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M Gee

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Stage 20: FELTRE-->CROCE D'AUNE-MONTE AVENA
« on: May 29, 2019, 20:17 »
It just SOUNDS exciting! Croce D'Aune! This day WILL see action. The only question will be who can make it stick! If Yates is going to attempt a long-range attack, today will be the day, but the competition, I think, will not let that happen. Nibali has a strong enough team - and he has the experience. I expect either Movistar or Nibali to take advantage of this day. Nibali may even be able to play Carapaz against Landa - we saw some cracks in the teamwork on stage 17.

Route description from the La Gazzetta dello Sport official site.
Quote
A colossal stage through the Dolomites, with 5 long consecutive climbs alternating with milder or flat stretches. Setting off in Feltre, the stage encounters the first ascents in Arsiè. After cresting the Cima Campo climb (18 km), the route descends all the way to Castel Tesino and Scurelle. Next on the route, the ascent to Passo Manghen amounts to 24 km (including both the false flat and the actual climb), with nearly 2,000 m in vertical altitude gain. A fast-running descent leads through Molina di Fiemme, Cavalese, Tesero and Predazzo, all the way to Passo Rolle. The climb, although not forbidding, is over 20 km long, and precedes the final ascent to Croce d’Aune-Monte Avena. The final part, composed of two consecutive climbs, amounts to nearly 20 km. Over the last 6 km of the Croce d’Aune climb, gradients never drop below 10%, and even top out at 16%. The route descends briefly after Croce d’Aune, and then bounces back to sharp uphill gradients over the last 7 km. Final kilometres The final 7 km are entirely uphill, with an average 7.4% gradient, peaking at 10%. The route goes up in long hairpins, up to 150 m from the finish. Here it takes a sharp turn to the left and enters the flat home stretch, on 5 m wide tarmac.




Not time for action just yet - they'll be together over climb 1.



Ah, but climb #2? Maybe. It's early, with over 100 km left, but take a look.


#3 is straightforward.


Last section is a two-parter. Climb 4, followed by a descent, and then the finale. This is also an opportunity for an attack, but it won't likely be for a lot of time.




Bahrain-Merida is looking stronger as a team than any team I recall seeing around Nibali in some years. Movistar has the heavyweight punching power this year, though. Ineos have been notable by their absence this time. Astana have been flexing their muscle this year. There is enough team strength I don't think a long range attack will be possible, but it would be exciting to watch if it happens! Definitely anticipate attacks on the slopes leading to Croce D'Aune.
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  • . . .He had the bit between his teeth, and he loiked the taste, mate . . .

    Drummer Boy

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    It would appear to be the perfect stage, at the perfect time, for Carapaz to own this edition of the Giro.

    Unless something entirely unexpected transpires, I expect him to dominate the day. Not only is he well suited to the course, he'll have the extra motivation of wanting to secure as much time as possible prior to the iTT on the following day.

    If Nibali loses time, I expect he'll lose big. He wants to win, and nothing short of first place is going to satisfy him. Maybe Roglič will find himself in a position to take advantage of that. If chaos ensues, and any teams or riders start to panic, the Slovenian's cool head may serve him well. We will see. We will see. I trust that this stage will deliver something well worth watching.

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  • Drummer Boy

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    Nibali may even be able to play Carapaz against Landa - we saw some cracks in the teamwork on stage 17.

    That's the thing, right there. Landa is leaving the team, and his still certainly unhappy about having to surrender the role of team leader for this race. If he gets too selfish, and team loyalties are divided too heavily between Landa and Carapaz, then the Ecuadorean may find himself without the support that he needs, and deserves, to secure the Maglia Rosa.

    It would be catastrophic for Carapaz, but it could happen. If Movistar can't unite as a team around the race leader, then Nibali's experience, pride and determination may allow him to take advantage of that.

    I'd be shocked if Yates were to reassert himself into a truly threatening position, but if he's on form, his own performance could be enough of a distraction to upset the balance of power.

    I'd say we still have a good race ahead of us.  :cool
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Drummer Boy

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     :P  :cool

    https://twitter.com/diegovos_/status/1134841487093575680

    Quote
    Lopez avoided punishment from the race jury, who classified his outburst as a 'human reaction'.

    Astana DS Giuseppe Martinelli was relieved that the jury let the incident pass without punishment.

    "Some kind of punishment would be totally unfair after he was the one who was knocked down and lost time. If he’s punished it’d be the end of cycling as a sport," Martinelli told Cyclingnews. "I think it’s normal that he reacted as he did. He was on the way to winning the stage… I’m only sorry that he didn’t give the spectator some more punishment, he deserved it for what he did.
     :lol
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  • Drummer Boy

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     :shh

    https://twitter.com/gcntweet/status/1134865832876617729

    Primož appeared just a bit too comfortable with that assistance.  :D

    No swipe of the hand or outward rejection whatsoever. Luckily the push, and the penalty, wasn't a game-changer for him, his competitors, or the race overall. It would be a terrible way to win, or lose, for anyone.

    I missed this live, but I'm hearing that that first push may have lasted as long as 30 seconds?! If anyone has a longer and more complete version, please share.


    As a sidenote:

    I've noticed that the powers-that-be seem to be clamping down on any stage replays that usually pop up on Youtube. It's been very hard to find any quality, unsanctioned clips that are more than just a few seconds long. It's usually quite easy to find clips of an hour or more from any of the big races, but not so much with this year's Giro.

    :slow
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  • « Last Edit: June 02, 2019, 02:47 by Drummer Boy »

    AG

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    yeah I watched the Roglic push - it did last a loooonng time.   well - it was actually 2 pushes.  1 for a long time and then when he stopped a 2nd fan stepped in and pushed for another couple of seconds.

    Having said that - Roglic was on his limit, concentrating on the road and on not crashing into the guy in front of him - so taking his hands off/moving positions etc was going to disrupt him so I can understand why he didnt.

    I think 10 seconds is completely fair.  The organisers dont want to allow fans to do this - so they want people to know that if they push their rider, he will not be advantaged ... but they dont want to punish Roglic for something a fan did either.

    Roglic will get the time back on Landa today anyway.
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  • AG

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    Lopez decision - or non decision as it is  :D

    Also I think a good decision.   The rules say he should be DQ'd ... but I think its good that the race jury took the circumstances, the emotions and way that it happened etc into account and used a bit of common sense.     It was not malicious, it didnt harm the spectator ... it was pure frustration at being knocked off his bike by a stupid moron who should not have been there.

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