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Echoes

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Re: Cycling Farmers
« Reply #30 on: February 21, 2019, 22:03 »
http://www.ciclismointernacional.com/corredores-a-seguir-en-2016-ii-miguel-angel-lopez/



My Spanish is broken but Miguel Angel Gomez Moreno has impressive strength that he inherited from his father, Santiago, a peasant who doesn't just work the land but also cuts down trees. (comments by Rafael Acevedo, his coach in 2015)

His French wikipedia page says that he comes from an underprivileged farming family.

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  • "Paris-Roubaix is the biggest cycling race in the world, bigger than the Tour de France, bigger than any other bike race" (Sir Bradley Wiggins)

    Echoes

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    Re: Cycling Farmers
    « Reply #31 on: March 31, 2019, 16:38 »
    David Menut is a rider coming from an agrarian milieu.  :)

    http://creuse-agricole.com/actualites/cyclistes-et-issus-du-monde-agricole-route-vtt-et-cyclocross:PFPRAJ5Y.html

    This is an article from 15 July 2009 on "Creuse agricole et rurale", so 10 years ago when he was just a 17-year-old junior rider.

    Headline says: Cyclist Coming from the Agricultural World

    David Menut, the son of a farmer based in Saint-Christophe, has a very busy life between road cycling, mountainbike, cyclocross and studies.

    His mother, Pauline, says that he often misses school classes, for example on Friday when he has to leave for a race or on Monday morning when he had to come back late from a race on Sunday.

    He was to finish secondary school one year after that article was published and practiced the three cycling disciplines mentioned in the headline. So he was worn out. That winter he took part in all the cyclocross Coupe de France events, World Cup events and French nats (he was 29th). He was then building up for the MTB nats (a couple of days after the article).

    The "Creuse" département is in the Limousin region, Saint-Christophe is a bit South of Guéret and North East of Limoges with a distance.

    Mountainbike and cyclocross were his first passions but he was more and more tempted by road cycling. There are more financial means on the road, races are huge and there are more opponents and more teams. He actually raced a few years on the road with BigMat Auber and Armée de terre but when Armée de terre stopped, David was an amateur again with his original club "Creuse Oxygène Guéret", which is best known as a mountainbike club (Belgium's Jens Schuermans is currently racing for them) and which was founded by his uncle Alain Menut. So last winter David had to bounce back in cyclocross and was 3rd at the Cyclocross Coupe de France.

    His uncle initiated him to cycling at age 5 when taking him for rides on Saturdays. Back at the time of the article David is the one to mentor kids who start riding.

    His parents are not cycling passionates but are supporting him. His father Jean-Claude is raising "Limousine" cows in Saint-Christophe. His mother is a "nursing assistant" (I think that would be the correct term or "nursing auxiliary"). She loved seeing him do some bike trials but he didn't like it.  :lol

    David also used to help his father at the farm but already then in 2009 it was harder. During those 2009 summer holidays he had to cycle and couldn't help him.

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  • Echoes

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    Re: Cycling Farmers
    « Reply #32 on: May 25, 2019, 10:57 »
    I've stumbled on an interview of Marc Madiot, dating from last November. Madiot was present at a press conference in the Aveyron organised by his co-sponsor Groupama. It's an agrarian département in Southern France, hence he would talk about his own affinities with the agrarian world with the frankness that he's known for.  :D


    Quote
    I'm the son of a farmer and I'm proud of it. If I had to go on a demonstration for farmers, I'd do it. Their cause is very dear to me. I'm very committed to it. I know their world. They are hard-working people but neglected by public and political authorities whichever they are. My father was a trade unionist and so am I. So perhaps this part of me is emerging. I shouldn't say that but when I see peasants demonstrating alongside the roads during the Tour of France or blocking the race, I'm smirking. I'm a peasant at heart.

               https://www.centrepresseaveyron.fr/2018/11/15/marc-madiot-je-suis-fils-de-paysan-et-fier-de-letre,4862590.php


    In his book, Madiot found it natural that Hinault didn't have to apologise after punching a demonstrator at the 1984 Paris-Nice. Sadly for that demonstrator, he was not a farmer, he was a worker at the La Ciotat shipyard.  :lol

    Joke aside, I'm still so fond of his interviews.  :)
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Echoes

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    Re: Cycling Farmers
    « Reply #34 on: July 14, 2019, 23:08 »
    Thanks Drummer, it's really an interesting article. Too long to translate but I may share with you the main ideas (in my humble opinion). Was he really in a breakaway lately?

    It starts with a quote by Frederik himself:
    Quote
    Farming and cycling are two radically different worlds

    The Backaert family owns the holding « De Sint-Michaëlshoeve » in Michelbeke, a small village in the entity of Brakel, just before the Berendries.

    Farming in that area is very hard and several farmers received warnings (orange or red cards), meaning that they had to stop with organic fertilisers [which means they have to use chemical fertilisers or what ??? It's absurd!] and there are problems with the erosion of their soils. Their holding is about 800m away from a natural area, as well. It's not a coincidence if there were farmers' demonstrations on the road sides of the spring classics in 2017. The prices are very high for the landowner and the workforce is very expensive. It's getting real hard to compete with Poland or even with France.

    Christian, Frederik's father, is 67 and milks about 80 cows. He's not optimistic for milk farmers in Flanders
    Quote
    Either we work on a knife edge for the global market or else we work for a niche market

    The family chose for the second option. So they had to get away from the easy sales for the industry and opt for the short circuits and direct sales. Of course the products had to be top quality. The farm diversified. It now ranges from raw milk, butter, buttermilk and quite a lot of cheeses: young cheese, semi hard cheese, half old cheese and even cheeses with aromatic herbs (says the mother, Christine). They also sell yogurt, which is crucial . If they can't sell it they are done. The farm is really in the middle of the village, which of course helps.
    Quote
    It's a lot of work but it's worth it

    They have also transformed a former barn into a place to welcomes buses and groups of visitors, like that group who combined visiting their farm and the archeological museum of Velzeke, which not far away. However since the noughties, organised visits are much less frequent than used to be.

    The cheeses are made of raw milk, they don't pasteurise. Food hygiene has to be impeccable.


    I skip to the chapter dedicated to non dairy production: 25-30 hectares of maize/corn, 15-20 hectares of potatoes, 8-9 hectares of beans, 5 hectares of sugar beetroots, 3-4 hectares of bere (6-row barley), 2 hectares of field beet/mangold.

    The prices for potatoes are desastrous this year, which those who opted for free market feel powerfully. The Backaert family has potato hangar with can contain 1,000 tons of potatoes but it's a risky market because you can never predict what the eventual outcome would be.

    Frederik Backaert has raced 108 days in 2017 !!!! This means he didn't have much time to give a hand at the farm. 108 days must really be make him one of the most active in the peloton that year.  :cool

    Frederik has made studies at a school for agriculture in Roeselaere (Roulers is the name in French, which you can see in the article). He could take the farm over from his parents but it's a real hard job. He's considered using a milking robot but using a robot doesn't mean less work.

    For the moment he's fully dedicated to cycling but relativises about it. In cycling you are quickly famous but also quickly forgotten and then he recalls the ill fates of some farmboys like him: Igor Decraene and Stig Broeckx [let's make things clear here though, Stig is, thank God, still alive  :) and Decraene's passing away had nothing to do with cycling practice].
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Re: Cycling Farmers
    « Reply #35 on: July 18, 2019, 13:15 »
    The cheeses are made of raw milk, they don't pasteurise. Food hygiene has to be impeccable.

    That's interesting to me because I only recently learned that some of the cheeses produced and sold in France and some other European countries are not available in the U.S., and I believe the above point is the reason why. While there are a lot of good qualities associated with such cheeses, it seems that they are beyond the reach here.

    I had completely forgotten about this story that I posted earlier in the thread, but I'll revisit it here as it relates to a race story from yesterday.
    Frederik Backaert, the farmer racing the Tour de France

    Quote
    When his rivals were resting, Frederik Backaert was milking cows. The Wanty-Groupe Gobert rider’s unlikely journey from a Flemish farm to cycling’s biggest race

    Quote
    “I don’t see it as work, it’s just two hobbies. It’s good if you can make your hobbies your passion and your passion your work,” Backaert says. “I feel like I’ve never worked a day in my life: not on the bike at least, sometimes in the farm though.”

    Backaert has been accustomed to helping out his parents and uncle since childhood. At the age of 18, he did a three-year college course on biotechnology. “Most cyclists don’t go to higher education. That was a problem too: I had that and the farm. At the time, I was especially busy building extra stables, we did most of it ourselves. So, between the ages of 18 and 21, I didn’t have a lot of time to train. it was mostly in the evening for an hour in the dark, with lights.


    Driven: Frederik behind the wheel



    As a side note:

    Towards the very end of yesterday's TdF Stage 11, there was live shot on NBC from a camera mounted on Frederik Backaert's bike. It's the only time I've seen live footage from an on-bike camera. I imagine the technology is tricky, and the segment didn't last very long, but I wonder if there will be more of that or not?

    I was also surprised that the commentators didn't give it more attention. But this was a tense sprint finish, and I suppose their focus was more on what was happening on the road.
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: Cycling Farmers
    « Reply #36 on: July 18, 2019, 14:06 »
    That's interesting to me because I only recently learned that some of the cheeses produced and sold in France and some other European countries are not available in the U.S., and I believe the above point is the reason why. While there are a lot of good qualities associated with such cheeses, it seems that they are beyond the reach here.
    Raw milk cheese includes many of the famous hard cheeses like Parmigiano, Gruyère, Emmentaler etc. - and soft cheeses like Roquefort, Camembert, Brie etc.

    For hard cheeses it's not so much of a problem since those are heated to >50°C during the manufacturing anyway, the milk is just not pasteurised before.
    Soft cheeses are different, of course; impeccable hygiene is essential. But the difference in taste to a soft cheese from pasteurised milk is substantial.

    Of course, the downside is that raw milk soft cheeses are often relatively local. Last year, I tried Casatella Trevigiana in Italy. Absolutely gorgeous - but impossible to find outside Veneto.
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    Drummer Boy

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    Re: Cycling Farmers
    « Reply #37 on: July 31, 2019, 12:21 »
    I'm not sure that I understand the full context of this, but...

    https://twitter.com/inrng/status/1156314783114760194
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: Cycling Farmers
    « Reply #38 on: July 31, 2019, 15:02 »
    I'm not sure that I understand the full context of this, but...
    If my Flemish doesn't deceive me, Teuns said during the Tour that he wanted to drive a tractor again, preferably of the New England brand.
    So some local farmers put a New England tractor in his driveway for his return home so that he can "finally do his favourite hobby on four wheels after three weeks of deprivation, riding around France on two wheels".
    :D


    I presume the tractor is borrowed, not an actual present - those things are expensive!
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  • M Gee

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    Re: Cycling Farmers
    « Reply #39 on: July 31, 2019, 17:06 »
    That's interesting to me because I only recently learned that some of the cheeses produced and sold in France and some other European countries are not available in the U.S., and I believe the above point is the reason why. While there are a lot of good qualities associated with such cheeses, it seems that they are beyond the reach here.
     . . .

    I would imagine that shipping such cheeses would be immensely costly, with great risk of spoilage and/or flavor/texture change. It's like many lacto-fermented foods - you can't really preserve them, as doing so alters the taste.
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  • . . .He had the bit between his teeth, and he loiked the taste, mate . . .

    LukasCPH

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    Re: Cycling Farmers
    « Reply #40 on: July 31, 2019, 20:16 »
    Teuns tractor thing
    This didn't go well ... :-x
    http://teambahrainmerida.com/dylan-teuns-wont-be-racing-in-san-sebastian/
    Quote
    Dylan Teuns was involved in a minor home accident today. The unfortunate event happened to Team Bahrain Merida rider while gardening with his garden tractor this morning at his house in Halen.
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Re: Cycling Farmers
    « Reply #41 on: July 31, 2019, 23:25 »
    This didn't go well ... :-x

     :o  :S  :(
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Re: Cycling Farmers
    « Reply #42 on: August 01, 2019, 01:03 »
    I would imagine that shipping such cheeses would be immensely costly...

    It's my understand that it's not a matter simply of logistics.
    Those cheeses are just permitted to be shipped to the U.S. (for the reasons you've outlined).
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  • Echoes

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    Re: Cycling Farmers
    « Reply #43 on: August 01, 2019, 09:48 »
    Battered Dylan Teuns - Stupid Accident with the Tractor

    https://sporza.be/nl/2019/08/01/dylan-teuns-huldiging-halen-hechtingen/

    Yesterday, Dylan Teuns came with 15 stitches to the town hall of Halen where he was celebrated for his stage win at the Planche des Belles Filles.

    While working the field, all of a sudden, the tractor refused to work anymore. Thereby Dylan Teuns crashed with his face right into the steering wheel.  :lol

    Sorry about my laughing but since he rather seems OK, I can't refrain. ;)


    Apparently, his presence in San Sebastian is not ruled out yet (according to the short video clip from TV Limburg).

    Dylan got his love for farming from Martin Landuyt, his godfather. The latter had a farm and he would always come and sit in the tractor with him.

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  • PeteFromLeeds

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    Re: Cycling Farmers
    « Reply #44 on: August 01, 2019, 15:04 »
    Ouch. I hope he recovers in time for the Vuelta.
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