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Echoes

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119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
« on: April 13, 2022, 15:18 »

Paris-Roubaix 2022

Paris-Roubaix, the Queen of the Classics, traditionally was held on Easter Sunday for many years. Therefore it got the nickname the "Easter Race" ("La Pascale"), which looks like a holier compensation for its other well-known nickname the "Hell of the North". This year, it looks like Paris-Roubaix is going to be "La Pascale" once again. This because of the French Presidential election, last week. ASO postponed it a week later than first planned, a switch with Amstel Gold, for the first time. Last year, the race was held in Autumn, now it's back to spring but still not at its usual slot a week after the Tour of Flanders. It might be interesting to see whether the cobbled specialists have been able to keep their form for so long after Omloop Het Nieuwsblad. It probably will still be too soon for Wout van Aert to come back though but its team Jumbo Visma still maintains the probability that he starts. Wout is training back but it doesn't mean that he will even start, let alone be a contender. Virologist Mark Van Ranst advised him against racing.


Paris-Roubaix will forever be known for its very sharp flat cobble sections, usually 2 or 3 km long. The most famous of which being the Arenberg Forest ! A 2.3 km long straight trench cutting the forest ! It was discovered by Jean Stablinski #rainbow and added to the 1968 edition ! The French former World Champion with Polish roots had been a coal miner in that area. He's known as the only person to have "worked" both below and above. He was booed by his peers at the end of that edition but ultimately he realised that a great champion had won, so it worked well. The winner that year was no other than Eddy Merckx, of course ! Nonetheless, race organiser Jacques Goddet famously called it the "Last insanity of the sport of cycling" ("la dernière folie du sport cycliste"). Yet the Forest was removed for several years in 1974 and only added back in the eighties, which means that the expert and still record holder Roger De Vlaeminck only won one of his 4 wins with the Forest on the route.


Lesser known but more decisive because situated towards the end of the race is the no less harsh 2,1 km long "Carrefour de l'Arbre" ("The Tree Crossroad").


The Carrefour de l'Arbre was a long time ago the setting of the Battle of Bouvine between King Philip II August of France and the Holy Roman Emperor Otto IV along with his allies. That was in 1214. By the end of the section, the riders are passing by the café/inn "L'arbre". In 1274, people could already be served a drink there. There are a lot of legends that are connected with this café. It was held by Mrs Jeanne, a colourful figure in the area. Some say that riders used to stop there and have a final drink before either reaching Roubaix or get back to Cysoing and retire. The name itself is doubtful. Nobody knows if there had been a particular tree to name the café after but not far from it you have the "Chapelle aux arbres" which probably gave its name to the café and which reputedly has been erected in memory of the Battle of Bouvines.


The Carrefour de l'Arbre has systematically been added to the Paris-Roubaix route since 1980. It was probably Marc Madiot's favourite section. He made his two decisive attacks in 1985 and in 1991 on it. He said that he was 4 times in the lead group on the Carrefour de l'Arbre, twice he knew he could win, twice he knew could not. But the most impressive ride on this 5-star section was in my opinion Peter Van Petegem's in 2003, closing the gap to Pieri before handling him in a tactical sprint of the Velodrome.


Here are the 30 cobble sections for this year (the final 17 ones are also on the women's race)

30 : Troisvilles à Inchy (km 96,3 – 2,2 km)
29 : Viesly à Quiévy (km 102,8 – 1,8 km)
28 : Quiévy à Saint-Python (km 105,4 – 3,7 km)
27 : Saint-Python (km 110,1 – 1,5 km)
26 : Vertain à Saint-Martin-sur-Écaillon à Vertain (km 117,9 – 2,3 km)
25 : Haussy (km 123,7 ; 0,8 km)
24. Saulzoir à Verchain-Maugré (km 130,6 ; 1,2 km)
23 : Verchain-Maugré à Quérénaing (134,9 ; 1,6 km)
22 : Quérénaing à Maing (km 138,1 – 2,5 km)
21 : Maing à Monchaux-sur-Écaillon (km 141,2 – 1,6 km)
20 : Haveluy à Wallers (km 154,2 – 2,5 km)
19 : Trouée d’Arenberg (km 162,4 – 2,3 km)
18 : Wallers à Hélesmes (km 168,4 – 1,6 km)
17 : Hornaing à Wandignies (km 175,2 – 3,7 km)
16 : Warlaing à Brillon (km 182,7 – 2,4 km)
15 : Tilloy à Sars-et-Rosières (km 186,2 – 2,4 km)
14 : Beuvry-la-Forêt à Orchies (km 192,5 – 1,4 km)
13 : Orchies (km 197,5 – 1,7 km)
12 : Auchy-lez-Orchies à Bersée (km 203,6 – 2,7 km)
11 : Mons-en-Pévèle (km 209,1 – 3 km)
10 : Mérignies à Avelin (km 215,1 – 0,7 km)
9 : Pont-Thibault à Ennevelin (km 218,5 – 1,4 km)
8 : Templeuve – L’Épinette (km 223,9 – 0,2 km)
8 : Templeuve – Moulin-de-Vertain (km 224,4 – 0,5 km)
7 : Cysoing à Bourghelles (km 230,8 – 1,3 km)
6 : Bourghelles à Wannehain (km 233,3 – 1,1 km)
5 : Camphin-en-Pévèle (km 237,8 – 1,8 km)
4 : Carrefour de l’Arbre (km 240,5 – 2,1 km)
3 : Gruson (km 242,8 – 1,1 km)
2 : Willems à Hem (km 249,5 – 1,4 km)
1 : Roubaix – Espace Charles Crupelandt (km 256,3 – 0,3 km)


The men's race will be covered live from start to finish at 10.50am CET on Eurosport 2 and Eurosport Player, among other channels.

A start list for both women's and men's races can be found here.

Mathieu van der Poel is definitely the man to beat. He could make history as the first non-Belgian non Swiss to win win back to back Tour of Flanders and Paris-Roubaix. It is indeed quite surprising to see that the two non Belgians to achieve that feat so far have both been Swiss. Anyone remembers Fabian Cancellara's achievements but the very first to do it in 1923 is his fellow countrymen Heiri Suter. Otherwise, you only have Belgian specialists :

1923 : Heiri Suter  *ch
1932 : Romain Gijssels *be
1934 : Gaston Rebry *be (declared winner after Roger Lapébie's DSQ for an illegal bike change)
1954 : Raymond Impanis *be
1957 : Fred De Bruyne *be
1962 : Rik Van Looy *be
1977 : Roger De Vlaeminck *be
2003 : Peter Van Petegem *be
2005 : Tom Boonen *be
2010 : Fabian Cancellara  *ch
2012 : Tom Boonen *be
2013 : Fabian Cancellara *ch

And of course, a Paris-Roubaix Preview wouldn't be a Paris-Roubaix preview without ...

... A SUNDAY IN HELL


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  • « Last Edit: May 06, 2022, 00:04 by Echoes »
    "Paris-Roubaix is the biggest cycling race in the world, bigger than the Tour de France, bigger than any other bike race" (Sir Bradley Wiggins)

    Echoes

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #1 on: April 14, 2022, 11:45 »
    https://www.velo-club.net/post/wout-van-aert-sera-bien-present-au-depart-de-paris-roubaix

    Wout Van Aert received a green light from the Jumbo Visma medical staff to start Paris-Roubaix. I hope they know what they are doing.  :o

    Post Merge: April 14, 2022, 12:54
    https://sporza.be/nl/2022/04/14/wout-van-aert-zal-zondag-aan-de-start-staan-van-parijs-roubaix~1649912733316/

    Jumbo Visma say that Wout's health is absolutely OK, that they are very careful with their contaminated riders and that their decision was well considered.

    However as Wout has been isolated for a week, top form is not there, so he might start the race as a domestique for Christophe Laporte, Mike Teunissen or Nathan Van Hooydonck.

    There's also more and more talk about Wout's first participation at Liège-Bastogne-Liège. He would himself love to. https://www.dhnet.be/sports/cyclisme/wout-van-aert-vers-une-premiere-participation-au-liege-bastogne-liege-6256ad267b50a67460c764f3
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  • « Last Edit: April 14, 2022, 12:54 by Echoes, Reason: Merged DoublePost »

    Leadbelly

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #2 on: April 14, 2022, 18:46 »
    Does nobody else think the race should be held at this time of the year (Autumn) permanently?

    The weather is more likely to add to the entertainment at this time of the year and it gives the cobbles specialists a second major bite of the cherry if they are ill/injured/off-form in the spring. There already is a block of nice classics from Plouay through to Paris-Tour, but it just lacks a main event I think.

    Just some blue sky thinking.

    https://twitter.com/WielerFlits/status/1514608780599652354

    Quote
    UCI president David Lappartient is open to radically reforming the WorldTour calendar in the coming years. One of the possibilities that the Frenchman suggests is to end the cycling season in the autumn with the Tour of Flanders and Paris-Roubaix.

    I wouldn't move both, but why not PR?
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  • Echoes

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #3 on: April 14, 2022, 22:19 »
    It would sadden me to be honest but that's just my personal subjectivity. Objectively, I'm not so sure that autumn weather is always as rainy and windy as it was last year. It can be very hot in late September and early October here in Belgium/Northern France. I remember visiting the start of Paris-Brussels (Brussels Cycling Classic) back in 2017. It was bright and sunny. Also I think that Paris-Roubaix is hard enough. Even in sunny weather it still is a hard race. Dust replaces mud, that's it. I agree that it gets even more spectacular under the rain but every race whatsoever are more spectacular in the rain and in the wind. Not just Paris-Roubaix ! In my opinion, the Tour of Flanders needs bad weather more badly to make it hard than Paris-Roubaix does.

    This being said, it would be interesting to have a couple of Flemish cobble races later in the season. That's what I thought back a few decades ago. It would open up a second season for cobble specialists instead of having all of them stuck within a span of two months. Having Ghent-Wevelgem in the end of the season for example ! However nowadays, you can have cobble specialists performing all year long, so it's no longer needed.
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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #4 on: April 14, 2022, 22:59 »
    I agree. I mean, the Ronde and Roubaix aren't just a part of the spring season, they are bascically the whole "purpose" of it. Races like Harelbeke or Waregem are nice, but mainly to build up the tension  - there's no way I could see them taking over that role in absence of a monument to follow. More like in contrary. They could become somewhat pointless, like it happened in Italy for example, when the preparation races in autumn ended up taking place after Lombardia.
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  • "If this is cycling, I am a banana"

    Echoes

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #5 on: April 14, 2022, 23:12 »
    Some wonderful drone views of the Wallers-Arenberg mining site on Odysee.

    https://odysee.com/@dronebee.cie:a/arenberg-cut-lp-HD-1080p:c

    I think the entrance of the Arenberg cobble section can be seen at 2.56. At some point, you can see the "Espace Claude Berri", it's an event space named after the French film director who shot Germinal there in 1993, film starring Gérard Depardieu, it was his adaptation of the famous Émile Zola novel.



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  • Echoes

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #6 on: April 14, 2022, 23:26 »
    I agree. I mean, the Ronde and Roubaix aren't just a part of the spring season, they are bascically the whole "purpose" of it. Races like Harelbeke or Waregem are nice, but mainly to build up the tension  - there's no way I could see them taking over that role in absence of a monument to follow. More like in contrary. They could become somewhat pointless, like it happened in Italy for example, when the preparation races in autumn ended up taking place after Lombardia.

    You might be right but the difference is that the Italian semi-classics have much more conventional routes based on asphalt relatively short climbs while you don't have that many races on cobbles. Sure Harelbeke and Waregem should remain to build up tension before the main cobble spring classics but then after Paris-Roubaix it looks as though the cobble racing season is almost over. Ghent-Wevelgem is a more prestigious history and can be a target for some cobble specialists, surely on the current route. It can be coupled with races such as Dwars door het Hageland, for instance. These are just criticizeable ideas, though.
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  • Echoes

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #7 on: April 15, 2022, 02:11 »
    https://www.dhnet.be/sports/cyclisme/paris-roubaix-des-brebis-pour-sauver-la-trouee-d-arenberg-62580f527b50a67460dbe2f7



    Sheep (ewes) are requested to remove weeds from the Arenberg Forest cobble section

    Since Paris-Roubaix was cancelled in 2020 and postponed in 2021, the peloton did not race on the section for 30 months. Last summer, grass has grown unexpectedly on the estimated 276,000 cobbles of the Arenberg Forest. Thierry Gouvenou, race director and former top10 rider in Paris-Roubaix considers a ecological grazing solution to remove the weeds for the cobbles. The Arenberg Forest is a protected site, not opened for motorised vehicles such as cars or tractors. That's why nature gets back so easily. 

    The plan should start next summer, when the grow is faster and the idea is to get a clean Arenberg section next winter and get it ready for next year.

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #8 on: April 15, 2022, 07:30 »
    You might be right but the difference is that the Italian semi-classics have much more conventional routes based on asphalt relatively short climbs while you don't have that many races on cobbles. Sure Harelbeke and Waregem should remain to build up tension before the main cobble spring classics but then after Paris-Roubaix it looks as though the cobble racing season is almost over. Ghent-Wevelgem is a more prestigious history and can be a target for some cobble specialists, surely on the current route. It can be coupled with races such as Dwars door het Hageland, for instance. These are just criticizeable ideas, though.

    yes, I was mainly referring to the idea of moving the Ronde and Roubaix - generally, a little restructuring could make sense. Additionally to DdhH, Also Paris-Tours is now basically a gravel classic, Plouay in parts as well. The new race Pozzato tries to establish is late in the year as well... it should be possible to combine them a bit better, and maybe adding GW as a highlight could be an option, yeah.
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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #9 on: April 15, 2022, 07:55 »
    good to see that Wout can participate, btw. But no Vanmarcke. No Haussler...  :(
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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #10 on: April 15, 2022, 08:30 »
    As Echoes mentioned Madiot: is #groupama the only team with two winners in the team car?!

    25 after Guesdon's victory, Le Télégramme has a little feature today about "les enfants de Frédéric Guesdon" at least, Valentin Madouas and Olivier le Gac.


    https://www.letelegramme.fr/cyclisme/paris-roubaix-les-enfants-de-frederic-guesdon-15-04-2022-12987341.php

    Although Madouas finished 3rd in the Ronde, I'd say le Gac is actually the one who has made the biggest steps this year. He has been very active in basically all classics so far, and if he gets into the right move on Sunday, could turn into a dangerous outsider indeed.
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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #11 on: April 15, 2022, 17:08 »
    It turns that I will, in fact,  have coverage for Paris-Roubax!  :cool

    I only just discovered though as NBC/Peacock seems fully committed to keeping their broadcast schedule a closely-guarded secret for much of the season.  :shh

    I've no idea yet if it will be commercial-free or not, or who the commentators are going to be. But it won't be long now until I find out for myself.  :)
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  • Echoes

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #12 on: April 15, 2022, 18:30 »
    As Echoes mentioned Madiot: is #groupama the only team with two winners in the team car?!

    Most probably. I don't know if there are any other former winners in other teams' staff. Dirk Demol is still active, surely. Peter Van Petegem worked for Garmin when Van Summeren won it but I think he's now only just a race organiser (Het Nieuwsblad).

    Although Madouas finished 3rd in the Ronde, I'd say le Gac is actually the one who has made the biggest steps this year. He has been very active in basically all classics so far, and if he gets into the right move on Sunday, could turn into a dangerous outsider indeed.

    I tend to agree. We shouldn't forget that Paris-Roubaix and the Tour of Flanders are not exactly the same races. An Ardennes-type of rider can perform at the Tour of Flanders but it would be harder for him to do so at Paris-Roubaix where the weight is such an asset. Madouas jr seems more like an Ardennes-type of rider to me (8th at Amstel Gold, 11th at the Arrow). I don't know what is form weight is but isn't he too slim for Paris-Roubaix ?
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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #13 on: April 16, 2022, 07:56 »
    Most probably. I don't know if there are any other former winners in other teams' staff. Dirk Demol is still active, surely. Peter Van Petegem worked for Garmin when Van Summeren won it but I think he's now only just a race organiser (Het Nieuwsblad).

    Ineos probably comes closest with Knaven and Hammond (and Tosatto was 7th as well).

    About Madouas' weight you're probably right. Same for Teuns, I guess, who came in at Bahrain as a replacement for Haussler. They are good on the cobbles, but probably not so much on this kind of.

    The reason I pointed towards le Gac was more that I had always seen him as kind of a "peloton-filler" before, who was mainly racing WT because he is French - so I was surprised to suddenly see him on the attack every race, and often surrounded by real favourites.

    I read an interview with him the other week, and he said it's because he did more training this winter :dizzy
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  • Echoes

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #14 on: April 16, 2022, 11:52 »
    Ah yes before this season, Le Gac's best performance seems to have been a 7th place at the Plouay GP (whatever you call it now) in 2018. Last year he was 4th at the Tro Bro Léon.


    By the way, Philippe Gilbert chose to race Paris-Roubaix this year at the exclusion of the Ardennes. For his last season, we could've thought that he as a Liégeois would choose to race before his own crowns but he still got breathing problems. Phil had some weird comments about Paris-Roubaix :

    Quote
    Paris-Roubaix is hard but it's overdone. Liège-Bastogne-Liège and the Tour of Lombardy are much harder monuments. At Paris-Roubaix, you can always stay in condition. Even when you are not in top form, when you are dropped you can come back. In 2018, I had a sunstroke. I missed a bidon, I rested a bit and when I recovered, I passed a lot of guys to end 15th. I was almost disappointed that the race finished so early. When you are dropped on the Redoute, you never come back in condition. It's the same, in Lombardy, when you are dropped on the Sormano, you can at best hope to finish 15' or 20' behind.
    https://www.dhnet.be/sports/cyclisme/philippe-gilbert-rester-dans-le-jeu-de-paris-roubaix-serait-un-bon-resultat-625850ee9978e23b8f47de90

    What is surprising to me is that I perfectly remember reading the Dernière Heure in 2007 after that year's edition of Paris-Roubaix and reading young Française des Jeux rider Philippe Gilbert saying this was even harder than the Tour of France. He had just finished 52nd at his first Paris-Roubaix. He would never race it again before 2018. What has changed in-between ? Well of course, the "Amis de Paris-Roubaix" have re-aligned the cobbles, making them more regular, so the race might be easier than it used to be (hence Greg Van Avermaet beat the fastest average speed record by Peter Post which seemed unbeatable because on a radically different route). Phil also got more experienced and could take better trajectories (but since he did not race in 11 years between 2007 and 2018?).

    For testimonies that I have heard, Paris-Roubaix is definitely the hardest of them all because of the flat nature of it. The cobbled sections are at least equally as hard as asphalt climbs in Liège-Bastogne-Liège but after climbs, you automatically have descents in which you can rest freewheeling while at Paris-Roubaix you barely have any descents or false flat descents (yes, Pont-Thibault is descending, and there are declivities in the first sections before Valenciennes, but most of the route is panflat !). So you cannot afford to go all out on the sections because you still need to race in the asphalt sections between cobbles.
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  • Echoes

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #15 on: April 16, 2022, 13:08 »
    Nice interview of Alain Bondue commenting about the #9 Pont-Thibaut section in Ennevelin. Not the hardest of them all, a 3-star section but there are crashes. Bondue remembers a very dry edition. He was getting back to a group ahead of him and was among the following cars but it was very dry and dusty. He couldn't see anything 10m ahead of him. At some point on the section, there was a turn that he couldn't see and so he went straight into the field. Crashes belong to Paris-Roubaix, he says. But it's always scary because if it's dry, you'll crash at high speed while if it's wet, you'll crash more slowly but more heavily.



    At 1'07 you can see a former Paris-Roubaix section. It was right at the end of present-day Pont-Thibaut. Riders would turn left and take that other section, if I understood correctly. It was so bad and so risky that Bondue once decided to cross that section on foot like a cyclocross rider with his bike on the shoulder, as he shows on the photograph. Then he shows another photograph from one year after. That time he crossed it on the bike but it was the last year that that part was on the route. The section has now been covered with schist.



    Then Bondue says that his favourite section is still the Arenberg Forest where you cannot win Paris-Roubaix but you can lose it.

    Bondue was 3rd in 1984, 10th in 1983, 2nd in the 1982 Milan Sanremo and dual World Pursuit Champion in 1981 and 1982.
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  • « Last Edit: April 16, 2022, 13:32 by Echoes »

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #16 on: April 16, 2022, 15:05 »
    in the pre-race interview (no idea why there are today), Degenkolb just said that #dsm DSM will not race the new adjustable tyre pressure system tomorrow, but that he sees is a definite game changer for the future



    Also generelly, new bike setups seem to have changed the race quite a bit in recent years. Kristoff for example said, that he never really was comfortable on the Roubaix cobbles, but now with the wider 32 mm tyres, he felt as good as never before during the recon.
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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #17 on: April 17, 2022, 17:13 »
    I just went back to watch the final 20K again. Now I don't feel so bad about not discerning the winning move as it happened during the race. They didn't actually show it very clearly on camera. No wonder why I was so confused!!!

    Having just made about two dozen edits to my original post, after reviewing the video several times, I'm reposting the entire thing below with all my updates.


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  • « Last Edit: April 17, 2022, 18:08 by Drummer Boy »

    Drummer Boy

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #18 on: April 17, 2022, 18:08 »
    Here's what I just observed from the replay:

    With about 18.7 KM remaining, in the middle of sector 5 (the 4-star Camphin-en Pévèle), Van Baarle opened up what was only about a 4 second gap on Mohoric and Lampaert. Even as they exited onto the road, the gap was still the same. Then, with the cameras constantly switching back-and-forth between the chasers, WVA, MvdP, and Ben Turner crashing, they didn't show the leader again until around 17.0 KM remaining as he entered the 5-star sector of Carrefour de l'Abre.

    At 16.5 km remaining, you can clearly see Mohoric chasing with only about an 8-second gap separating he and Lampaert from Van Baarle (with what looked to be a strong tail-wind for the leaders at that moment). All the while, the on-screen graphics were showing gaps of 40+ seconds back to the other chasers, but that info never took into account the actual time gaps between Van Baarle and Mohoric, so it made for some confusing viewing (even as I watched the replay).

    Another 2K would pass before they clearly showed Van Baarle again, now with 14.5 KM remaining, and again the screen, and the comms, were declaring a 40 second gap. But again, that's the time difference that the on-screen clock had always been displaying. There was no accurate depiction of exactly where Mohoric was at the time, and the overhead cameras never stayed in place long enough to make a visual reference from passing landmarks. The gaps being displayed were reflecting the distance to the  WVA group, and not the differences between the 1st, 2nd and 3rd place riders on the road.

    Then with 12.6 km remaining, the cameras pick up Van Baarle as he enters sector 3 (the 2-star Gruson) with a displayed gap of 20 seconds, which is probably an accurate gap from him back to Mohoric. So the bigger gaps that ultimately determined the winner were never apparent on-screen. The comms were suggesting that the displayed gap of 20 seconds was more likely 40 seconds, but if true, I've no idea how that gap grew so quickly from the 8-second gap that was visually indisputable just a brief time previous.

    I also rewatched slo-motion footage of the crash that took down Lampaert. He was riding just barely off the cobbles, not even fully onto the paved side section, and that roadside fan was definitely stepping out further onto the road than he should have. He was clapping in support with both hands extended, and you could see him get spun around a bit as his arms made contact with Lampaert's. Very unfortunate, and wholly the fault of the fan. Mohoric was just off Lampaert's wheel at the time, and was no closer to the fans either. Both riders were on that balancing line that separates the cobbles from the tarmac edges. They shouldn't have been interfered with there.
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  • Echoes

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #19 on: April 17, 2022, 21:41 »
    It looks like the best man in the race won today. Though at first we might have thought that Wout van Aert really was the best man when he attacked in Mons-en-Pévèle but perhaps due to the preparation not being optimal after corona illness, he had to let it go. At first Mohoric and Lampaert broke away. There was no reaction in the chase group. Then you could think they had it under control. Lampaert is an outsider and Mohoric was maybe exhausted from his early attack. But when Dylan van Baarle attacked solo to chase the duo, a good Van Aert should have gone with him. Then Van Baarle increased his lead in Camphin and then in the Carrefour de l'Arbre, the two decisive sections in which top favourite Van Aert should've made his effort and did it. So the strongest was ahead.

    Van Aert agreed in interview that the best men won and the 2nd place was the highest possible position to get for him today. Of course he claimed that he and his team had "bad luck" but was classy enough not to complain about it. After all every rider had his share of punctures.

    Love it when the RTBF interviewer asked Van Aert if he "really" was surprised about his performance because "we thought you were bluffing this morning"  :S. He replied : "C'est le moment d'arrêter avec ces questions" ! In a very good French, not his first language of course ! So "It's about time you stopped with these questions".  :D "I was sick, I did everything, really everything to get here in the best possible shape. I'm proud of having done it and happy to be on the podium".

    You can see the interview here if you speak French.  ;)

    Wout also confirmed that he will race Liège-Bastogne-Liège. Hopefully Mathieu also will but the latter doesn't seem that fresh anymore.  :(
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  • Echoes

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #20 on: April 17, 2022, 21:58 »
    Looking back in history, Dylan van Baarle is the 7th Dutch winner of Paris-Roubaix after Peter Post in 1964, Jan Janssen in 1967, Jan Raas in 1982, Hennie Kuiper in 1983, Servais Knaven in 2001 and Niki Terpstra in 2014. As Drummer Boy said in the shoutbox, he broke the fastest average speed ever 45.792 kmh compared to 45.204 kmh for Greg Van Avermaet in 2017 and 45.129 kmh for his late compatriot Peter Post in 1964 (on a radically different route).

    I've been trying to look at all the riders who won Paris-Roubaix solo. The last one to do it was fellow Dutchman Niki Terpstra. But 1'47" seemed such a huge gap to me. Actually, it's not unusual, Fabian Cancellara is the last one with a bigger gap.

    In bold, the gaps that greater than Van Baarle's. I'm not sure about the 1923 to 1925 editions but I think all of them ended in the group sprint. Of course, in the EPO Mapei years you had really huge gaps.

    1896   Fischer   26'   Meyer   
    1898   Garin M   29'32"   Stéphane   
    1899   Champion   23'20"   Bor   
    1900   Bouhours   18'   Fischer   
    1901   Lesna   26'   Garin A   

    1903   Aucouturier   2"   Chaperon   
    1905   Trousselier   7'   Pottier   
    1907   Passerieu   1'   Van Hauwaert   
    1908   Van Hauwaert   3'35"   Lorgeou   
    1920   Deman   43"   Christophe   
    1921   Pélissier H   40"   Pélissier F   
    1922   Dejonghe   6'   Rossius   
    1929   Meunier C   12"   Ronsse
    In 1930, Jean Maréchal crossed the line first 24" ahead of Julien Vervaecke but was disqualified for causing the latter to crash and relegated to 2nd place. They would probably have sprinted for the win otherwise.    
    1931   Rebry   1'42"   Pélissier C   
    1934   Rebry   5"   Wauters   (Lapébie was disqualified for an illegal bike change, I don't know how far ahead of Rebry he finished)
    1935   Rebry   2'24"   Leducq   
    1939   Masson jr   1'30"   Kint   
    1950   Coppi   2'45"   Diot   
    1951   Bevilacqua   1'32"   Bobet   
    1954   Impanis   6"   Ockers   
    1955   Forestier   15"   Coppi   
    1957   De Bruyne   1'11"   Van Steenbergen   
    1960   Cerami   14"   Sabbadini   
    1962   Van Looy   25"   Daems   
    1965   Van Looy   1'05"   Sels   
    1966   Gimondi   4'08"   Janssen   
    1969   Godefroot   2'39"   Merckx   
    1970   Merckx   5'21"   De Vlaeminck
       
    1971   Rosiers   1'26"   Vanspringel   
    1972   De Vlaeminck   1'57"   Dierickx   
    1973   Merckx   2'20"   Godefroot   
    1974   De Vlaeminck   57"   Moser   
    1977   De Vlaeminck   1'30"   Teirlinck   
    1978   Moser   1'40"   De Vlaeminck   
    1979   Moser   40"   De Vlaeminck   
    1980   Moser   1'48"   Duclos-Lassalle   
    1982   Raas   16"   Bertin   
    1983   Kuiper   1'15"   Duclos-Lassalle   
    1985   Madiot   1'51"   Wojtinek   
    1991   Madiot   1'07"   Colotti   
    1992   Duclos-Lassalle   34"   Ludwig   
    1994   Tchmil   1'13"   Baldato   
    1995   Ballerini F   1'56"   Tchmil   
    1998   Ballerini F   4'16"   Tafi   
    1999   Tafi   2'14"   Peeters
       
    2000   Museeuw   15"   Van Petegem   
    2001   Knaven   34"   Museeuw   
    2002   Museeuw   3'04"   Wesemann   
    2006   Cancellara   1'49"   Boonen (The three-man chase with Hoste, Gusev and Van Petegem was disqualified for illegally crossing a level crossing but I don't remember how close they were behind Cancellara, most certainly less than 1'47")
    2007   O'Grady   52"    Flecha   
    2009   Boonen   47"   Pozzato   
    2010   Cancellara   2'   Hushovd   
    2011   Vansummeren   19"   Cancellara   
    2012   Boonen   1'39"   Turgot   
    2014   Terpstra   20"   Degenkolb   
    2022   Van Baarle   1'47"   Van Aert   
  • ReplyReply
  • « Last Edit: April 18, 2022, 12:34 by Echoes »

    Echoes

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    Echoes

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #22 on: April 18, 2022, 11:51 »
    Christophe Laporte puncturing at Saint-Python, an early pre-Arenberg section ! What an acrobat ! Very professional !  :o

    https://twitter.com/nolan_haegeman/status/1515666706227675136
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  • Servais Knavendish

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #23 on: April 18, 2022, 13:54 »
    made it back for first time in 4 years I think... a joyous day - just brilliant to see everyone out and enjoying the weather and this amazing spectatcle; those 4 years have certainly made a difference technology wise - both route planning and keeping up with the race; but still nothing like craning to see the velodrome screen and awaiting the sound of the helicopter.  Great day.
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  • Echoes

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #24 on: April 18, 2022, 22:30 »
    made it back for first time in 4 years I think... a joyous day - just brilliant to see everyone out and enjoying the weather and this amazing spectatcle; those 4 years have certainly made a difference technology wise - both route planning and keeping up with the race; but still nothing like craning to see the velodrome screen and awaiting the sound of the helicopter.  Great day.

    Were you at the velodrome ? This must be something I should experience one day. Feeling the fervour of the attendance on the velodrome, especially when the first riders come. All former solo winners agree that it's something huge. Madiot said that the greatest moment was when he is at the first corner of the track. Afterwards you are in it and used it. And they say that the spectators are equally enthusiast for the leaders as they are for the last ones !

    But I guess I enjoy that race so much TV/the Internet that I might never really visit it on the spot. It's a dilemma, actually. :D
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  • Echoes

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #25 on: April 19, 2022, 02:09 »
    The story of Alexys Brunel and Bas Tietema on Directvélo !...

    https://www.directvelo.com/actualite/95718/alexys-brunel-et-bas-tietema-si-proches-et-si-loin-dans-la-galere

    Alexys Brunel and Bas Tietema so close and so far in hardship

    Alexys Brunel and Bas Tietema were the last two riders to finish this year's Paris-Roubaix. Brunel crossed the line 43'7" after Dylan van Baarle and Bas Tietema yet another 19 minutes later (1h02'21").

    Tietema :
     
    Quote
    More than an hour behind ? it's a little too much. It's quite a symbol to have a Dutchman first and last. I don't understand why I was congratulated. Okay, it's Paris-Roubaix but I didn't win. I've finished it but I'm more than half an hour out of time limits [time limits were 26'58"]. I had better hope.

    Brunel didn't even know who won.

    Quote
    Van Baarle ? Okay, I would rather someone else. Mathieu van der Poel ? I could immediately see that he was not in a great day.

    When he heard that it was the fastest Paris-Roubaix in history, Brunel said :

    Quote
    Sorry ? For me, it rather was one of the slowest in history !

     :D

    Brunel said he still had good legs when the echelons took form while Tietema was already exhausted :

    Quote
    After three hours, they already raced like in a race finale while it was only the beginning. The Alpecin Fenix accelerated in order to get back. The speed was crazy.

    Both riders had mechanical defects in the first section in Troisvilles. Brunel's right controller in his bars was stuck and he couldn't shift gear. He was stuck on a 54x13 on an uphill section. He changed bike but the tyre pressure was not the same. He burst his hands. Arenberg in such condition was really hard.

    Tietema also had a problem with his handlebars. He found himself back in a reduced group, which was smaller and smaller until he was all alone.

    Tietema and Brunel both raced 100 km alone. Brunel had hoped that there was another guy to race along with him, if only in order to have a little chat, "How are you doing ?" "How come you are here ?" At some point he got the info that there was another rider 15 minutes behind but he could not have waited for 15 minutes. That rider was Bas Tietema ! Tietema found Arenberg mentally very hard to cross but even afterwards he chose to stay in the race. He got some bidons from the last cars, from spectators and even from police officers. Brunel only got one bidon from roadside and then three people saved him with caffeine-free coca-cola.

    Brunel is a "Nordist", a "Ch'ti", so he knows the area very well. His family was in Mons-en-Pévèle, friends of his were in Camphin.
    Quote
    In the Carrefour de l'Arbre, it was amazing. They cheered so much that I went all out through it. I was wondering if I wasn't a bit dumb at that point.


    Of course Brunel did that because it was Paris-Roubaix

    Quote
    In any other race I would have retired but it's Paris-Roubaix. I've got too much love for that race. It's my dream race. I hope that it'll get better in the future. Paris-Roubaix is not just glory. It's also hardship.




    Bas Tietema did not do it like Leif Hoste, Vladimir Gusev and Peter Van Petegem  :lol




    These stories are the reason I love that race. I remember Pablo Urtasun's hardship in 2009. Those guys finishing out of time limits deserve a medal. It's like a victory in its own right !  :cool
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  • Servais Knavendish

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #26 on: April 19, 2022, 08:31 »
    Were you at the velodrome ? This must be something I should experience one day. Feeling the fervour of the attendance on the velodrome, especially when the first riders come. All former solo winners agree that it's something huge. Madiot said that the greatest moment was when he is at the first corner of the track. Afterwards you are in it and used it. And they say that the spectators are equally enthusiast for the leaders as they are for the last ones !

    But I guess I enjoy that race so much TV/the Internet that I might never really visit it on the spot. It's a dilemma, actually. :D


    We managed 4 stops (inc velodrome) and one sighting from motorway too near Orchies.  It is a dilemma as there is nothing like the TV to follow the race even with phone apps in the car, but there is great atmosphere everywhere - and a free barbeque from the Degenkolb family en route to boot.  Being able to walk up the bank to watch the finale is worth the stress of the chase; but you have to rewatch the race to understand what has transpired!
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #27 on: April 19, 2022, 19:42 »
    Here's what I just observed from the replay:
    Yes, the graphics counted Van Baarle & chasers as G1 for quite a while, and the next group as G2, giving the 40-second gap to that group, not Mohoric etc. chasing DvB.
    The Dutch commentators I had on were aware of this from the start and talked about DvB's advantage still being slim until the graphics were corrected :cool - but your commentators apparently didn't. :(
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    Echoes

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #28 on: April 19, 2022, 22:12 »
    We managed 4 stops (inc velodrome) and one sighting from motorway too near Orchies.  It is a dilemma as there is nothing like the TV to follow the race even with phone apps in the car, but there is great atmosphere everywhere - and a free barbeque from the Degenkolb family en route to boot.  Being able to walk up the bank to watch the finale is worth the stress of the chase; but you have to rewatch the race to understand what has transpired!

    How great that should be ! Of course, you've got the app, you can both watch the live coverage and see the riders in real life ! It should be as good as it gets. A friend of mine would often go and see the riders in Auchy-lès-Orchies, that's a 3 km long section after Orchies, harder but lesser known than the section of Orchies itself. I don't know if she still does as I lost contact but she enjoyed it very much.

    Wow the Degenkolb family came all the way from Germany, just for Paris-Roubaix ! That's amazing ! :D
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  • Echoes

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    Re: 119th Paris-Roubaix (257,5 km)
    « Reply #29 on: April 19, 2022, 22:38 »
    This MSN Belgium article says that Dylan van Baarle finished first in 2022 after being last in 2021 : https://www.msn.com/fr-be/sport/other/paris-roubaix-van-baarle-dernier-en-2021-premier-en-2022/ar-AAWmFO0?ocid=uxbndlbing

    It's inaccurate. The last classified rider was  *lv Emils Liepins who finished 95th 28'46" behind Sonny Colbrelli, as they say in the article but there were also 10 riders who finished out of time limits :

    Macej Bodnar, Sébastien Grignard, Florian Maitre, Davide Martinelli, Tom Paquot, Benjamin Perry, Ramon Sinkeldam, Niki Terprstra (former winner!), Tom Wirtgen and Dylan van Baarle. They say Dylan was the last of the 10. Actually he wasn't. He finished in a small group with fellow Dutchmen Niki Terpstra and Ramon Sinkeldam 29'44" behind Colbrelli. Actually the three riders were the first to be out of time limits. The very last rider was Tom Paquot who finished 40'17" behind Colbrelli. Tom Paquot also happened to be a teammate of Tietema's. The Bingoal's are trusting the "red lantern" positions.  :D (OK I laugh but all respect to these riders for their effort)
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