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LukasCPH

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Re: Milano - Sanremo
« Reply #30 on: March 25, 2019, 06:45 »
It seems that puncheur teams have figured out that the best way to get rid of the sprinters is to leave it to one massive effort on the Poggio. Unfortunately, smaller team size and the need to preserve troops for this big push, has meant that the Cipressa has become neutralized.
 Essentially, the "finale" has been further distilled to just the last 10kms of the 290km race.
It's true that the winning move doesn't go on the Cipressa anymore. If it ever did.

But, while they weren't attacking, #deceuninck were absolutely drilling it - and with riders like Gilbert and Stybar - up the Cipressa. That took a lot out of the heavy guys, and meant that they and their teams had nothing to respond to the actual attack on the Poggio.

Soft-pedalling the Cipressa, as sometimes happens when there are several attacks that don't get away, means everyone's fresher - and a sprint becomes more likely.
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    LukasCPH

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    Re: Milano - Sanremo
    « Reply #31 on: March 25, 2019, 07:01 »
    It's true that the winning move doesn't go on the Cipressa anymore. If it ever did.

    But, while they weren't attacking, #deceuninck were absolutely drilling it - and with riders like Gilbert and Stybar - up the Cipressa. That took a lot out of the heavy guys, and meant that they and their teams had nothing to respond to the actual attack on the Poggio.

    Soft-pedalling the Cipressa, as sometimes happens when there are several attacks that don't get away, means everyone's fresher - and a sprint becomes more likely.
    Just watched the HTRWW that Drummer Boy linked. I must have misremembered - absolutely no #deceuninck drilling of any sort happened on the Cipressa.
    So what do I know. :S
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  • Mellow Velo

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    Re: Milano - Sanremo
    « Reply #32 on: March 25, 2019, 07:40 »
    Just watched the HTRWW that Drummer Boy linked. I must have misremembered - absolutely no #deceuninck drilling of any sort happened on the Cipressa.
    So what do I know. :S

     Yeah, you did have me wondering whether we had watched the same race. :D
    Just to be clear for everybody: I wasn't suggesting that the winning move used to come on the Cipressa, just that teams used to (as Lukas says) drill it more and we sometimes saw a bit of a late break form over the top. Plus there seemed to be more animation between the climbs.
     
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    M Gee

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    Re: Milano - Sanremo
    « Reply #33 on: March 25, 2019, 20:13 »
    I'll have to go check out Cosmo's take on things! I just got done listening to the CN podcast though . . .and w***ers!  :o :lol They close by saying this was not an iconic MSR! If for nothing else, Bonifazio's descent was absolutely one of the finest ever filmed. And watching the Wolf pack work as a magnificent team of class elite riders - yup, that too.

    I'm pretty sure there was a lot more pressure on the Cipressa than some of you recognize. And with Bonifazio screaming down that hill - they couldn't just coast to the Poggio, eh? Sagan was off his best this day. He got stuck out front, and then watched the wrong wheel. Alaphillipe had that little extra from his team - and closed the deal.

    All that, and a beautiful spring day!.  :snooty
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    M Gee

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    • The user formerly known as hiero
    Re: Milano - Sanremo
    « Reply #34 on: March 25, 2019, 20:28 »
    Just watched the HTRWW that Drummer Boy linked. I must have misremembered - absolutely no #deceuninck drilling of any sort happened on the Cipressa.
    So what do I know. :S
    Nope, no drilling - until Craddock upped the pace a couple km off the top. That put a lot of fatigue in the legs behind him, and the big guns were trailing off the back - out of position and essentially day done. Bonifazio was supposed to save it for the Poggio - but went early because he knew he couldn't hold it together up the Poggio.

    I don't think it's normally so much about the winning move as it is setting things up for the winning move. After all those km, there is still something left in the legs - and then the Cipressa saps it.
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  • Echoes

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    Re: Milano - Sanremo
    « Reply #35 on: March 25, 2019, 21:01 »
    The last winning move on the Cipressa was 1996, Gabriele Colombo, albeit not solo. A different era however.

    Let's not forget one factor, the Cipressa descent! Search mentioned it in the OP. It often happened that the Cipressa descent makes more damage than the ascent. It's a technical but more importantly in my opinion, it's facing the Med, so with side wind. We've often top favourite trying something there and a break in the peloton down on the Via Aurelia. This year, no disrespect to Bonifazio but he wasn't a top favourite, I guess. However his move did create a break in the peloton, which made the race harder for the weaker riders.

    This being said, I've often seen in the noughties editions when nothing happened on the Cipressa and still a bunch sprint as outcome. I guess it's quite counter-logical to save all energy for the Poggio. The harder the race the better for the best riders. So for sure the best strategy should be exhaust sprinters on the Cipressa, so that the punchers may get rid of them on the Poggio. Perhaps setting a super fast tempo without any attacks is enough exhaust them?
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    M Gee

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    Re: Milano - Sanremo
    « Reply #36 on: March 25, 2019, 23:44 »
    . . . Perhaps setting a super fast tempo without any attacks is enough exhaust them?
    That's the idea. After SO many km, the legs feel fine, but as soon as they get tapped a little? Ooopsie. Like Groenewegen, or Bouhanni this year. Dangling off the back on the Cipressa - and even more so when Craddock upped the pace.

    Actually, at first, I see how people are saying there wasn't any pace up the Cipressa. For most of it, everybody seemed content to make a modest effort. It was still enough that some were on the back of a long peloton. Craddock kicked the pace, and there was very nearly a popping sound at the back! Then they have to kick again on the descent and the flat to catch back up - more energy.

    Alaphillipe mentioned this very thing in noting how well he was protected, at the front in the descent off the Cipressa - he didn't have to expend any effort to catch up to anyone coming out of the corners.

    Just that little edge . . .!
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  • Echoes

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    Re: Milano - Sanremo
    « Reply #37 on: March 31, 2019, 15:59 »
    I do always like to see the teams that do the work get the win ...

    You didn't like it today then. :lol
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  • AG

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    Re: Milano - Sanremo
    « Reply #38 on: April 01, 2019, 08:00 »
    :lol  -   its also good to see someone other than Quickstep win for a change  :D
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