collapse


barrus

  • National Champion
  • Country: 00
  • Posts: 820
  • Liked: 372
Transporting your bike
« on: August 07, 2012, 19:59 »
Many of you already know that I have a new bike this year. This is great, however I am contemplating a cycling vacation. The problem I have is that I am a bit squeemish to put my bike on the plane, and I can't go with an automobile. Do any of you have any experience with transporting your bike on a plain, what are the logistics and what are the odds of your bike getting damaged?

(I posted this here, because I have no idea where to put it otherwise  :P)
  • ReplyReply

  • L'arri

    • Is on Dr Search's Green and Grey Diet
    • Grand Tour Winner
    • *
    • Country: be
    • Posts: 9585
    • Liked: 6786
    • Dopeology.org @DopeologyDotOrg @L_arriviste
      • Dopeology.org
    • Awards: Post of the year 2015Best Opening Post 2012
    Re: Transporting your bike
    « Reply #1 on: August 07, 2012, 20:13 »
    Many of you already know that I have a new bike this year. This is great, however I am contemplating a cycling vacation. The problem I have is that I am a bit squeemish to put my bike on the plane, and I can't go with an automobile. Do any of you have any experience with transporting your bike on a plain, what are the logistics and what are the odds of your bike getting damaged?

    (I posted this here, because I have no idea where to put it otherwise  :P)

    Not done it myself but my brother uses a padded bike box a couple of times a year. You take out the bars and drop the saddle. The outer case is rigid and the inner is tight and snug. The bike does not move and suffers no shocks.

    Luggage cost and/or insurance may increase depending on the airline but it's the best way to go, plus you can usually hire one rather than having to buy.













  • ReplyReply
  • Cycling is a Europe thing only and I only watch from Omloop on cause I am cool and sh*t
    RIP Craig1985 / Craig Walsh
    RIP KeithJamesMc / Keith McMahon / Larry Sarni

    L'arri

    • Is on Dr Search's Green and Grey Diet
    • Grand Tour Winner
    • *
    • Country: be
    • Posts: 9585
    • Liked: 6786
    • Dopeology.org @DopeologyDotOrg @L_arriviste
      • Dopeology.org
    • Awards: Post of the year 2015Best Opening Post 2012
    Re: Transporting your bike
    « Reply #2 on: August 08, 2012, 08:56 »
    I realise now that I am no longer merry on two glasses of a good Saumur that my previous post wasn't that helpful.  :-[  :fp

    Generally speaking, hard cases are the way to go but some of them foolishly attempt to save weight and complexity by not providing enough hard packing foam on the inside.

    Biknd Helium

    The alternative to this is to hire (buy only if you intend to make the investment worthwhile) one of these Biknd Helium cases, a picture of which I posted above. The general purpose is to isolate the freestanding frame from the wheels, add in a couple of well-placed hard case parts and then wrap a third layer over the whole thing. Absolutely bombproof. They even have enough room for spare wheels.







    Only thing different to other cases is that you must also take off the rear mech on this one. Not particularly painful though. Here's the process:

    http://biknd.com/packing/index.html

    SciCon AeroTech - the industry reference

    The SciCon AeroTech has always been the reference for bike boxes and it's a hard case. Quite a chunk of change but the easiest to find for hire.

    Pretty sure this is the one used regularly by my brother. I hear that the bike could wriggle a tiny bit but only if they hire Incredible Hulk as a baggage handler. Being a hard case, it weighs a lot.



    With the SciCon is that you only have to take your pedals and saddle/stem off.

    Weights and costs

    A common limit seems to be around 25kg bike+box, with fees being around €50-80 each way within Europe.
  • ReplyReply
  • « Last Edit: August 08, 2012, 09:12 by L'arriviste »

    Martin318is

    • Domestique
    • Country: au
    • Posts: 614
    • Liked: 163
    • Less interesting than he seems on paper
    Re: Transporting your bike
    « Reply #3 on: August 08, 2012, 10:43 »
    I hate myself for saying this but look up durianrider's youtube feed. He has at least one vid on packing a bike
  • ReplyReply
  • About Masters Club racing:
    ".. if I can't double the petrol money, I'm headin over the mountains instead" - Michael Fox, Team SAS

    just some guy

    • Fourth Generation humanoid bot
    • Hall of Fame'r
    • Country: 00
    • Posts: 37763
    • Liked: 11460
    • Awards: 2020 Tour de France CQ Game winner2017 Spring Classics CQ game winnerBest Avatar of 2016JSG News Filter Award 2014Poster of 2014Thread of the Year 2013Most Helpful Member 2013Art of Brevity 2012Most helpful member 2012Best member of staff 2012
    Re: Transporting your bike
    « Reply #4 on: August 08, 2012, 15:06 »
    I hate myself for saying this but look up durianrider's youtube feed. He has at least one vid on packing a bike

    I suggest a few minutes in front of the mirror to take a good hard look at yourself  ;)
  • ReplyReply
  • Of course, if this turns out someday to be the industry standard integrated handlebar-computer-braking solution then I'll eat my kevlar-reinforced aerodynamic hat.

    Larri Nov 12, 2014

    pedaling squares

    • 2nd Year Pro
    • Country: ca
    • Posts: 349
    • Liked: 106
    Re: Transporting your bike
    « Reply #5 on: August 13, 2012, 04:14 »
    The point is moot if you end up being serviced by this guy:



    I figure hard cases are the best, but a friend told me that he has had success putting his bike into a hockey bag (goaltender size). I realize that those are probably hard to find in NL. I have one myself ( with a hard bottom and wheels too) and you could easily fit the bike, both wheels, full cycling kit/apparel, and have it wrapped up in so much foam that even the worst baggage handler in the world couldn't damage it. Your baggage costs wouldn't be any cheaper, but the cost of the bag sure would.
  • ReplyReply
  • "Well don't run with the riders, you twit."

    Icebreaker

    • 2nd Year Pro
    • Country: ca
    • Posts: 350
    • Liked: 214
    Re: Transporting your bike
    « Reply #6 on: August 13, 2012, 20:50 »
    The bike I now travel with has S&S couplers so that is a different story.

    I have travelled many times over the years with a soft case, the kind with wheels on the bottom and there is a "frame" inside to attach the forks and rear dropouts.

    I put the wheels in the case, one on each side of the bike and I put two pieces of "coroplast" - corrugated plastic sheeting inside each side of the case.  The corosplast is 4mm thick, and very light, but it adds some rigidity and takes any bumps.

    The bag I used for years is the Gist ( much as seen here    http://www.idealo.co.uk/compare/816763/gist-gist-bike-transport-bag.html     )   the bag I would buy if I were shopping now is also on that same page, the EVOC.  I have looked at that bag and it is a beautiful piece of kit.

    The problem with hard cases is that they are hard to store in a hotel and they are hard to get in a taxi or train.  They also take up a lot of your weight allowance before you tip the "overweight" scale.  The Gist bag I have used rolls up when empty and you can fit it in a closet or under the bed, and you can fir it in the trunk or back seat of most cabs because you can "squish" it in.


    I have never had a bike damaged in any way during transport.
  • ReplyReply

  • 42x16ss

    • Domestique
    • Country: au
    • Posts: 681
    • Liked: 377
    • Awards: Velorooms Tour de France BINGO champion 2014
    Re: Transporting your bike
    « Reply #7 on: October 11, 2012, 06:06 »
    I realise now that I am no longer merry on two glasses of a good Saumur that my previous post wasn't that helpful.  :-[  :fp

    Generally speaking, hard cases are the way to go but some of them foolishly attempt to save weight and complexity by not providing enough hard packing foam on the inside.

    Biknd Helium

    The alternative to this is to hire (buy only if you intend to make the investment worthwhile) one of these Biknd Helium cases, a picture of which I posted above. The general purpose is to isolate the freestanding frame from the wheels, add in a couple of well-placed hard case parts and then wrap a third layer over the whole thing. Absolutely bombproof. They even have enough room for spare wheels.







    Only thing different to other cases is that you must also take off the rear mech on this one. Not particularly painful though. Here's the process:

    http://biknd.com/packing/index.html


    I have one of the BikND boxes and they are superb. The sidewalls are inflatible and protect as well as most hardcases but are much lighter. The best part is a lot of checkin staff don't recognise it as a bike box :)
  • ReplyReply

  •  



    Top
    Back to top