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Flo

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Help! Bike for a newbie
« on: March 04, 2013, 16:04 »
:wave

Barry has convinced me to buy a race bike :win but what is a decent, not too expensive ( ;)) bike for a young lady :) Any ideas? I have no idea what's good and what isn't. Can you help me?

And what about shoes, helmet etc?

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    Slow Rider

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #1 on: March 04, 2013, 17:37 »
    Why don't you look on marktplaats for a second hand bike? That's what I did when I wanted to start cycling, much cheaper than buying a new one. Particularly if you're not sure you'll like it, it might be better not to invest a lot of money at first. If you'll continue to like it after having ridden your bike for some time, you can always re-sell your first bike and buy a new and better one. Do make sure it's a good fit though, because a bike that is too big or small for you is really annoying.

    As for helmets, shoes, gloves, etc. Most bike shops or even a stores like Intersport or Perry Sport offer those, shouldn't be a problem finding all that for a reasonable price.
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  • The Hitch

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #2 on: March 04, 2013, 17:49 »
    :wave

    Barry has convinced me to buy a race bike :win but what is a decent, not too expensive ( ;)) bike for a young lady :)

    Plenty ideas available in this thread.

     http://velorooms.com/index.php/topic,46.30.html
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    Blackbandit222

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #3 on: March 04, 2013, 18:13 »
    Yes, decent entry level bike can cost $850 - $1,100 USD.
    You can get cheaper bikes $350 - 750 USD.
    So going used can make sense.
    Super cheap option borrow friends or if you don't have a contacts create some by joining a club.  Some areas have womens only clubs.  If not most men are very interested in helping out young ladies.

    Most bike people own 2-6 bikes so barrowing is not a huge problem.
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  • « Last Edit: March 04, 2013, 18:37 by Blackbandit222 »
    Sagan supporter.

    Flo

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #4 on: March 04, 2013, 21:00 »
    Thanks for the replies everyone :win Hitch :fp
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  • Anthony Moan

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #5 on: March 04, 2013, 22:46 »
    Come here I have two bikes and we could swing :D
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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #6 on: March 04, 2013, 23:12 »
    Come here I have two bikes and we could swing :D

    Lol
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  • L'arri

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #7 on: March 05, 2013, 12:17 »
    I think I'll second Ki's note that women's specific geometry is not essential.

    Mrs L'arri's Canyon is a regular, aluminium frameset in a small size and it does a great job. I have my own reasons to not choose Canyon - they peeed me off - but looking at a Roadlite AL on their website is useful for comparisons on a particular specification.

    This brings me to how you should approach the matter: a) select your frame material and b) desired componentry level (e.g. Aluminium + Shimano 105) based on advice from folks here and then you'll have a starting benchmark from which you can look at other issues like brand reputation, finishing kits, wheels etc.

    Frame material

    Aluminium. Classic looks, light, hardwearing and much cheaper than carbon. Often comes in very attractive fat tube designs. Alu is the ideal place to start your bike odyssey, Florry. Then if in the future you do graduate to carbon, you'll appreciate the little lift effect and be ready for a tougher ride.

    Componentry

    (See Groupset on Wikipedia for definition and current product ranges)

    Groupset: This is about putting down a benchmark rather than engaging in a crapshoot about which chainset is the prettiest. Bear that in mind when making your selection. Groupsets wear out like anything else but you want a nice, trouble-free ride and some groupsets can create more maintenance costs than the kit is worth.

    I can't comment on SRAM but my CX bike is Shimano 105 with a couple of cheapo Tiagra bits (like the cassette). It's a personal matter, but I would not buy anything lower than 105 in Shimano but for a first-ever bike Tiagra would be OK. On the Campag side - my preferred brand - Veloce is still a good basic group. I don't know Centaur but it's the next one up and it looks pretty nice. My Look is a mix of Athena and Chorus and for me it's always been Italian glide and slide over Japanese-Taiwanese precision clunk. If you buy CX, you'll often get different bits for CX-specific use, so don't worry if there are other, less familiar brands in the specs for CX bikes.

    Pedals: it may seem daunting at first but buy clipless, Florry. People who don't use them sometimes worry about the sensation of being "locked in" but if you ski (I don't), you'll understand: otherwise you can waste so much energy slipping and sliding around and not being able to climb properly and not have fun and progress in your cycling.

    Saddle: don't buy the fattest, spongiest, heaviest seat you can find. Those "softies" will often do you more harm than good in the long term. Be careful to choose something that's going to comfortable at the front end with the "ladyshapes". Some ladies like the hollow doughnut saddles for that reason. Better still, ask mew. She knows her onions.

    Wheels: they're important but unless you have a lot of experience, get plenty of spokes as Ki said and get something hardwearing. Mavic Aksiums are quite heavy but they're good all-rounders. Low-end Fulcrum wheels are supposed to be reliable too. Cheaper bikes often come with no-name tyres that may last only one summer but provided they have a bit of a tread on them, it's a decision you can afford to delay if the weather's OK.

    Finally...

    Ask. Ask. Ask. This is what we're here for. Post your links and questions.
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    just some guy

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #8 on: March 05, 2013, 12:20 »
    almost a new signature

    Quote
    Be careful to choose something that's going to comfortable at the front end with the "ladyshapes". Some ladies like the hollow doughnut saddles for that reason. Better still, ask mew. She knows her onions.


     :lol
     
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  • Of course, if this turns out someday to be the industry standard integrated handlebar-computer-braking solution then I'll eat my kevlar-reinforced aerodynamic hat.

    Larri Nov 12, 2014

    sublimit

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #9 on: March 05, 2013, 12:59 »
    Is Florrie the new Mariane Vos then?  :cheesy    Yes some quality advice there particularly the wheels and group components etc.   

    I know a girl who might be after a bike sometime in the future so I'll be studying this. 
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #10 on: March 05, 2013, 13:49 »
    On the Campag side - my preferred brand - Veloce is still a good basic group.
    I can confirm that, very much so.
    I have Veloce on my bike, it runs very well and is easy to adjust even for someone not much into bike mechanics. You will want to let an experienced mechanic do the adjusting the first couple of times, but once you've learned how to do it yourself, it's straightforward.
    Finally, it shifts like a charm.
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    L'arri

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #11 on: March 05, 2013, 13:59 »
    Is Florrie the new Mariane Vos then? :cheesy    Yes some quality advice there particularly the wheels and group components etc.   

    I know a girl who might be after a bike sometime in the future so I'll be studying this.

    Yep. Look out for possible signing-on names in upcoming ladyraces:

    Florina Pushpedali
    Fleur Killeur
    Florry Van Den Bash
    Fleurance Elboa
    Flora Contadoradora
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  • AG

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #12 on: March 05, 2013, 14:02 »
    well - as a complete newbie who recently bought a new bike - I did buy one that is designated as a "womens specific design" and I love it.

    It is definitely more comfortable for me than most of the others I tried. 

    Not saying thats the case for everyone - but try them out.

    Mine is fairly entry level though - but its comfortable, feels great and is fun to ride - and I have managed 200km in less than 2 weeks   :D
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  • « Last Edit: March 05, 2013, 15:18 by AG »

    sublimit

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #13 on: March 05, 2013, 15:18 »
    Yep. Look out for possible signing-on names in upcoming ladyraces:

    Florina Pushpedali
    Fleur Killeur
    Florry Van Den Bash
    Fleurance Elboa
    Flora Contadoradora

    Spotted riding on a "Vos" carbon fibre frame teambike,  10 speed ratio rear gears, internal brake wire/levers and on a super soft ladies gel saddle.     :D
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  • L'arri

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #14 on: March 05, 2013, 16:02 »
    (Seriously, as you can tell by the sort of replies that you got from L'Arri and me, there are some latent bike geeks here who love talking about this stuff and helping however we can ...)

    Oh, I wouldn't pretend to know much, Ki. I just had such a lot of help from folks here when I was buying that I wanted to help too, especially now that I'm a bit more familiar with everything in comparison with last year.

    It's all much better quality kit than it was when I was riding as a youth but in more general terms, it hasn't changed so much since that time. A Campag chainset is still a Campag chainset: a thing of incredible beauty. Although I do think they put too many daft decals on things these days. ;)
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  • Dim

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #15 on: March 05, 2013, 16:04 »
    My cyclocross bike came with Tiagra initially. It survived a hard season of racing and a full winter of (snow, ice, road salt) commuting really well. I replaced it with Veloce - which, as L'Arri says - is a really sweet group.


    My kona still has its original tiagra, done three years, snow, mud, salt, shifts like a dream. Have had one chain replacement.
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  • LukasCPH

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #16 on: March 05, 2013, 16:10 »
    If you look through them, you'll be surprised at how little difference there is across the groupsets - with some of the same functional bits that make it into the top line also finding their way into lower groupsets. Often with the higher level sets you're only paying for a titanium pin or a difference in the name stickers. I recently bought Veloce for my partner's 'cross bike (she's ditching the 105) as we decided that there is no real difference between Veloce and Centaur - at least not one worth the extra 10% or so cost.
    +1 on everything L'Arri says there
    Exactly. Everytime I visited my bike shop, the mechanics commented on how great a group my Veloce was (and I guess they'll know). Keeping in mind that it's the "entry-level" Campa group, I would say (although I'm biased of course as a Campagnolo disciple) that it equals a higher-level (and thus more expensive) Shimano group, even though it may will be more expensive than Tiagra as the "entry-level" Shimano group.

    Don't less this affect you too much though. If you find a nice bike all built and ready with a Shimano group and for a good price (last year's model or just because the seller likes your smile), by all means go for that instead of wanting a Campa group for 100-200 € more (or however much it would be, I have no idea).
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  • Dim

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #17 on: March 05, 2013, 16:37 »
    On the pedals thing, this will very much depend what route you go..

    Road bike, you will be looking at look, or shimano road spd, benefits, really good lock, downsides, you have to wear shoes that are headache to walk in so not very good for social riding etc.

    MTB, probably spd, these have the advantage of much more recessed cleats and you can get plenty of "trainer" style shoes that have spd fittings so better for walking around in.

    Cross Bike, I used to use SPD, but moved to eggbeaters about a two years ago, got a cheap set from a twitter friend who tried them and hated them, and i absolutely love them. Whatever the mud, grit, sand, they clip in perfectly every time, and with such small cleats you can walk on the shoes with no problems at all (used to get slight cleat noise on spd shoes) nothing on eggies, they are totally recessed.

    That said, my recommendation as a beginner would be standard pedals with strapless toe clips in until you get used to riding the bike, but for ease of use, having ridden look, road and mtb spd, i would never leave my eggbeaters now.

    As for bike, someone up there ^^ mentioned i would recommend cross, but as a beginner looking for road geometry without perhaps the seriousness of a real road bike a cross bike would be superb. Ride like a road bike, but with the advantage of being able to ride trails, and off road as well. and much cheaper than a road bike.
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  • Dim

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #18 on: March 05, 2013, 16:41 »
    on a side note, if you decide to buy from wiggle, chainreaction or the like, please use the link on the offers page before buying.. that way velorooms get 4% of  the sale as a commission :D

    but personally depending on how much you spend i would buy locally so you  can get a good fit.
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  • Flo

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #19 on: March 05, 2013, 17:45 »
    how does the frame size thing work? I am 170 cm

    I saw a nice one on marktplaats but it's frame size 60  :S that seems big
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  • just some guy

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #20 on: March 05, 2013, 17:57 »
    florry I think a LBS might be a good idea get a good fit then once you know where you are going by from them, help the little guy or once you have a bike you are after internet shop
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  • Dim

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #21 on: March 05, 2013, 19:33 »
    Gloves - get the best you can afford, they are to a bike what a mouse is to a computer. Better still, blag some off a pro (not that hard to do), just make sure they have the right size hands.. Hendo's fit me like a glove (which they are), Wiggo's.. like putting a condom on an elephant..
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  • just some guy

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #22 on: March 06, 2013, 07:08 »
    Gloves - get the best you can afford, they are to a bike what a mouse is to a computer. Better still, blag some off a pro (not that hard to do), just make sure they have the right size hands.. Hendo's fit me like a glove (which they are), Wiggo's.. like putting a condom on an elephant..

    Hate them myself.

    Only wear them when it is cold
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  • Capt_Cavman

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #23 on: March 06, 2013, 11:30 »
    ... If you were a middle aged desk jockey with a beer gut having his mid-life crisis (which I know you're not), you may not be able to bend that far forward, so will want a higher position ... Like I say, completely personal ...

    Fleur may not be ...

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  • Dim

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #24 on: March 06, 2013, 13:35 »
    Hate them myself.

    Only wear them when it is cold

    How can you not wear gloves, unless of course you are Huschovd being tough at Roubaix. I feel odd without them, on the rare occasion ive ridden without it just feels weird, naked, and not terribly comfortable.
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  • just some guy

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #25 on: March 06, 2013, 13:46 »
    How can you not wear gloves, unless of course you are Huschovd being tough at Roubaix. I feel odd without them, on the rare occasion ive ridden without it just feels weird, naked, and not terribly comfortable.

    Just not a glove guy I do heaps of building, digging etc never wear them feel constricted in them 

    handle bar tape is very important to me always dbl
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  • Flo

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #26 on: March 06, 2013, 17:02 »


    699 eur. just a bit too expensive
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  • Flo

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #27 on: March 06, 2013, 17:47 »
    Meh all the affordable bikes have shimano sora or 2300 :(
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  • Capt_Cavman

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #28 on: March 06, 2013, 18:41 »
    Exactly ...!

    Or are you saying that she may not be not a middle aged guy ... which I think makes her a middle aged guy ... or not ... Oh I'm starting to confuse myself now .... ;)
    Sorry I forgot to stress that Fleur may not be; suggesting that others of us might be... But I screwed it up. Move along please, nothing to see here...
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  • L'arri

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    Re: Help! Bike for a newbie
    « Reply #29 on: March 06, 2013, 18:46 »
    Florry, you need to save a little longer. A couple of hundred more euros will give you more options. €699 isn't quite enough unless you want Decathlon or InterSport own-brand and a low quality build. Otherwise maybe a different sort of bike?
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