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AG

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Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
« Reply #120 on: March 20, 2020, 00:18 »
Here is Aus they still have not closed schools. 

They have announced closed borders at least, and some social distancing measures ... but people dont really take them that seriously.  People are still going out to eat and socialise and some sport is still on.

We dont have many cases ... but it is trending the exact same way as everywhere else, so I am not sure why the govt believes that we will be any different.
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #121 on: March 20, 2020, 14:38 »
    They have announced closed borders at least

    I thought those were called the Indian and Pacific oceans? :slow  :P

    Surprised to hear that it's not being taken more seriously otherwise, though. Are they waiting for a bigger case study than what most of the planet is already offering?
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #122 on: March 20, 2020, 18:44 »
    The restrictions and confinements are creeping ever-closer to our state line.  :wut

    New York Governor Cuomo shuts down "non-essential" businesses amid coronavirus


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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #123 on: March 20, 2020, 22:42 »
    Here is Aus they still have not closed schools. 

    People are still going out to eat and socialise and some sport is still on.

    Those things aren't necessarily bad ... check out what Singapore did - and they're considered one of the leaders in managing this thing:
    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/coronavirus/120433407/why-singapores-coronavirus-response-worked--and-what-we-can-all-learn?rm=m

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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #124 on: March 20, 2020, 23:03 »
    well, the circumstances in Singapore are a bit different though, located on an island with just a handful of ways inside the city/country.

    They did a good job keeping it under control for sure, especially as they acted early on, completely isolating the cases and tracking back all contacts they had. But we are far beyond the point where similar measures could still work out elsewhere.
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    Drummer Boy

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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #125 on: March 20, 2020, 23:42 »
    Those things aren't necessarily bad ... check out what Singapore did

    Thanks for sharing that. That was quite an interesting read.

    One thing that was conspicuously missing was any mention of the climate/temps. There was initial speculation that warmer whether inhibited the spread of the virus, and I remember some pointing to Singapore as possible validation of that. But then I saw a report that disputed this notion, and I haven't heard much about it since. But I do wonder if climate played a role at all, however minor, in curbing the effects of the virus in Singapore.

    Three main things jumped out for me in that article:

    1) Keeping the schools open (without any apparent crisis arising as a result).

    2) The importance of clear and orderly communication from the government top-down.

    3) The fact that the previous Sars outbreak served as a valuable dress-rehearsal. Which is made even more impressive when one realizes that that was nearly 20 years ago, and yet the country still remained vigilant so many years later.

    That's what I feel can be the silver lining to the current COVID-19 pandemic. If there's anything positive to come out of this, it's that, hopefully, all countries and will be better prepared in terms of stock piling the necessary medical supplies ahead of time, and systems of quick-reaction will be put in place to respond in the event of something even much more serious.

    The other, and perhaps much more significant, gain to be made from all this is a general public that now fully understands the concept of what a pandemic is, what it can do, and how quickly it can escalate. Even more beneficial is having a public that understands shut-down mode. Prior to all this (and this only goes back a few weeks), it was nearly inconceivable that so much travel would be restricted, and that so many people would be forced to stay at home. Should the need for a similar response arise in the near future, it would be exponentially easier for people to wrap their heads around what needs to be done, and what it looks and feels like to do it.
     
    That, to me, is an invaluable lesson to be learned from all this, and there's really no substitute for the real thing. There's just no way we could've staged a world-wide preparatory drill before this. It could only be done when faced with reality. But considering the fact that scientists have been warning of pandemics, super-bugs, and even the potential for bio-warfare, for many years, this may turn out to be little more than a "fire-drill" for the future.
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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #126 on: March 21, 2020, 00:41 »
    well, the circumstances in Singapore are a bit different though, located on an island with just a handful of ways inside the city/country.

    They did a good job keeping it under control for sure, especially as they acted early on, completely isolating the cases and tracking back all contacts they had. But we are far beyond the point where similar measures could still work out elsewhere.
    As someone who has spent an extended time living and working in SIN ...
    It is true that they are a small space with limited access points - but those points absolutely hum and are an absolute hub for so many locations. The shipping traffic is, i would argue, far more significant as an access point - both crews and cargoes (and the sheer number of diverse vessels!)
    They also wouldn't close off the bridges from Malaysia - the country is absolutely reliant on Malaysian workers at all levels and in all sectors ...

    I would also be interested to know how effective those measures would be at a later stage in the disease cycle. True, you wouldn't hold at SIN levels, but would they still prove a really significant cap???
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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #127 on: March 21, 2020, 00:49 »
    Thanks for sharing that. That was quite an interesting read.

    One thing that was conspicuously missing was any mention of the climate/temps. There was initial speculation that warmer whether inhibited the spread of the virus, and I remember some pointing to Singapore as possible validation of that. But then I saw a report that disputed this notion, and I haven't heard much about it since. But I do wonder if climate played a role at all, however minor, in curbing the effects of the virus in Singapore.

    '''

    3) The fact that the previous Sars outbreak served as a valuable dress-rehearsal. Which is made even more impressive when one realizes that that was nearly 20 years ago, and yet the country still remained vigilant so many years later.

    That, to me, is an invaluable lesson to be learned from all this, and there's really no substitute for the real thing. There's just no way we could've staged a world-wide preparatory drill before this. It could only be done when faced with reality. But considering the fact that scientists have been warning of pandemics, super-bugs, and even the potential for bio-warfare, for many years, this may turn out to be little more than a "fire-drill" for the future.
    I agree about it being interesting ... and have to say, all parochialism aside, that the Kiwi papers are actually doing a pretty good job at informing rather than inflaming the public ...

    To your point about climate ...

    Have you seen this? It's in the seat pocket ... Oops, sorry ... was on a plane again yesterday (domestic only) ...

    But, seriously, here's a really interesting article about climate - as well as temperature and humidity. Basically science is confirming what Grandma knew - sunlight, warm temps and fresh air beats a bug ...! Also gives some real hope to a possible end date for this situation ...
    https://www.theglobeandmail.com/world/article-the-slow-spread-of-coronavirus-in-thailand-offers-hope-warmer-weather/?fbclid=IwAR3jY6M2nV2Z8oOI71Q1ldsPE37APoVqKTQtGHGOwY-ro8PhmolPLfkDqZs

    And for your point about learning ... I think that Singapore is an outlier (in learning on most topics - kinda like Japan was 100 or so years back before it became a place that the west started learning from). That said, this article on the Spanish Flu in NZ shows that we have learned much from 2018.
    https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/coronavirus/120354661/pathetically-understaffed-and-hopelessly-complacent-lessons-from-black-november
    (For anyone wanting a reference - in 1918, NZ's population was a bit over 1.1m. Auckland is now a city of 1.5m and Wellington, the capital, is about 300k.)

    One thing that interests and confuses me in that article is how they credit "herd immunity" with helping beat the Spanish Flu, yet now we are so "dependent" on vaccines as the only true, long term solution ... Wonder why? Perhaps we have become weaker as we've become more "sanitary"???
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #128 on: March 21, 2020, 02:14 »
    Basically science is confirming what Grandma knew - sunlight, warm temps and fresh air beats a bug ...!

    Thanks, I'll check out those links. As to the above...

    I was joking among some friends that, won't it just be the case that those idiotic college kids in Florida, flaunting their participation in Spring Break, will dodge the bullet simply because coronavirus does not like sand, sunshine and saltwiter. (And who knows, maybe the virus is not fond of Mexican beer either, so those dumb kids may just be inadvertently inoculating themselves with hubris.)

    (Btw, the Gov of Florida has finally closed the beaches and sent those brats packing.)
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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #129 on: March 21, 2020, 02:43 »


    It appears that my home state is joining in the fun too.  :wut

    Gov. Lamont Orders Non-Essential Businesses Closed; Urges Residents to Stay Home

    Lamont is issuing an executive order to slow the growth of coronavirus in Connecticut and allow for as many available hospital beds as possible.

    ----------------

    What to Know

    - Governor Ned Lamont is signing an executive order as part of a new campaign called "Stay Safe, Stay at Home" that will require non-essential businesses to close.

    - The order will take effect at 8 p.m. on Monday, March 23.

    - A number of exemptions of essential services will be laid out in the coming days, but will include grocery stores, pharmacies, gas stations, ongoing major construction projects and defense industry manufacturing.[/quote]

    "Those retail stores that are non-essential, do not open," he said.

    Businesses that don't comply could face civil fines, Lamont said.

    The closures will take effect at 8 p.m. on Monday, March 23 and could last for weeks, he said:sick

    --------------

    Exemptions from the order will likely include:

    Grocery stores
    Take out and delivery food service
    Gas stations
    Pharmacies
    Major construction projects already underway
    Major defense manufacturing facilities
    Public transportation
    Childcare services
    Auto repair stores
    Hardware stores
    Banks/Financial institutions

    and...

    Package stores.
    You can only push people so far!  :yuush

    ------------------

    Serious question though:
    What about bike shops? Do I need to stock up now on tyres, tubes, chain lube, etc.? :slow

    I'm not sure they've fully thought this through!   :o


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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #130 on: March 21, 2020, 07:33 »
    As someone who has spent an extended time living and working in SIN ...
    It is true that they are a small space with limited access points - but those points absolutely hum and are an absolute hub for so many locations. The shipping traffic is, i would argue, far more significant as an access point - both crews and cargoes (and the sheer number of diverse vessels!)
    They also wouldn't close off the bridges from Malaysia - the country is absolutely reliant on Malaysian workers at all levels and in all sectors ...

    I would also be interested to know how effective those measures would be at a later stage in the disease cycle. True, you wouldn't hold at SIN levels, but would they still prove a really significant cap???

    I don't know, really, personal I struggle to see it. Singapore started this when they had a dozen positive cases or so, and the risk to import more of them was basically limited to China (leading to screenings and tests at the airport and so on) - now we have ten thousands (or probably way more) over here in Germany alone, who got in contact with a million other people I guess, and everyone who comes into the country is basically a person of risk to spread it further, no matter where from.

    I agree that new strategies need to be found for sure though. The "flatten the curve" approach is not a bad one to begin with, but if we really manage to keep it that low that the health care system can cope with it (if the expected numbers are correct), that would also mean that it takes 10 years or so to get done with it - which obviously is not a real option.

    Even if we get a vaccine in one year, or some medication in 6 months... this is still fairly far away. And so far I haven't read/heard much what's supposed to happen until then. Are we currently just postponing the big blow by 2 months or so to get the hospitals prepared for it at least?! Will we just lock in all elderly and sick people for a year?! I don't know. And I surely wouldn't want to be the one to decide.
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #131 on: March 21, 2020, 10:30 »
    Even if we get a vaccine in one year, or some medication in 6 months... this is still fairly far away. And so far I haven't read/heard much what's supposed to happen until then. Are we currently just postponing the big blow by 2 months or so to get the hospitals prepared for it at least?! Will we just lock in all elderly and sick people for a year?! I don't know. And I surely wouldn't want to be the one to decide.
    Test, then isolate & treat the positives.

    And people shouldn't be tested once, then be done with it. They should be tested several times. Per day.

    Obviously this doesn't need to be the full test every time. But temperature scanners at the entrance to every supermarket etc. would be a good first step.

    An interview with an epidemiologist "who helped defeat smallpox":
    https://www.wired.com/story/coronavirus-interview-larry-brilliant-smallpox-epidemiologist/

    A full lock-down, Italy style, can always ever be the first measure. Already there is fallout from it:
    https://twitter.com/andreabagnato/status/1240692360532471812

    This article even has a tl;dr aka. abstract at the top:
    https://medium.com/@tomaspueyo/coronavirus-the-hammer-and-the-dance-be9337092b56

    Quote
    Summary of the article: Strong coronavirus measures today should only last a few weeks, there shouldn’t be a big peak of infections afterwards, and it can all be done for a reasonable cost to society, saving millions of lives along the way. If we don’t take these measures, tens of millions will be infected, many will die, along with anybody else that requires intensive care, because the healthcare system will have collapsed.
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    Flo

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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #132 on: March 21, 2020, 11:39 »
    Singapore used the track and trace method and managed to control the outbreak pretty efficiently. However, to accomplish that they ordered several plane loads of tests, something they could do because they were one of the earliest countries to start combatting the virus. Fact is there aren't enough tests to even remotely follow the track, trace and isolate method in most Western countries. I know Germany is testing a lot of people, but here in the Netherlands, authorities have been forced to limit testing only to the elderly and vulnerable showing significant symptoms. This is also the reason why our death rate is so high compared to the number of confirmed cases.
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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #133 on: March 21, 2020, 11:51 »
    yeah, I've read some of those articles about mitigation/suppression, but tbh, to me, they all seem to say basically nothing.

    The article Lukas quoted for example says that we need a suppression strategy, "The Hammer". Which means "act[ing] quickly and aggressively". Because a "heavy Hammer with strict social distancing measures, can definitely control the outbreak within weeks. It’s a matter of discipline, execution, and how much the population abides by the rules."

    What does this mean though? The guy on Twitter you quoted claims that most people are infected at work - wo what's the conclusion of that? Everyone stays at home for three week and we weld shut all doors like in China?!
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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #134 on: March 21, 2020, 12:34 »
    I don't know, really, personal I struggle to see it. Singapore started this when they had a dozen positive cases or so, and the risk to import more of them was basically limited to China (leading to screenings and tests at the airport and so on) - now we have ten thousands (or probably way more) over here in Germany alone, who got in contact with a million other people I guess, and everyone who comes into the country is basically a person of risk to spread it further, no matter where from.

    Interesting article that I just read this morning - also on Singapore's approach ...

    Says that the ship hasn't sailed for implementing it in other countries, including Canada, just because they didn't act at the same stage of the cycle as Singapore did ....

    https://nationalpost.com/health/how-taiwan-and-singapore-managed-to-contain-covid-19-while-letting-normal-life-go-on
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #135 on: March 21, 2020, 12:51 »
    here in the Netherlands, authorities have been forced to limit testing only to the elderly and vulnerable showing significant symptoms.

    It's quite difficult to get tested here, as well, from what I understand.

    To my knowledge, you'd have to be showing very clear symptoms, then you'd be tested for strep, influenza, and maybe a few other things. Only if those come back negative would you then be eligible for a coronavirus test.

    The exceptions to that would be if you had contact with someone who had tested positive, or had traveled to a high-risk area.
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  • Flo

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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #136 on: March 21, 2020, 13:12 »
    It's quite difficult to get tested here, as well, from what I understand.

    To my knowledge, you'd have to be showing very clear symptoms, then you'd be tested for strep, influenza, and maybe a few other things. Only if those come back negative would you then be eligible for a coronavirus test.

    The exceptions to that would be if you had contact with someone who had tested positive, or had traveled to a high-risk area.
    Yeah, that's what the testing protocol was like here first. Only if you were showing symptoms, had been in contact with someone who was confirmed as infected, or traveled to China or northern Italy. Although my brother's girlfriend's parents both got the virus, father was in hospital for over a week before he was tested (though to be fair this was before the first case here was announced), mother got ill a couple days later but she was never tested, they just assumed she was infected also. But now even less people are tested. I don't know how countries like Germany have so many more tests than us.
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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #137 on: March 21, 2020, 13:33 »
    Sweden is the same Flo, only those with very bad symptoms or Acute Respiratory infection are being tested. Not even medical staff. This is a Government decision. So our real figures I assume 3-4 higher so about 4000-5000
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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #138 on: March 21, 2020, 13:42 »
    But now even less people are tested. I don't know how countries like Germany have so many more tests than us.

    I don't know what the exact numbers are for the Netherlands, but in Germany something between ~150-200k tests per week can be analysed. Under huge efforts those numbers could be stretched by another 30% or so, but that's it. So even here, mass testing is not an option, as it's just not possible.

    South Korea is testing 12000 people a day by the way, so (although the exact numbers are not known for Germany) it's actually not as much as media reports make it sound like. At that rate, it would still take them 12 years to test the whole country (once).

    edit: last week ~16000 people in Germany tested positive, so if we assume that the vast majority of tests returned negative (a number of 95% was circulating a couple of days ago, which probably has changed) we must be at the limit with that testing as well - and yes, also only testing those with clear symptons/records
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  • « Last Edit: March 21, 2020, 14:00 by search »

    Joelsim

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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #139 on: March 21, 2020, 14:28 »
    Sweden is the same Flo, only those with very bad symptoms or Acute Respiratory infection are being tested. Not even medical staff. This is a Government decision. So our real figures I assume 3-4 higher so about 4000-5000

    When we had 1,200 confirmed cases, the estimated number of actual cases was in excess of 50,000.
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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #140 on: March 21, 2020, 15:05 »
    When we had 1,200 confirmed cases, the estimated number of actual cases was in excess of 50,000.

    Wow, much smaller country here though but very scary figures
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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #141 on: March 21, 2020, 15:15 »
    When we had 1,200 confirmed cases, the estimated number of actual cases was in excess of 50,000.

    Over 50,000?
    I saw guesstimates for 20,000-50,000 at the same point.
    Depends what you want to believe I suppose.
    I take consolation from the fact that if true, the virus is a heck of a lot less lethal than any percentages based upon confirmed cases
    There are lots of numbers being batted about these days.
    Case in point regarding potential death toll, but an interesting read as it's not as inflammatory as much of the BBC's normal output.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-51979654

     

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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #142 on: March 21, 2020, 15:48 »
    Yes, I’m inclined to think the death rate is actually way lower than the percentages we’re led to believe. If you look at the countries where there is loads of testing there are much fewer deaths per actual case. Countries such as Germany.

    In the UK and many other places it looks much higher, as I suspect there are tens or perhaps hundreds of thousands of cases that are recovered from in isolation but which never get included in the stats because those people go nowhere near a hospital.
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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #143 on: March 21, 2020, 16:35 »
    Yes, I’m inclined to think the death rate is actually way lower than the percentages we’re led to believe. If you look at the countries where there is loads of testing there are much fewer deaths per actual case. Countries such as Germany.

    it look like, yeah. Although the fact that in Germany many people who were initially tested (positive) were those coming back from work travels, holiday (skiing in the Alpes) and so on, may play its part as well, leading to a younger/fitter part of the population getting in touch with the virus.

    Just recently we also had the first positives in a retirement home, leading to 9 deaths pretty much immediately. All of them were old of course and had underlying medical condition, but it also shows that there's not much doubt that the virus is of high risk for those, no matter in which part of the world you're living.

    https://www.br.de/nachrichten/bayern/neun-menschen-in-pflegeheim-an-corona-infektion-gestorben,Rto86kr

    Of course, as the article MV linked above pointed out, there's the possibility that the effects on the overall mortality rate in 2020 will be minor, but it's still worrying, what other effects it may have if many of those need help at the same time (like in Italy).
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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #144 on: March 21, 2020, 16:55 »

    Just recently we also had the first positives in a retirement home, leading to 9 deaths pretty much immediately. All of them were old of course and had underlying medical condition, but it also shows that there's not much doubt that the virus is of high risk for those, no matter in which part of the world you're living.


     The very first case we had in my district was about 500 metres from where I live.................in a retirement home.
    I guess that visitors come from all over the place and that someone had recently returned from Italy.
     I have been outside just 3 times this week. This afternoon I went for a walk around and everything looked absolutely normal, right down to a gang of kids playing football and others generally socializing. That's why I don't think closing schools is the greatest of ideas.
     A stark contrast to the big cities, where the changes implemented have had the biggest impact on the way of life.
     Not surprising therefore, that opinions differ.................at least for the moment.
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #145 on: March 21, 2020, 17:00 »
    In the UK and many other places it looks much higher, as I suspect there are tens or perhaps hundreds of thousands of cases that are recovered from in isolation but which never get included in the stats because those people go nowhere near a hospital.

    That's a good point that I hadn't fully considered.

    I imagine there are probably three loose categories:

     - Those who get the sick, suspect they have the virus, but recover easily enough and never really know because the test wasn't available to them.

     - Those who get virus but show such mild symptoms that it never occurs to them that they had the COVID-19.

     - Those who get the virus but show no signs at all (unless I'm wrong about that being a possibility).

    Either way, I don't think the powers-that-be have even come close to estimating the true cost and lasting impact that all these shut-downs are going to have. I have a number of friends who had opened their own coffee shops in just the past few years, and others who have been part of the rapidly-expanding microbrewery movement. I've no idea how they're going to survive this. These particular breweries were in-house-only operations, so they have no retail products on the shelves to carry them over.  The coffee shops can still offer takeout service, but none of the places that I'm referring to are even set up properly for that. They don't have drive-thru windows, so unless they setup a table on the sidewalk outside their business, they have a very limited capacity to serve their customers. And I've no idea what rules are even in place to determine what's allowed and what's not under those circumstances.

    So how is this supposed to work? All landlords, and utilities, and town taxes, etc are just going to wave all fees? Not likely. Property evictions and utility shut-offs have been prohibited for now, but how much money in back-pay and taxes is going to accumulate? This is just completely uncharted territory.

    Another friend of a friend owns multiple restaurants/bars and package (liquor) stores. The restaurants have had to close, but supposedly the sales at package stores has been astronomical that it's going to hold-over the other businesses...for now.

    This is insane.
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  • Joelsim

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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #146 on: March 21, 2020, 17:09 »
    The very first case we had in my district was about 500 metres from where I live.................in a retirement home.
    I guess that visitors come from all over the place and that someone had recently returned from Italy.
     I have been outside just 3 times this week. This afternoon I went for a walk around and everything looked absolutely normal, right down to a gang of kids playing football and others generally socializing. That's why I don't think closing schools is the greatest of ideas.
     A stark contrast to the big cities, where the changes implemented have had the biggest impact on the way of life.
     Not surprising therefore, that opinions differ.................at least for the moment.

    Most people are starting to observe social distancing. Sadly there are still some who aren’t.
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  • Joelsim

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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #147 on: March 21, 2020, 17:16 »
    Pics of Central London this morning, a Saturday. Piccadilly Circus, Leicester Square, Carnaby St, Trafalgar Square...

    https://www.facebook.com/657367045/posts/10156695896177046/
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  • Echoes

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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #148 on: March 22, 2020, 00:15 »
    Could anyone more knowledgeable than I am tell me more about this chloroquine stuff or hydroxychloroquine?

    Pr Didier Raoult of Marseille is an expert in this field and says it works miracle on coronavirus patients. It's a medication that is traditionally used to treat malaria. So it's also said that if Sub-Saharian African countries are pretty kept from the virus, it could be because they are used to getting such treatment to beat malaria and that's how they could be immune to it. Nothing to do with heat, they say ...

    Could it be really a miracle stuff?

    Or course, then, we'd have to discuss the side effects linked to that medication ...

    Post Merge: March 22, 2020, 00:19
    Pics of Central London this morning, a Saturday. Piccadilly Circus, Leicester Square, Carnaby St, Trafalgar Square...

    https://www.facebook.com/657367045/posts/10156695896177046/

    Reminds me of Eugène Atget's Paris photographies in the early 20th century

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  • "Paris-Roubaix is the biggest cycling race in the world, bigger than the Tour de France, bigger than any other bike race" (Sir Bradley Wiggins)

    AG

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    Re: Coronavirus COVID-19 P/B Wuhan, China
    « Reply #149 on: March 22, 2020, 04:09 »
    here in West Aus you can only get tested if you are displaying symptoms AND can prove that you have travelled in the last week or have had contact with someone already diagnosed.

    essentially, even if you are displaying symptoms you cant get tested for half the time.

    and then they wonder why our numbers are so much less than the rest of the country/world.


    People are starting to take notice of the social distancing thing ... but still not closed schools or workplaces.  We are pretty heavy into mining and oil and gas though, and many of those companies are putting in work from home strategies and the like.  Still, its getting pretty real
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