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Leadbelly

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Wollongong 2022 World Road Cycling Championships
« on: December 10, 2021, 07:32 »
https://twitter.com/MatMitchell30/status/1469113717023457282

It'll be interesting to see the number of laps of each and the total elevation gain.

Even so, the chances of me getting up at 3am to watch it are slim. :P
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  • Lyn

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    Can anyone tell me if there is a roadbook that is released for the worlds at all? Thanks.
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  • search

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    Can anyone tell me if there is a roadbook that is released for the worlds at all? Thanks.

    yeah, there's a technical guide & general bulletin on the UCI website:

    https://www.uci.org/competition-hub/2022-uci-road-world-championships-wollongong/1qqS4UrU4NRXWzWdxOepih
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  • "If this is cycling, I am a banana"

    Drummer Boy

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    Well this interesting, if true. Johan was saying how both #lotto and #movistar (and a few other teams as well?), because they are both desperately seeking World Tour points, will not be sending any riders to the World Championships. Not wanting to lose their riders for what would likely be a few weeks (due to the extensive travel, jet lag etc.) they will instead keep them closer to home so that they can race and (hopefully for them) score more points for the team.

    In Bruyneel's words, "Valverde is not allowed to go."  :S
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  • Leadbelly

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    Yeah we mentioned it in the 2023 WT race thread.

    Also missing for various reasons will be Carapaz, Pidcock and Ulissi.

    *de

    https://www.bdr-medienservice.de/nachrichten/bdr-nominiert-strassen-team-1

    Elite Männer

    Nikias Arndt (1991/Team DSM)
    Nico Denz (1994/Team DSM)
    Miguel Heidemann (1998/B&B Hotels-KTM)
    Jonas Koch (1993/Bora-hansgrohe)
    Jannik Steimle (1996/Quick Step Alpha Vinyl Team)
    Georg Zimmermann (1997/Intermarché  - Wanty - Gobert Matériaux)

    U23 Männer

    Maurice Ballerstedt (2001/Alpecin-Deceuninck)
    Felix Engelhardt (2000/Tirol KTM Cycling)
    Michel Heßmann (2001/Jumbo-Visma)
    Pierre-Pascal Keup (2001/Team Lotto Kern Haus)
    Jannis Peter (2000/P&S Benotti)
    Tim Torn Teutenberg (2002/Leopard Pro Cycling)
    Hannes Wilksch (2001/Team DSM Development)

    Junioren

    Mauro Brenner (2004/RSG Ansbach)
    Matteo Groß (2004/RV Conc. Reute)
    Emil Herzog (2004/SG Simmerberg 1904)
    Louis Leidert 2005/RSV rad-net)
    Fabian Wünstel (2004/RSV Rheinzabern)

    No Schachers, Politt or Kamna and therefore not the greatest elite team, but they could see some success in the U23 and juniors.

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  • Leadbelly

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    *uk

    https://www.britishcycling.org.uk/gbcyclingteam/article/20220906-gb-cyclingteam-news-British-Cycling-announces-squad-for-UCI-Road-World-Championships-in-Wollongong-0?s=09

    Elite Men

    Ethan Hayter (Road race and time-trial)
    Luke Rowe
    Jake Stewart
    Ben Swift
    Connor Swift
    Ben Tulett
    Ben Turner
    Fred Wright

    Under-23 Men

    Bob Donaldson
    Sean Flynn
    Leo Hayter (Road race and time-trial)
    Oliver Stockwell
    Sam Watson

    Junior Men

    Jed Smithson
    Josh Tarling (Road race and time-trial)
    Zachary Walker
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  • Lyn

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    Thank you, that's much appreciated.
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  • Leadbelly

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    t-72

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    Someone has to post this so here I go again  :angel



    So - what happened?

    A rider that was always regarded as a top talent (with a Tour de L'Avenir victory to prove it) somewhat surprisingly came back from an almost failed season so far and snatched the #rainbow jersey ot of the hands of well-deserved most likely winner *ch Stefan Küng or *be proclaimed total world dominator to come: Remco Evenepoel.

    How did that happen? Maybe the better question is - why didn't anything remotely like this happen before?
    Tobias Foss has almost always been quite clear on his ultimate objective, which is to fight for the podium in grand tours. He has also been quite clear that as a relatively heavy rider he needs to do that through training for high capacity for many years (and not being too worried about weight) and then se how far he can get in terms of climbing ability by managed weight loss later in the career. It is a slow approach towards reaching the top, and he may still get one year better as he gets one year older - or he might just fade out before he gets there. However, he remains clear on what his objectives are. Geraint Thomas has been mentioned as an example of the type of rider he is trying to become, and Foss has already strung up a few too many crashes for my liking, so he might be heading that way.

    This year he trained too much at altitude before the Giro and was clear about that already before start of stage one that althoug he was in theory the captain, the performance wouldn't match the expectations to the role. Then he overtrained again  (!??!?) before the Vuelta. In other words, his GT workload this year was reduced compared to last year. The question I would like to ask was if the decision to not start the Vuelta was taken because #jumbo allowed him to focus on the preparations for the world championship. With Roglic, Dumolin and the mysteriously missing Australian in-house, jumbo performance managers probably knew Foss could reach a very high performance level for the worlds. It appears that his preparation has been very thorough, as he mastered the main challenge of cresting the climb on the 2nd lap with just enough left in his legs to keep going fast through all the curves to the finish line. "It wasn't a very technical course, really, but it was also very busy,"  he said, "there wasn't any section where you could just push with all your power".

    While Foss executed more or less flawlessly and according to plan, *uk Ethan Hayter dropped his chain, *us Magnus Sheffield drove himeself over the barriers, *it Filippo Ganna had a bad day, and was clearly not the Gannamachine. *au Rohan Dennis's brother was getting married.

    *be Remco Evenpoel - won the best reaction award (that clip will go viral and come back every year) but the example now shows quite clearly that 3 weeks GT GC racing until the bitter end is not the best preparations for the world championships on the other side of the world a week later. In the end, he got the same results as Chris Froome in 2017: the red jersey and the big ugly fruit platter, plus a bronze medal at the world championship ITT. I think he looked better than Froome, but the results were the same.

    *ch Küng could have won it, but misjudged how much force he should put into the climb on the second lap: he crested the climb with 11 secs advantage, but the effort backfired down in the city streets, where Foss quite surprisingly was able to claw back those seconds as Küng's engines seemed to run out of power.

    The time gaps on the podium were small, the perfect execution by Foss probably won the race, as his balanced effort on the climb versus the final flatter section was decisive. One might also wonder if there were any notable aerodynamic advantages compared to Küng (I think: probably). Finally we get an idea about how good is time trials can be if not stuck in the middle of a grand tour: world top level. For a former Avenir winner with the time trial as one of his strong points,  that is not a shocking result, is it?

    https://twitter.com/UCI_cycling/status/1571400346622382080
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  • t-72

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    I have read a bit on other social media sources today and my impression is that quite a few that I imagined followed cycling closely have no clue about where Foss came from. I would almost call it ignorance, as people mostly read pro racing stats and concludes he hasn't won anything of significance before. However, his junior and U23 results can be compared with many top riders and includes good results in different styles of races including the U23 LBL.
    On top of his list until today, though - undoubtedly the Tour de L'avenir and maybe also his inventory of *no national championships, amongst which I value the road race higher as he had only Staune Mittet to help himself in dismantling the numerically superior uno-x squad, in horrible weather conditions.
    As a junior, in 2015, he finished 2nd behind some russion guy that time forgot (for reasons)  in the European championships ITT. Behind him on the list Pavel Sivakov, Marc Hirschi, Jasper Philipsen, João Almeida, and Tadej Pogacar, to name a few.

    His first years as a U23 rider has some good results, but few great results. Anyway, the good news were clear indications something was cooking - winning the white jersey in Tour of Norway, and then - the Avenir, a race that suits him much better than the northern european races. 
    He comes in 4th on stage 8 of the Tour de L'avenir, a hard mountain stage from ALbertville to St. Foy Tarentaise, 120 km. Practically same time as stage winner, none other but Egan Bernal (3 seconds split). There are a few well known names further down on the list, such as James Knox, Steff Cras and Micael Storer, but the time gaps are enormous after the first 9 riders, and further down the list they come:  Hirschi and Hindley at 02:33, Gino Mäder at 03:32. Sivakov at 16:37 with Powless. Vlasov at 19 minutes.  Foss finishes in 7th position on the GC.
    2018 was another season where things didn't really go his way. In the Avenir, he finishes the stage to Val d'Isère in 10th with the very reduced bunch but - Pogacar had a long range attack that knocked out the peloton. In same group: Gino Mäder, Clemet Champoussin, Aleksandr Vlasov and João Almeida.
    2019 - his best year to date, he was in the final 3-man group for the LBL Espoirs in the spring (but lost the sprint and came in 3rd). The results list from this race is a bit strange, I think 2/3 of top 20 must have quit the sport since, but further down the list we ssee some familiar names like Almeida, Pidcock, etc. However, his season is carefully planned for winning the race that suits him best and in the Tour de L'Avenir he grabs yellow on stage 3, and reclaims it after the short uphill road race stage to Meribel Col de la Loze.  Stage 9 to Tignes, he cements the lead dropping his main opponents on the final climb. Final stage 10 he controls it, and wins the GC.  In the fall, he finishes in the first group (--ignore Eekhoff) in the U23 road race (with Batistella, Bisegger, Pidcock, Iguita and Kron)
    2020 - another not so good year with one stage 1 of the Giro de Italia worth mentioning. He finished 30 seconds behind Ganna,  and there were comments that the wind had a great impact on time for some of the riders. Roahn Dennis and Simon Yates were 15-20 seconds or so behind Foss.
    2021 -  3rd in opening time trail in the giro (but it was very short). Finishes 9th GC, again a good result in terms of GC without any very notable stages. Wins 2x national championships, both ITT and road race.

    For what it is worth, Tobias Foss is hardly a comet, he has been around for a few year s now and he hasn't been up there with the best every year. He is not a time trial specialist, more of an all-rounder with good time trialing. Now that has evolved to "champion level".  There are many that don't know much about him, but he has some good results from junior and U23 classes, while injuries, sickness and overtraining has prevented him from performing at his best this year. Apparently, when he does perform at his best, he can beat all the others on the start line. 
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  • t-72

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    This looks good  :D


    Probably going to be best *no world championship since Limburg, and better still.
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  • t-72

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    So, these Norwegians all look like typical time trial specialists, big vikings, tall and strong.
    Wærenskjold on the right, Nordhagen on the left.
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  • Leadbelly

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    https://twitter.com/cycloben2/status/1572116214385905664



    For Tarling, even on restricted gears, that would have been good enough for 7th in the U23.

    It's not possible to compare the categories every year as they don't always ride the same course/distance, but that has been bettered fairly frequently in recent years by Evenepoel in 2018 (joint 4th), McNulty (3rd!) in 2016 and Appelt (4th) in 2015. That doesn't factor in changes in weather/wind of course. The Doha U23s event for instance was wind affected from what I remember.
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  • Drummer Boy

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    I'm confused by the time-zone differences. Is the men's road race this evening (for Europe) or tomorrow?
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  • Leadbelly

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    Errr neither. :D

    It's very early on Sunday with the women's races tomorrow.
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Leadbelly

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    WT #rainbow Evenepoel

    PCT #rainbow Sagan

    CT #rainbow Conci

    Amateur #rainbow Canecky
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  • « Last Edit: September 25, 2022, 14:48 by Leadbelly »

    Echoes

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    It's a such shame I couldn't watch it live but I watch some short highlights here :



    The distance that he covered alone and the lead that he had, that is phenomenal. I'm looking for a longer gap on a World Championship. Bernard Hinault *fr "only" had a 1'01" lead on Gianbattista Baronchelli *it on the hard circuit of Sallanches.

    So it must be back to Imola 1968 when Vittorio Adorni *it had a 9'50" lead on the late Herman Vanspringel *be (but the peloton didn't really chase back then).

    This must be the most impressive Worlds win in decades.

    By the way as I said last year this is the biggest gap equalled between two Belgian Worlds win

    Philippe Gilbert 2012
    Remco Evenepoel 2022

    The former 10-year gap was

    Marcel Kint 1938
    Briek Schotte 1948

    But there was a war between the two.
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  • « Last Edit: September 25, 2022, 12:24 by Echoes »
    "Paris-Roubaix is the biggest cycling race in the world, bigger than the Tour de France, bigger than any other bike race" (Sir Bradley Wiggins)

    Echoes

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    By the way, I hope that the truth will come out of the Mathieu van der Poel case but it looks a real shame to me that a rider should come from so far away only to get disturbed at his hotel room on the eve of a major race. I don't think Mathieu could have beaten Remco Evenepoel but getting some high placement was definitely within reach. What Wout van Aert can do Mathieu van der Poel can do (better ?).

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  • Armchair Cyclist

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    WT #rainbow Evenepoel

    PCT #rainbow Sagan

    CT #rainbow Conci

    Amateur #rainbow Swenson
    Would Canecky (65th rather than Swenson's 73rd) not be considered the first amateur?
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  • search

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    I can see where your excitement comes from, but for me this was one of the most boring World Championships I have ever seen. Evenepoel was strong of course, but it felt like the other teams did not only fail to prevent him from getting this opportunity, but also contributed to his success.

    There's no way anyone should have allowed him to get up the road (and with team mates) this early, but still, teams like France even sent riders to the front to make sure that their better riders behind in the peloton never got the chance to get back into contention. So in the end Evenepoel basically only had to beat some riders which no one would have even seen in Top 20 or so before the race, which makes it hard for me to judge his performance.

    Sure, it's not him to blame for that, but most of the bigger nations did a tactically disastrous race today. Although France even got rewarded with silver for it.
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  • Leadbelly

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    Would Canecky (65th rather than Swenson's 73rd) not be considered the first amateur?

    You are right. I didn't realise he wasn't at Dukla anymore.
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  • Drummer Boy

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    I watched nearly all of the race, and while the end result was immensely impressive, the viewing experience left much to be desired. Remco seemed destined to win this edition regardless of the competitive field, but it really would've been nice to see so many of the top riders that were missing.

    The course was well-suited to a healthy and in-form Roglič, and I would love to see what he, Pogačar and Mohorič would be capable of if firing on all cylinders together.

    Likewise, who knows what a complete British squad might be capable of if Tom Piddcock and so many of his countryman were not exhausted from a grueling season or kept out for various reasons.

    Or Denmark with Mads Pedersen and Jonas Vinngegaard? How could that duo not pose a serious threat when healthy and strong?

    Of course the most glaring non-factor was Mathieu van der Poel. What an unfortunate turn of events that turned out to be. :fp

    The impracticality of having the race in Australia, along with all the relegation nonsense that so many teams and riders were contending with seemed to rob the event of many marquee participants. Hopefully we'll see a much more dynamic field next year in Scotland, and I'm very curious to see how moving the event to early August will affect all of the above mentioned issues.

    As I type this, I'm only just now realizing how big an event is being planned for the "inaugural edition of the UCI Cycling World Championships." I hadn't been paying attention, so I really had no idea. I've been thinking that it would be a great excuse for me to finally visit Scotland, but given the enormity of the event being planned, I'm not sure if that would be a good or bad thing in terms of travel.

    The UCI Cycling World Championships, to be held every four years in the year preceding the Olympic Games, brings together various disciplines of cycling for them to be held as part of one event, including the UCI Road World Championships, UCI Mountain Bike World Championships and UCI Track Cycling World Championships.

    Wow, that's a lot of cycling!  :o :cool :) I'll now have to give this some serious consideration.

    How many of you are planning on attending next year?
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  • Slow Rider

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    Obviously Evenepoel was incredibly strong, but I agree with Search that this was the most boring WC in a long time. There was basically no action from any of the favourites other than Evenepoel.

    I'm a bit confused why no one chased after the Evenpoel group. Sure, most countries had a rider or two in there, but did they really expect Conci, Hindley or Eenkhoorn to beat Evenepoel? Surely the Aussies and Italians would have had a far better chance if they chased all-out to bring Matthews and Bettiol back into the race?

    The French, in particular, rode a crazy race. They launched the attack that set up Evenepoel, and despite one of the top favourites being there while all the French leaders were back at the peloton, kept going for a while. Later, Madouas looked quite strong in that one sort-of-attack he did that brought the peloton up to a minute, with Alaphilippe and Laporte still there as well, and Cosnefroy too probably. Why not tell Bardet and Sivakov to drop back and chase for them at that point? Instead, they sat up in the peloton, the break went back to 2 minutes, and it was all over.

    The Belgians played it perfectly, and Evenpoel was very strong. But that, really, is what leaves a bit of a sour taste. Had Evenpoel dropped Pogacar, Matthews and Küng (not to mention Van der Poel) the way he dropped Lutsenko, he would have shown himself to be truly the best in the world. Evenepoel won't be complaining at all, but if he was really as strong as he appeared, he was robbed of a victory for the ages by the stupidity of his opponents.
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  • Drummer Boy

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    Well this is quite the crew. I haven't watched it yet but figured I'd share.

    The Move: 2022 Mens World Championships feat. Jan Ullrich, Mark Cavendish, and Bradley Wiggins


    I never knew that Remco ran a 1:10 half-marathon. Wow.

    Edit:
    I got through it. The audio is painfully bad, but there were some interesting takeaways. Most notably:

    Amazon is doing a documentary on Jan's life. Should be released in late 2023. He's looking quite good these days.  :)

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  • « Last Edit: September 25, 2022, 22:34 by Drummer Boy »

    Echoes

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    I must admit that I haven't seen the race as I'm sleeping at 5am  :D and had to work today but it's often been the case in the past that winners with a solid lead actually had capitalised on an apathetic chasing peloton to build up their lead. So I can trust what Search and Slow Rider are saying. But were chasing teams really tactically inept or did they simply lack the legs to organise a chase that is liable to win back some time on Remco ? I mean, strictly based on highlights, I saw Remco Evenepoel attacking twice before the decisive attack. That was respectively with 59 and 56k to go. The decisive attack occurred 34k to go. If Remco could afford to attack three times from the peloton, that could be because he could feel he was in a great day and fitter than his opponents. Also Evenepoel was definitely one of the two or three top favourites for this championship and anyone knows that he attack from far away and hold through. Normally nobody in top shape should've let him break away. So isn't it more a matter of not having the legs to keep his wheel than tactical mistakes ? Earlier on it seemed that Tadej Pogačar was quite active, so why did he let him break away ?
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  • Echoes

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    By the way, just here a list of all the 1 minute + gaps between first and second or first and third in the history of the Worlds. In bold, those superior to Remco Evenepoel's gap

    1927 - Adenau *de :  1 Alfredo Binda *it 2 Costante Girardengo *it 7'16" 3 Domenico Piemontesi *it 10'51"
    1928 - Budapest  *hu : 1 Georges Ronsse *be 2 Herbert Nebe  *de  19'43" 3 Bruno Wolke  *de s.t. (This is the highest gap ever but Georges Ronsse was in the lead with Jules Van Hevel and the latter crashed and retired after the tail of a cow that was crossing the road got stuck in his brakes)
    1931 - Copenhagen  *dk : 1 Learco Guerra *it 2 Ferdinand Le Drogo *fr 4'37" 3 Albert Buchi 4'48" *ch (This is actually the very first ITT World Championship in history)
    1932 - Roma *it : 1 Alfredo Binda *it 2 Remo Bertoni *it 15" 3 Nicolas Frantz *lu 4'52" 
    1933 - Montlhery *fr : 1 Georges Speicher *fr 2 Antonin Magne *fr 5'03" 3 Marinus Valentijn *nl 5'04"
    1935 - Floreffe *be : 1 Jean Aerts 2 Luciano Montero  *es 2'57" 3 Gustaaf Danneels 9'08"
    1936 - Bern  *ch : 1 Antonin Magne *fr 2 Aldo Bini *it  9'27" 3 Theo Middelkamp *nl  s.t. (Magne was in the lead with Gustaaf Deloor, who punctured and didn't finish the race)
    1948 - Valkenburg *nl : 1 Briek Schotte *be 2 Apo Lazaridès *fr 1" 3 Lucien Teisseire *fr 3'41"
    1950 - Moorslede *be : 1  Briek Schotte *be 2 Theo Middelkamp *nl 1'01" 3 Ferdi Kübler *ch 1'48"
    1953 - Lugano *ch : 1 Fausto Coppi *it 2 Germain Derycke *be 6'22" 3 Stan Ockers *be 7'33"
    1954 - Solingen  *de : 1 Louison Bobet *fr 2 Fritz Schaer  *ch 12" 3 Charly Gaul  *lu 2'12"
    1955 - Frascati *it : 1 Stan Ockers *be 2 Jempy Schmitz *lu 1'03" 3 Germain Derycke *be 1'15"
    1958 - Reims *fr : 1 Ercole Baldini *it 2 Louison Bobet *fr 2'09" 3 André Darrigade *fr 3'47"
    1963 - Salo *it : 1 Jean Stablinski  *pl/*fr 2 Seamus Elliott  *ie 1'22" 3 Jos Hoevenaers *be 1'44"
    1965 - San Sebastian *es : 1 Tom Simpson  *uk 2 Rudi Altig *de s.t. 3 Roger Swerts *be 3'40"
    1968 - Imola *it : 1 Vittorio Adorni *it 2 Herman Vanspringel *be 9'50" 3 Michele Dancelli *it 10'18" (Adorni broke away after 50k, Van Looy went with him. Therefore the Belgian didn't chase and eventually ageing Van Looy dropped and didn't finish the race. That's how this huge gap was created)
    1969 - Zolder *be : 1 Harm Ottenbros *nl 2 Julien Stevens *be s.t. 3 Michele Dancelli *it 2'18"
    1971 - Mendrisio *ch : 1 Eddy Merckx *be 2 Felice Gimondi *it s.t. 3 Cyrille Guimard *fr 1'13"
    1977 - San Cristobal  *ve : 1 Francesco Moser *it 2 Dietrich Thurau *de s.t. 3 Franco Bitossi *it 1'19"
    1980 - Sallanches *fr : 1 Bernard Hinault *fr 2 Gianbattista Baronchelli *it 1'01" 3 Juan Fernandez *es 4'25"
    1983 - Altenrhein *ch : 1 Greg LeMond  *usa 2 Adrie van der Poel *nl 1'11" 3 Stephen Roche *ie 1'11" s.t.
    1984 - Barcelona *es : 1 Claude Criquielion *be 2 Claudio Corti 14" *it 3 Steve Bauer  *ca 1'01"
    2022 - Wollongong  *au : 1 Remco Evenepoel *be 2 Christophe Laporte *fr 2'21" 3 Michael Matthews *au 2'21"


    These are gaps from another era !  :o
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  • « Last Edit: September 26, 2022, 00:52 by Echoes »

    Drummer Boy

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    Wout didn't even know they were sprinting for the podium.  :S

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    But were chasing teams really tactically inept or did they simply lack the legs to organise a chase that is liable to win back some time on Remco ? I mean, strictly based on highlights, I saw Remco Evenepoel attacking twice before the decisive attack. That was respectively with 59 and 56k to go. The decisive attack occurred 34k to go. If Remco could afford to attack three times from the peloton, that could be because he could feel he was in a great day and fitter than his opponents

    the peloton with the other favourites was basically out of the race for the win from 75k out, when a big breakaway group sneaked away, and Evenepoel jumped to it. No one tried to follow him at that point, and nations like France, Australia or Italy were apparently happy with having their 4th or 5th best riders in that breakaway. So the only ones left to chase in the peloton were Germany and Spain, never making much ground.

    Van Aert, Pogacar and so on then tried to make the jump a lap later or so, but were unable to close 2 minutes. So those attacks from Evenepoel you refer to came from the breakaway then, which consisted of a load of guys from the original break, and mainly some younger guys doing their first ever big race (+Lutsenko, Bardet). They were able to follow a couple of moves, but not more, and then the final 35k were basically just Evenepoel vs some disorganized groups behind.
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    Wout didn't even know they were sprinting for the podium.  :S

    neither did Matthews and Laporte, and they still sprinted full out, and got a medal. I think that's what everyone did, or at least should have.

    Not sure race radios would have changed much about it, btw. The Skjelmose group came to a standstill and lost 1 minute between km 4 and 1 to go, and it only became apparent that the peloton would sprint for 2nd with something like 500m left. Sports directors probably had coverage in the cars, but it normally has a bit of a delay, so there wouldn't really have been much time to inform their riders about it as well.

    Skjelmose said that the last gap they got was 1:47, by the way, so he also felt ill-informed, but as they lost 1 minute in very short time, I'd think it's still mainly themselves to blame. As a rider you got to know, that the gaps on the boards can never be 100% accurate.
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  • « Last Edit: September 26, 2022, 10:22 by search »

     

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