guide position on offer in front of #sky Chris Froome for Sunday's stage, ie cede his leadership to the team's assumed captain, thereby giving up one of his best chances to extend the lead on the other GC candidates?
    #bmc Teejay can Garderen finally? is quietly racing his best first week ever afaik, in third place now, 8 seconds down. Just watched the interview with him after the 2014 stage, he doesn't like riding cobbles, and I don't think he has the same offensive firepower as Thomas may have in this stage.

    #quickstep Bob Jungels is in a casse patate, GC wise, although TJ is definetly within reach for him come Sunday.

    The main group of GC contenders have about 1 minute to catch up with van Avermaet/Thomas/TJ. There are several riders that may lack the ultimate oomph for the high mountain stages that will be looking to gain some time relative to the pure climbers on this cobbled stage, and then there's a group of guys that we can expect to hold on for dear life, trying to minimize the losses:
    #uae Daniel Martin (now a very uncertain pick after falling stage 8).
    #movistar Nairo Quintana
    #bmc Richie Porte
    #jumbo Steven Kruijswijk

    The rest I am less certain about. I think the 2 most interesting questions now are
    1. What will BMC do?
    2. What will SKy do?

    BMC must deal with the triple oppportunities  of defending yellow for van Avermaet, getting a stage win with GvA and defending Richie Porte's position for the GC. Porte may require a good cobbles rider like van Avermaet to keep him in the firest group, but that rider is hardly TJ van Garderen. Stefan Küng has some experience on the cobbles, he has finished bot the PAris-Roubaix and de Ronde van Vlaanderen multiple times without great results (but his team captain won, you might remember that? )
    However, no - it is either Porte gets van Avermaets support this sunday, or he is basically riding on his own. With a disintegrating team problem, I think Porte is on his own and will loose time whereas van Avermaet will try everything to win the stage and that way also defend yellow.

    #sky Sky is a different team, they are not desintegrating, they are well organized and one of their GC riders is just a few seconds behind van Avermaet. A question on everyone's mind (including mine) is: will #sky let Thomas ride all that he is good for or will he be charged with babysitting Froome?
    I have landed on a yes to that question: tomorrow we will see Geraint Thomas going for yellow without too much concern for Froome, and the team will be happy with that. The thing is, their team has very different rider types from #bmc.

    Thomas isn't the cobbles specialist and Froome isn't the climber that will struggle on the cobbles.  The big difference from #bmc is with the domestiques: Sky has a squad for a Paris-Roubaix win here and Thomas isn't even the best rider on the cobbles.  They have Luke Rowe, Moscon and Kwiatkowski in addition to Thomas: that's half a squad at top 10 level in Paris-Roubaix. This means that even if Thomas attacks tomorrow, Froome will most likely have plenty of support while marking some of the other favorites out of the race.


    Stage win:
    ** #green #bora Peter Sagan, #yellow #bmc Greg van Avermaet
    *   #quickstep Yves Lampaert, #didata Edvald Boasson Hagen

    GC riders to take a lot of time on their opponents:
    ***  #sky Thomas,
    **  #movistar Valverde, #bahrain Nibali
    *   #astana Fuglsang, #sunweb Dumoulin, #ag2r Bardet
       
    PS it appears there are some updated difficulty rating on the cobbles section, I will check later tonight and update if necessary,.
     

     
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  • Mellow Velo

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    The turn into the first section looks................interesting.

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  • "Science is a tool for cheaters". An anonymous French PE teacher.

    t-72

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    The turn into the first section looks................interesting.



    There are many bends that are sharper than that out there, waiting, tomorrow. While compiling material for the top post I "drove" through the whole route on google streetview (exception for some sections that didn't have streetview images). I noticed some 90 degree turns with bad exits (sloping very much outwards, mud on the outside of the exit, water etc)

    Although this will not be Paris-Roubaix there are still a few tricky points that can cause great damage.

    Weather to remain dry and not windy for tomorrow, cobbles are dry - expect a dusty race.
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  • t-72

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    Here are the updated cobbles ratings, on a map, ASO has picked up that hint somewhere  :shh

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  • t-72

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    ... and as a profile.  This stage is pancake flat but listed as "hilly" probably to score less points for green jersey. (Flat stages have more green jersey points). That makes it even more of a GC stage.

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  • t-72

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    and finally, the table presented with distance-left-to-go (in theory corresponding to the distance in the upper left corner of the TV screen) instead of distance from start, with the updated ratings. Changes: all the early sectors not used in P-R lately are assigned **. Mons-en-Pévèle (the short and clean version) now at ** only.

    numberdistance remainingnamelengthTDF rating
    15109,0 kmEscaudæuvres - Thun1 500 m**
    14103,0 kmEswars- Paillencourt1 600 m**
    1387,5 kmAuberchicourt - Ècaillon900 m**
    1270,0 kmWairlang - Brillon2 000 m***
    1167,0 kmTilloy - Sars-et-Rosières2 400 m****
    1060,5 kmBeuvry - Orchies1 400 m***
    952,0 kmAuchy - Bersée2 700 m****
    846,5 kmMons-en-Pévèle900 m**
    740,5 kmMérignies - Avelin700 m**
    637,0 kmPont-Thibault - Ennevelin1 400 m***
    530,5 kmTempleuve (Molin de Vertain)500 m**
    424,0 kmCysoing - Bourghelles1 300 m***
    321,5 kmBourghelles - Wannehain1 100 m***
    217,0 kmCamphin-en-Pévèle1 800 m****
    18,0 kmWillems - Hem1 400 m***
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  • t-72

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    Sharp turn with difficult exit, sector 3 Bourghelles-Wannehain

    when approaching:


    the exit is even narrower, and that cannot be seen from the approach:
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  • Armchair Cyclist

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    and finally, the table presented with distance-left-to-go (in theory corresponding to the distance in the upper left corner of the TV screen) instead of distance from start, with the updated ratings. Changes: all the early sectors not used in P-R lately are assigned **. Mons-en-Pévèle (the short and clean version) now at ** only.


    Brilliant job: every viewer needs that visible while they watch the stage.
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  • t-72

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    Danish TV2 reporter Sanne Jakobsen has been out on a recon, and these images show a spot with much broken up cobbles to be avoided. I am not 100% sure but I think it is in the continuation of the exit of the exact same curve I pointed to above. A real crux section from a technical point of view. It is short compared to the 3 usual 5-star sections of the Paris-Roubaix but this is no better stonework than at the Carrefour de l'Arbre, Mons-en-Pévèle and Arenberg (the difference is those sections are like this for kms).

    https://twitter.com/JakobsenSanne/status/1018398013755150336
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  • t-72

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    OK, to wrap up the stage:
    1. The nice weather and dry cobbles made this stage almost a 2015 re-run, with not many big differences between GC riders.
    2. I was wrong - no offensive riding from Geraint Thomas. #sky mostly just made it across the cobbles without serious damage except for Bernal making his white jersey a tougher one to take. (This despite some famous airtime for Froome on a lawn somewhere..)
    3. Big looser of the day clearly #bmc Richie Porte, after a fall (involving a pedestrian or a fan?) before the start of the cobbles.
    4. Second big loser of the day, #bmc Teejay van Garderen was probably the team's captain for about 25 minutes before crashing out and needing repairs loosing lots of time.
    5. Third big loser of the day, #bmc chief Ochowitz tells Porte to go to Annecy and get his bag there. Nice man.
    6. Even more #bmc, and it's the only winner: van Avermaet gets one more day in yellow and then I guess it is over. He has had it with 7 minutes or so gap before, after a breakaway win, and  he is not going to keep it, not this time either.
    7. SKy is a loser, they failed to put Movistar under pressure.
    8. Movistar is a winner. Their worst stages: TTT and cobbles stage. Now  done with that and on par with Froome for Valverde and Landa, NAiro 1 minute behind.
    9. Uran was the only GC rider to loose lots today
    10. Did I say impressive performance by #ag2r Bardet and #uae Dan Martin? Lots of misfortune, but still hanging on!

    For the stage win, I was wrong too. I had Lampaert and van Avermaet on the list, but not Degenkolb. Great win by the man who said, after winning his first race after being mowed down by a british lady driving on the wrong side of the road in Spain, a stage win in the Arctic Race: "winning now feels like winning a monument"

    Congratulations, #trek John Degenkolb, for an excellent race and an exceptional comeback! You are a monumental bike racer!

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  • Mellow Velo

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    2 minutes of thrills and spills.


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  • t-72

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    The superguppy #ag2r Alexis Vuillermoz has broken *something* in his hand because of a spectator that wanted to shoot a better picture. Finished today's stage (9th...the cobbles stage to Roubaix)  with one hand on the handlebars only.

    It seems quite likely he'll be forced to abandon, but he is in Annecy.  This will be a big loss for Ag2R because Vuillermoz was everywhere doing everything today, clearly in top shape, and they already lost Domont. This leaves the young guy who always seem to struggle a lot even when he is actually doing fine, Mathias Frank and  Tony Gallopin as the only mountain domestiques in that squad, which arrived strong, better prepared than ever. 

    *something* = omoplate


    https://twitter.com/A_Vuillermoz/status/1018549645671325696
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  • Drummer Boy

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    2 minutes of thrills and spills.

    Very dramatic footage. I must say, the use of on-bike cameras has really been one of the more significant contributions for fan engagement. I remember the first few times I saw such footage and was just amazed. There was really nothing even close to this in years past that could give you an idea of what these guys are experiencing in the thick of things. I'm also impressed by just how many key crashes happen to be captured on camera. It's fascinating. Terrifying, but fascinating nonetheless.
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Speaking of crashes...

    Hincapie had some interesting observations on Sky's tactics. He said that he felt that when they were on the front, they were going into the opening turns of the cobbled sections way too hot. He didn't understand it, and felt they were taking too big a risk. He said that a gentle working of the brakes would've made it safer for them, and more difficult for the riders behind, as it would've backed them up a bit.
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  • Drummer Boy

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    M Gee

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    The superguppy #ag2r Alexis Vuillermoz has broken *something* in his hand . . .

    *something* = omoplate


    In his hand? omoplate is the scapula - shoulder blade, yes?


    ...

    Hincapie had some interesting observations on Sky's tactics. He said that he felt that when they were on the front, they were going into the opening turns of the cobbled sections way too hot. He didn't understand it, and felt they were taking too big a risk. He said that a gentle working of the brakes would've made it safer for them, and more difficult for the riders behind, as it would've backed them up a bit.

    Exactly right. I posted a link to that podcast in the rest day recap, as I think the analysis is the best I've heard from the journos and whatnot, at least so far.

    Here's the link again, JIC.

    BTW - if they were coming in too hot, I have to think that maybe race nerves were STILL playing a big part in the action. Too many cobble newbs in the peloton - the experienced wouldn't have been able to control all that, and possibly suffering from nerves just by association. That would also go a long way towards explaining why the day had so many crashes.
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  • t-72

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    In his hand? omoplate is the scapula - shoulder blade, yes

    I don’t have a Latin vocabulary, not for spare parts for bodies nor for species. I struggle with biology because all English speakers think everyone learns these names in school, as it is not really English and they had to learn it too. I wish a shoulder blade was just a shoulder blade!

    And don’t get me started on French! I am even worse   :lol

    Oh well, I stand humbly, corrected! :)
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  • Leadbelly

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    Yesterday was a 100 times more interesting a normal flat stage, but I can understand why some of the GC guys aren't so keen on having stages like this.

    The vast majority of the action was the battle for people to get back to the front after crashes and mechs (which happened a lot more than a normal flat stage). Now the first of those can be somewhat lessened by bike handling skills and good positioning in the pack, but not all of them and obviously the second one you can do nothing about. It just leaves the racing feeling a bit like a random lottery (Bardet kept on getting snake eyes!).
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  • Capt_Cavman

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    #   Rider Name (Country) Team   Result
    1   Quick-Step Floors   10:13:56   
    2   Trek-Segafredo   0:00:08   
    3   Movistar Team   0:00:50   
    4   Bora-Hansgrohe       
    5   LottoNl-Jumbo   0:00:54   
    6   Mitchelton-Scott       
    7   Team Sunweb   0:00:58   
    8   Direct Energie   0:01:03   
    9   Dimension Data       
    10   Lotto Soudal   0:01:05   
    11   Katusha-Alpecin   0:01:18   
    12   UAE Team Emirates   0:01:28   
    13   Bahrain-Merida   0:02:11   
    14   AG2R La Mondiale   0:02:39   
    15   Fortuneo-Samsic   0:03:39   
    16   Astana Pro Team   0:04:31   
    17   EF Education First-Drapac p/b Cannondale   0:05:07   
    18   BMC Racing Team   0:06:28   
    19   Wanty-Groupe Gobert   0:11:23   
    20   Groupama-FDJ   0:12:25   
    21   Team Sky   0:12:40   
    22   Cofidis, Solutions Credits   0:23:23   


    Haven't got time to format the stage team result above but look who's in 21st place. Sky may have had hundreds of dayglo shirted helpers waving wheels along the route but their tactics meant that they ended up in a position whereby any incident to either Thomas or Froome in the final stages would have meant the end of Thomas's challenge.

    It was almost as if they thought they could use the same tactics as on a mountain stage, apply steady pressure on the front until the rival leaders lose their support and then use their numerical advantage to dictate the final stages. All they did was detonate their own team and nullify any advantage of having the mountain climber with the best record on the cobbles.
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  • M Gee

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    . . . Sky may have had hundreds of dayglo shirted helpers waving wheels along the route but their tactics meant that they ended up in a position whereby any incident to either Thomas or Froome in the final stages would have meant the end of Thomas's challenge.

    It was almost as if they thought they could use the same tactics as on a mountain stage, apply steady pressure on the front until the rival leaders lose their support and then use their numerical advantage to dictate the final stages. All they did was detonate their own team and nullify any advantage of having the mountain climber with the best record on the cobbles.

    You know, that is a thought! If they were instructed to tactically keep the pressure on, it could explain why they were going into cobble sectors too hot.

    BTW - I think it was said that Sky had 40 staff positioned along the route, AND that they had studied where, historically, most crashes occurred. As opposed to Movistar, who had something like 13 staff along the route for relief!
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  • M Gee

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    • The user formerly known as hiero
    I've got a question for all of you. I just played through the ES coverage of stage 9, watching Porte's crash. Porte does not look to be in that much pain. Maybe the cameraman was simply unlucky and didn't get the good shots - but I have to wonder - how many reasons would Porte have to NOT finish the Tour? Why would he want to NOT finish? Do you even think that is possible?

    Could his fear of stage 9 be that bad? Could his overall outlook be that negative he just didn't want to continue?

    I am pre-inclined to NOT like Ochowicz. He's been associated with mean and dishonest behavior in the past. But could he be right this time in calling Porte out on Twitter?

    Weirdness abounds in the back-stories.
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  • rote_laterne

    • Neo Pro
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    I've seen the scene only once, to me it looked like pain. He was quite good in 2014, had a good form this year so I don't think he would abandon for fun. His time for a podium at the Tour is running out and  #trek right now doesn't look like a better team than  #bmc to achieve this.
    And  #bmc dealt with Tejay Van Garderen mental weakness for years, so I don't get Ochowicz' behavior.
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  • AG

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    he looked to be in a fair amount of pain to me.

    it is confirmed that he broke his collarbone - which he said he knew as soon as he hit the road.

    hard ... but thats racing.


    What caused it?  was it a spectator
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  • M Gee

    • Road Captain
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    • The user formerly known as hiero
    . . .
    What caused it?  was it a spectator

    The ES coverage didn't show enough to tell, but I heard somebody say that it was a spectator.
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  • LukasCPH

    • World Champion
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      • lukascph.media
    • Awards: Staff of the year 2016Staff of the year 2015Velorooms Tour de France BINGO champion 2014National Championships Predictions Game Winner 2014Velorooms Monday Quiz ChampionPoster of the Year 2013
    Congratulations, #trek John Degenkolb, for an excellent race and an exceptional comeback! You are a monumental bike racer!
    Two monuments in 2015.
    Horrid, possibly career-ending crash in 2016.
    So-so 2017 season.
    Decent, but not great 2018 spring campaign.
    Comeback on the very biggest stage there can possibly be, Roubaix stage of the Tour.
    :pray

    He was a great bike racer before, he is a legend now.
    I haven't seen the stage yet, and I've forbidden my dad to tell me anything about it (which he, reluctantly and with frequent reminders, adheres to). All I know is that Degenkolb won.

    Will watch a recording of it, and the post-stage interviews, these days. :)
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  • Cyclingnews Women's WorldTour Correspondent
    2017 0711|CYCLING PR Manager; 2016 Stölting Content Editor
    Views presented are my own. RIP Keith & Sean

     



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