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t-72

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Tour de France 2020 Post race review
« on: September 20, 2020, 22:55 »
I created a thread to sum up some thoughts but I may not have time to write everything down tonight. Let's start with the GC results, and a lot has already been said about those already, but they sort of belong here:



All hail the new prince king of the stage races. Winning with a 6 man team is clearly an outstanding performance any which way you flip it, but it wasn't until the time trial he proved to be the best - if you don't count the take back some time effort in the Pyrenees.

On this forum, two years ago, we were eagery awaiting the Tour de l'Avenir victory for some Colombian winner at the Sibiu, but the race was turned upside down by a young Slovenian. Since then, Pogacar just kept going with one impressive result after the other.

I noticed an interview with #jumbo Amund Grøndal Jansen today. On the topic of how they were coping with defeat in the team, he said they were obviously very disappointed, but in the team they also agreed that this was a very fair way to loose a race. There was nothing they could easily have done better, and not a random accident like a chain dropped, a puncture or a crash in a finale outside of 3 km or being caught behind in crosswinds. The race was simply won by a cyclist that was better, and that is actually something they can accept quite easily.

My thoughts on that is that except in the crosswinds stage, Roglic was extremely conservative in the early stages not attacking early, just going for the bonus seconds at the line. If at that time he actually had a physical advantage, they failed to exploit it as much as possible. I think they were fearing that too agressive riding in the first week would lead to a burn-out in week 3, and for that reason they were racing conservatively.

An alternative explanation is that Roglic was still hampered by the fall in the Dauphine and he didn't have any physical superiority, in the first week. He just looked impressive because he had #jumbo. Nice job at concealing weakness, in that case.

Last year at the Vuelta, Pogacar looked the strongest rider in the race towards the end of week 3. In stage20,  Pogacar won,  taking back  1 minute and 41 seconds on Roglic on hat stage. Fast forward to this year's TdF stage 20, and the time gap is 1 minute 56 seconds in favor Pogacar again. Maybe there isn't that much reason to be surprised. #yellow Pogi is a third-week man.

 
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Re: Tour de France 2020 Post race review
    « Reply #1 on: September 21, 2020, 00:36 »
    You can't help but to feel for Primož. He finally got to stand on the podium on The Avenue des Champs-Élysée while the Slovenian  *si national anthem played in the background.

    Just not quite the way he probably envisioned it, even as recently as a few days ago.




    But I'd like to think that he's able to keep it all in perspective, and not let it deter his future ambitions, whatever they may be.

    He's never been known to be openly effusive or over-reactionary in any way, so let's hope that his maturity and calm sense-of-self prevails in the coming months.

    (Of course winning the  #rainbow next week might do wonders for mending a broken heart!  :P)
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  • « Last Edit: September 21, 2020, 00:47 by Drummer Boy »

    Leadbelly

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    Re: Tour de France 2020 Post race review
    « Reply #2 on: September 21, 2020, 11:07 »
    So a pass or a fail for #israel in their first TdF?

    A fail of course, like their previous grand tours, but with a re-sit earned due to unforeseen circumstances.

    The circumstances were of course crashes and injuries both before and during the race. Specifically Dan Martin and Ben Hermans.

    Hermans had shown good form in the races leading up to the Tour and was then caught up in the crashes on stage 1. I think he got a wrist injury. He got in the break one day, but went awol after that. Dan was of course injured at the Dauphine and the team took a risk bringing him along. The risk didn't really work out despite him getting in the break twice.

    I'm not saying they would have gotten a stage win if both had been injury free, but they would have been a lot more visible for sure.

    Elsewhere Greipel was another victim of those stage one crashes and needed stitches. Hofstetter did alright as his deputy tbh, in fact a fourth against this opposition with minimal help is pretty good.

    Neilands tried hard, but I think he showed his limitations in the big mountains.

    Politt was again another multiple crasher. Can't say I noticed him helping out much in the sprints, that was left solely to TVA I think, and then of course he missed his big opportunity on SKA's second stage win.

    Niv did his thing ie. getting to Paris. Can't help think though that Sagiv would have been a better option. He can at least help somewhat on sprint stages.

    So yeah a frustrating race in the main. Some missed opportunities and bad luck with crashes.
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  • Mellow Velo

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    Re: Tour de France 2020 Post race review
    « Reply #3 on: September 21, 2020, 15:44 »
     As the Tour is over, I will place this here.
    Seems  #arkea and Nairo Quintana had the pleasure of a police raid after the Col de la Loze stage.
    Details are sketchy and it is unclear what they were searching for but given the performance of the Colombia star on the road, it is unlikely they were going to find any performance enhancing drugs.

    It does say this: The raid, which was carried out as part of a preliminary inquiry, was not organised in cooperation with the French anti-doping agency (AFLD).

    https://www.cyclingnews.com/news/nairo-quintanas-hotel-room-searched-by-french-police-on-tour-de-france/
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  • "Science is a tool for cheaters". An anonymous French PE teacher.

    Drummer Boy

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    Re: Tour de France 2020 Post race review
    « Reply #4 on: September 21, 2020, 15:51 »
    Seems  #arkea and Nairo Quintana had the pleasure of a police raid after the Col de la Loze stage.

    Perhaps they were looking for hidden brakes. :slow
    You never can be too careful.
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  • Leadbelly

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    Re: Tour de France 2020 Post race review
    « Reply #5 on: September 21, 2020, 18:07 »
    I think it's escalated into a Dark Side matter. :ninja
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  • t-72

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    Re: Tour de France 2020 Post race review
    « Reply #6 on: September 21, 2020, 20:20 »
    OK, let darkness be darkness then, and let me shine some light on an outstanding performance then.... in the words of #israel André Greipel:

    https://twitter.com/AndreGreipel/status/1308009806167453696

    #uae Aleksander Kristoff would also agree , Mørkøv is a fantastic teammate. #lotto Roger Klüge perhaps also worth mentioning in the same league?
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  • « Last Edit: September 21, 2020, 20:45 by t-72 »

    LukasCPH

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    Re: Tour de France 2020 Post race review
    « Reply #7 on: September 21, 2020, 21:07 »
    #uae Aleksander Kristoff would also agree , Mørkøv is a fantastic teammate. #lotto Roger Klüge perhaps also worth mentioning in the same league?
    Kluge is a great leadout man, no doubt about that, but he's not in the same league as Mørkøv.
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    Re: Tour de France 2020 Post race review
    « Reply #8 on: September 22, 2020, 09:32 »
    I actually can't even remember the last time Kluge did a leadout. He has become more of a guide in the early parts of the sprint, same as Sieberg used to be for Greipel, for example. Ewan's final leadout man is (at least in the Tour) Jasper de Buyst.

    Personally I didn't see the #deceuninck Quickstep leadout as impressive, by the way. Sure, Morkov is one of the best, but on Sunday he was off the front too early. Bennett won because he anticipated it, dropped back behind Stuyven, and thereby avoided having to start his sprint too early. There's no chance he would have won from Morkov's wheel
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  • "If this is cycling, I am a banana"

    Drummer Boy

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    Re: Tour de France 2020 Post race review
    « Reply #9 on: September 24, 2020, 01:54 »
    I'd almost forgotten about the ejection of #jumbo DS Merijn Zeeman from the race after Stage 17, in the wake of UCI inspectors scrutiny and disassembly of Roligič's bottom bracket, which led to a heated exchange between the two. (Everything appeared to be above board, by all subsequent accounts.)


    But now I have to wonder as the extent that that disrupted the team dynamics of #jumbo, and what lingering effects that may have had.

    The mindset of Primoż, the somewhat bungled bike exchange during the iTT—how might those be tied to the removal of their team director as they approached the most decisive days of the race?
    :slow

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